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Thread: If I was starting over....

  1. #1

    Smile If I was starting over....

    If I was starting over. I would of kept my 2 old S&W .22 revolvers, a 4" Combat Masterpiece, a 6" Target Masterpiece, they taught my how to shoot a revolver and put many a grouse, ptarmagain and bunny on the table. I would of kept a beautiful Dakota .358 Win. I got for $600.00 and let the original owner have back as we are friends and he sold for cheap again to some one else. I would of kept the Mauser 338-06 with the McMillan stock and Douglas barrel that loved 225 grain Barnes X bullets. I would be shooting a .45 Colt S&W Mountain Gun instead of my .44 Mag. I would of done more hunting with a 30-06. I would of some how tried to justify a good over/under shot gun. I would of bought a couple of old Winchester .22 pumps when I had the chance. I would of bought a nice old Mod. 94 Winchester 30-30 and shot a moose and caribou with it. I would of bought a Big Bore .356 Winchester and shot moose and caribou with it.

    I would not of shot over the back of the big and beautiful interior Toklat grizzly in 1974, I still remember the cross hairs floating over his back when the shot broke, darn it! I would carry a camera more often as I missed some good pictures. I would of spent more time in a wall tent.

    I would be more thankful for life's opportunities, I had more then I deserve.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    If I was starting over. I would of kept my 2 old S&W .22 revolvers, a 4" Combat Masterpiece, a 6" Target Masterpiece, they taught my how to shoot a revolver and put many a grouse, ptarmagain and bunny on the table. I would of kept a beautiful Dakota .358 Win. I got for $600.00 and let the original owner have back as we are friends and he sold for cheap again to some one else. I would of kept the Mauser 338-06 with the McMillan stock and Douglas barrel that loved 225 grain Barnes X bullets. I would be shooting a .45 Colt S&W Mountain Gun instead of my .44 Mag. I would of done more hunting with a 30-06. I would of some how tried to justify a good over/under shot gun. I would of bought a couple of old Winchester .22 pumps when I had the chance. I would of bought a nice old Mod. 94 Winchester 30-30 and shot a moose and caribou with it. I would of bought a Big Bore .356 Winchester and shot moose and caribou with it.

    I would not of shot over the back of the big and beautiful interior Toklat grizzly in 1974, I still remember the cross hairs floating over his back when the shot broke, darn it! I would carry a camera more often as I missed some good pictures. I would of spent more time in a wall tent.

    I would be more thankful for life's opportunities, I had more then I deserve.
    Well now, the thread title could very well be the title to an old gunshooters song. I think ya done came up with the first verse too. I'm reckoning that I could write the second verse. It would be much like your 1st verse only with my own no second chances lines in regards to guns and game. In fact I think that by the time all of our buds on this forum got done writing their own verse it would take a week to sing that song. The last line of your post sang through about 3 times would make a great chorus that should apply to all of us.

    Not sure I would want to start over. Mighta ended up with an ugly wife that could not cook wild game like this one can. Never had a bad bird dog and doing it all over again might land me one that points rabbits and humps legs😕

    There are no do overs and there are no regrets that would justify starting over. My first 45 years of hunting/fishing and all that goes with it was nothing but pure enjoyment. Now that I'm older than dirt a lot of the fun things have become more like work. Yet we outdoorsman are defined by what we do. I will keep crawling up in trees, walking out coyote tracks, cleaning my guns in my long Johns in front of the TV, sitting in the woods for hours as the mosquitoes mate in my ears. I will not call it a day until the last bluegill is soaking in water and the last squirrel is in a freezer bag. As long as there is blood pumping through my veins I will adhere to my outdoorsman ways.

    When my last breath leaves my lungs I want all of my ammo cans to be full of ammo. All of my guns to be sighted in and all of my knives to be razor sharp. If I have done my part then everything will be in place for my kids and grand kids to pick it up where I left off and I can become that smiling turd in the Forrest😀.

  3. #3
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    I have had a pretty good run so far and it's not over yet. As far as guns go I have only got rid of 4 or 5 and there's only one of those that I even wished I hadn't let someone talk me out of. It's a Browning 78 in 6mm Rem. There are still a couple that I would like to get some day and I probably will before it's over. It would be sad not to have something to look forward to and I don't look backward too much. The future I can look forward to changing to what I like. The past is what it is and I try not to look back with coulda, shoulda, woulda. Maybe some day I will have that Colt Python that I like so much although it's not something a need very bad. No matter, life is good.

  4. #4

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    I've regretted every single gun that slipped through my fingers in the early days. Learned my lesson from it though. I haven't parted with a gun in quite a few years now, and don't plan to. Collectors and speculators can go pound sand, and if I need a new gun I can't afford at the moment, I'll just save longer in order to buy.

    Can't control what my kids do after they inherit some day, but I'm pretty sure they'll be locked and loaded when the gun buzzards start pounding on the door after I die. There are guys who specialize in hitting a widow or kids right after a death and trying to cheat them out of valuable guns in their grief. They got a nasty surprise coming at the door of my house. The family is well educated and have a real poor opinion of the buzzards.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I've regretted every single gun that slipped through my fingers in the early days. Learned my lesson from it though. I haven't parted with a gun in quite a few years now, and don't plan to. Collectors and speculators can go pound sand, and if I need a new gun I can't afford at the moment, I'll just save longer in order to buy.

    Can't control what my kids do after they inherit some day, but I'm pretty sure they'll be locked and loaded when the gun buzzards start pounding on the door after I die. There are guys who specialize in hitting a widow or kids right after a death and trying to cheat them out of valuable guns in their grief. They got a nasty surprise coming at the door of my house. The family is well educated and have a real poor opinion of the buzzards.
    Good on ya BB! Ingraining the right mind set ito the youngens before the guns become their responsibility is high priority!

  6. #6

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    Those that prey on other peoples grief have a special place in my heart and it ain't a pretty place. But, you are spot on Brown Bear and I always told my wife and kids never sell my guns for what I told Mom they cost! I will have a decent dollar value attached to them. I want some one to be shooting them long after I'm gone and a good goal is to shoot enough to have to replace a barrel once in awhile!

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Those that prey on other peoples grief have a special place in my heart....
    Oh yeah. Seems like half the folks I know have been victimized by the buzzard pukes.

    My wife's own family is on the list. Her dad had remarried (The Wicked Stepmother) later in life, and the gal lived up to her family name. The list of her sins could fill pages. Worst of the worst, she didn't like hunting and fishing, even if that's what he was all about. He married her, and he had to live with it, or so we all thought.

    He had a huge gun collection that my wife and her sibs grew up shooting and cleaning and reloading for, and he'd promised each one of them a portion of the array. When he died a buzzard showed up at the stepmother's door offering to buy it all. She bit and cashed the check for $10k because "she and her natural daughter were so traumatized by his death, they needed to take a cruise to recover." Selfish, self-serving idiot.

    What was in the collection? Too numerous to remember 20 years later, but I remember the high points. He had 8 (count em) Parker shotguns including 3 high-grade 28's and 2 high-grade 20's. He had a Springfield 50-70 carbine unfired in the original army shpping crate. He had a FULL SET of Win-70's in every caliber they made, most unfired in their original boxes. He had more Ithaca doubles than you can count, as well as a number of paired english doubles in their cases, plus 4 double rifles from England and several German and Austrian drillings. That's probably not half the list.

    The buzzard puke had to rent a big Ryder truck to haul it all away. I kid you not. The idiot Wicked Stepmother was pleased as could be to get rid of "all those nasty guns" at once, and have someone else do all the work. If she didn't get "quite enough" for them, the tradeoff was fair in her mind.

  8. #8
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Oh yeah. Seems like half the folks I know have been victimized by the buzzard pukes.

    My wife's own family is on the list. Her dad had remarried (The Wicked Stepmother) later in life, and the gal lived up to her family name. The list of her sins could fill pages. Worst of the worst, she didn't like hunting and fishing, even if that's what he was all about. He married her, and he had to live with it, or so we all thought.

    He had a huge gun collection that my wife and her sibs grew up shooting and cleaning and reloading for, and he'd promised each one of them a portion of the array. When he died a buzzard showed up at the stepmother's door offering to buy it all. She bit and cashed the check for $10k because "she and her natural daughter were so traumatized by his death, they needed to take a cruise to recover." Selfish, self-serving idiot.

    What was in the collection? Too numerous to remember 20 years later, but I remember the high points. He had 8 (count em) Parker shotguns including 3 high-grade 28's and 2 high-grade 20's. He had a Springfield 50-70 carbine unfired in the original army shpping crate. He had a FULL SET of Win-70's in every caliber they made, most unfired in their original boxes. He had more Ithaca doubles than you can count, as well as a number of paired english doubles in their cases, plus 4 double rifles from England and several German and Austrian drillings. That's probably not half the list.

    The buzzard puke had to rent a big Ryder truck to haul it all away. I kid you not. The idiot Wicked Stepmother was pleased as could be to get rid of "all those nasty guns" at once, and have someone else do all the work. If she didn't get "quite enough" for them, the tradeoff was fair in her mind.
    I'm ready to puke.

  9. #9
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Thats a pretty impressive list for sure! I had a friend that had made it in life and enjoyed much wealth - he had me buy many guns to fill in his extensive gun room. He had a gun case built into all four walls of a rather large room and glass doors and lighted... I don't know how many he owned when he died but he bought well over 100 through me that were all very pricy. One wall was nothing but winchesters - model 12's, 42's, 70's etc in all caliber's, Ithica trap guns in high grades, dbl rifles, drilling s and more. Then, you went intro another room full of handguns - it was quite a collection and he said he didn't trust banks so invested it into hardware... Helluva nice guy and never was flashy, drove old station wagons, dressed in simple cloths and was a good person... Started out selling oil out of his truck and eventually owned a big oil distribution company...He did have a son that appreciated guns and two grandsons so I think the collection is still intact...?
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  10. #10

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    And no wicked stepmother! My father-in-law owned sporting goods stores for over 40 years and started serious collecting right after WWII. After getting acquainted with what he kept, I can only imagine the guns he considered but didn't buy over all those years.

    The only guns that survived the mess were his service revolver from his brief stint as a state trooper first thing after WWII (left it with me for disassembly and cleaning shortly before his death) and the old 20 gauge Baker Batavia Leader double that he'd grown up with. He had left that with my wife's sib for her two young kids to use. Certainly the two most personal guns from his life have stayed in the family, and that's good.

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I would be more thankful for life's opportunities, I had more then I deserve.
    Now, when it really comes right down to it, isn't that what we all need to focus a lot more on...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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