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Thread: Cabin foundation?

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    Default Cabin foundation?

    I'm going to get started on a remote cabin this summer and am kicking around ideas for the foundation. I'm thinking a cabin 12x14 and building it on pier blocks. Just 2 rows with 4X8 skids. Anyone have experience building a cabin like this? Any input/feedback appreciatedpier block.jpg

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    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
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    I did exactly that on my cabin. It worked great. I chose to use adjustable brackets on the pier blocks. That allows me to level the cabin occasionally without using too much cribbing or shims. Honestly, for a remote cabin its hard to imagine a simpler or more functional system.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kandiyohi Kid View Post
    I'm going to get started on a remote cabin this summer and am kicking around ideas for the foundation. I'm thinking a cabin 12x14 and building it on pier blocks. Just 2 rows with 4X8 skids. Anyone have experience building a cabin like this? Any input/feedback appreciatedpier block.jpg
    That can work ok for a very small building, so long as the ground is solid/stable. Tho, I'm not a big fan of buildings teetering on threaded rods; I prefer the load be born by a lot more surface area than that.
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    You might want to build 12x16 as osb and plywood come in 4x8 sheets.
    I would skip the adjustable pier rods. Just a little uneven settling could cause them to bend and break allowing the cabin to side shift and fall.
    Would be better to raise the cabin up higher than the picture to help eliminate moisture rotting the wood. To many cabins built close to the ground end up settling and rotting from the bottom up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KantishnaCabin View Post
    I did exactly that on my cabin. It worked great. I chose to use adjustable brackets on the pier blocks. That allows me to level the cabin occasionally without using too much cribbing or shims. Honestly, for a remote cabin its hard to imagine a simpler or more functional system.
    What size cabin did you build? What size beams did you use? I think 4x8 would be plenty if I have a block every 4 ft? Thanks for the input.

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    I built a 16x24 on adjustable pier blocks 9 years ago- no problems. The only thing I have to say, is that since the pier blocks are above the frost line, all future additions must be above the frost line. My cabin heaves 10-12" each winter, but it does so evenly.
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    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
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    My cabin is 12X20. I used 4 piers on each of the 20' 4X6 skidds. It did a wonderful job of spreading the load. I see the point of concern on the load to the threaded members, however we are not talking about a house. The convenience sure is nice and it's worked well for me.

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    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
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    Attachment 88155

    Thought I'd add a picture.

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    12x20 Cabin with a 12/12 roof and a full loft provides the best square footage for the buck, I've ran the numbers a lot. Pouring your own blocks is easy, just use a old small stopsign for the diagram for the layout. Or cut the bottom of a 55 gal drum off and just pour into that, threaded rods just bend and get screwed up, learned that the hard way.

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Do you have any pics, fishook? I was thinking of doing the 55 gal drum filled with concrete too. My parents have land on Crooked Lake S of Big Lake and the spot I'm going to build is by the lake. Soft, spongy & black spruce.

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    Ours is 12x16, single story, and is on pier blocks with the adjustable brackets. Five blocks on each side, so more than typical for that sized cabin. I've never had to adjust the brackets and they have never bent, broken, or stripped. Near Talkeenta so we've seen some pretty serious snow loads on the roof in past years.

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