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Thread: Treated posts vs other this and that...

  1. #1
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    Default Treated posts vs other this and that...

    My wife and I want to get started on a 12x16 or so cabin in the Petersville area this summer and I keep changing my mid about the foundation.

    I know that we have about 4' of organic material. No rocks or anything and then we hit a firm layer.

    It seems I could have piles driven, or helical piers installed and they would pretty much last forever. But with two man auger auger I could put in pressure treated lumber pretty easily, but I keep thinking wood won't last as long.

    At the end of the day cabin funds come from whats left over after buying groceries and I have 4 hungry kids, so cheaper will get built faster, but I want something done right when all is said and done.

    So with that in mind, is there really any reason not to use pressure treated lumber?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    I think treated 4ft down will outlast you if you keep the water from standing at the top.
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  3. #3
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by samwe View Post
    My wife and I want to get started on a 12x16 or so cabin in the Petersville area this summer and I keep changing my mid about the foundation.

    I know that we have about 4' of organic material. No rocks or anything and then we hit a firm layer.

    It seems I could have piles driven, or helical piers installed and they would pretty much last forever. But with two man auger auger I could put in pressure treated lumber pretty easily, but I keep thinking wood won't last as long.

    At the end of the day cabin funds come from whats left over after buying groceries and I have 4 hungry kids, so cheaper will get built faster, but I want something done right when all is said and done.

    So with that in mind, is there really any reason not to use pressure treated lumber?

    Thanks.
    I am a big fan of wood post foundations....IF they are constructed of the correct grade of lumber, supported on proper footings, damp- proofed, backfilled with appropriate material, and adequately braced. I've replaced a few that weren't.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  4. #4

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    Tarred green logs lasted 30 years on our cabin. 6 foot deep. Now we put pt posts in. Should last 50 years. And why not a 12x20? More room and at very little additional cost.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Personally, I would use cribbing, or post/pier on pad, rather than piles. If you do choose to plant piles, no matter what kind of wood/treatment, wrapping them well (the below ground/ground contact portion) with a waterproofing material such as high quality visqueen or better, to protect them from ground moisture, will make them last much longer.
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  6. #6
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    I think I would install sonotubes with post saddles mounted on top.
    Then either use pt posts or beams depending on your preferred installation.

  7. #7
    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    You will be just fine with treated 8x8's. I rented an auger from Home Depot and did mine all in a day. I used the 10" bit with extension and took it down as far as it would go for each one. If I remember right they are in the ground at least 5'. Being in petersville with snow depth you will want to leave them up some so you aren't digging down to your entrances in the winter. I had a 12x16 cabin and I would really recommend going bigger with a family of 5-6. Your biggest expense will be the siding and roofing. Maybe go two story if you want the extra room as it is usually easier to go up then do a larger foundation. Just make sure you do two foot overhangs everywhere to help keep the water away from the pilings and or gutters help also.


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  8. #8
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    I went to 4 foot overhang, I can stack my firewood real close to the door and it stays dry. I keep it full in the winter and then in the summer I let it stay open and the 4 wheeler can be parked there.

  9. #9
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    There is treated wood and then there is treated wood. Anything rated as: " UC4B Gound Contact Heavy Duty Wood and wood-based material used in contact with the ground in severe environments and in climates with a high potential for deterioration, including permanent wood foundations and wood used in salt-water splash zones."

    I would still put a gravel base or some other bas that will drain water away so the post is not sitting constantly in water.

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  10. #10

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    There is a forum member that built a cabin up in that area with like soil conditions. It 375matt . It is under the cabin section ,post were made 2-6-13 4-4-13 4-6-13 7-8-13 There are others but if you pick up on his thread and follow through you will be able to see how he dealt with things.




    Quote Originally Posted by samwe View Post
    My wife and I want to get started on a 12x16 or so cabin in the Petersville area this summer and I keep changing my mid about the foundation.

    I know that we have about 4' of organic material. No rocks or anything and then we hit a firm layer.

    It seems I could have piles driven, or helical piers installed and they would pretty much last forever. But with two man auger auger I could put in pressure treated lumber pretty easily, but I keep thinking wood won't last as long.

    At the end of the day cabin funds come from whats left over after buying groceries and I have 4 hungry kids, so cheaper will get built faster, but I want something done right when all is said and done.

    So with that in mind, is there really any reason not to use pressure treated lumber?

    Thanks.

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