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Thread: Relocating to kenai

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    Default Relocating to kenai

    Hey everyone, I'm going to be relocating from upstate N.Y to Kenai Alaska in a year or two. Ive got a few questions first though. My plan is to buy land before I relocate. I will be driving my 78 Ford 4x4 pickup and hauling a 28 foot enclosed car trailor. I've been looking on realator websites and I'm seeing alot of parcels for sale. 4-6acres of land for 8-12,000$. Does this sound right to you guys or does the price being that low mean the land is unbuildable? My plan is first year to build a barn that the car trailor will fit in. So I can sleep in it and use a wood stove to heat the barn and the trailor. Also I want to build a chicken coop as I plan to still eat eggs daily. Can I legally sleep in my car trailor if its on my owned land in kenia pennisulia?

    Second is jobs. I know with layoffs within the pipeline as well as military being pulled jobs are scarce. I have experience in machanic(not certified), house construction, basic wiring, roofing, drywall etc.. I'm willing to work in the lumber industry. Pretty much any job I'm willing to work. How is the job scene in kenai? I will have 10-15,000$ in my pocket after my property is paid and all expensive getting to Alaska. That should hold me off for awhile as I plan to go dry cabin living for now to establish a foundation of living. Food will be eggs, fishing, hunting. Only store bought food will be vegetables(first year), canned food, spices etc... I just want to make sure I will be able to find a job, I don't want to die from starvation, freezing or not paying my taxes.

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Get a job lined up before you move!
    Non res hunting & fishing license = $230 see http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...license.prices
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 78fordguy View Post
    Hey everyone, I'm going to be relocating from upstate N.Y to Kenai Alaska in a year or two. Ive got a few questions first though. My plan is to buy land before I relocate. I will be driving my 78 Ford 4x4 pickup and hauling a 28 foot enclosed car trailor. I've been looking on realator websites and I'm seeing alot of parcels for sale. 4-6acres of land for 8-12,000$. Does this sound right to you guys or does the price being that low mean the land is unbuildable? My plan is first year to build a barn that the car trailor will fit in. So I can sleep in it and use a wood stove to heat the barn and the trailor. Also I want to build a chicken coop as I plan to still eat eggs daily. Can I legally sleep in my car trailor if its on my owned land in kenia pennisulia?

    Second is jobs. I know with layoffs within the pipeline as well as military being pulled jobs are scarce. I have experience in machanic(not certified), house construction, basic wiring, roofing, drywall etc.. I'm willing to work in the lumber industry. Pretty much any job I'm willing to work. How is the job scene in kenai? I will have 10-15,000$ in my pocket after my property is paid and all expensive getting to Alaska. That should hold me off for awhile as I plan to go dry cabin living for now to establish a foundation of living. Food will be eggs, fishing, hunting. Only store bought food will be vegetables(first year), canned food, spices etc... I just want to make sure I will be able to find a job, I don't want to die from starvation, freezing or not paying my taxes.
    That highlighted section is going to tell most folks that you've not done your due diligence.

    Best of luck to you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Music Man View Post
    Get a job lined up before you move!
    Non res hunting & fishing license = $230 see http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...license.prices
    I've read that and $230 is fine with me for non resident, I pay double that right now in my licenses for NY and Maine. I know I can't get resident licenses until after a calendar year of jan1-dec31st. I would love to get a job lined up before I move but from what I've read they try to hire residents before non residents and since I'm buying land I want the job to be somewhat within 60 miles of whatever land I buy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    That highlighted section is going to tell most folks that you've not done your due diligence.

    Best of luck to you.
    Why would that be due diligence? Are you saying one can't survive off eggs, hunting and fishing and very limited store bought food? I currently get 1-2 white tail deer and 1 bear in N.Y per year and that meat lasts anywheres from 8-10 months.

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    No deer in Kenai and moose hunting on the Kenai peninsula isn't very good. There are bears but I wouldn't want to try to live off the meat. It takes money to build a barn and buy firewood and pay for the electricity to keep that food from spoiling. A 60 mile drive in the winter here is nothing like NY. You need to do a lot more research before moving here!
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    In every 'moving to alaska' thread there's those that push research research research. But in reality, prior to the internet(20 years ago) there was little research done. Those with the dream went for it.

    With $10-$15k in your pocket and a strong desire to work you'll do fine.

    You might not so much worry about buying land until your established in the working scene.

    Pick an area, preferably one with a strong economy, come on up and rent a dry cabin. If that area doesn't work out it'll be easy to move to the next prospect.

    Odds are you won't get much game meat your first few years here. So count on that.

    Befriend people! Socialize! Offer to help to those that could use it. Many jobs here are gotten by who you know.

    Best of luck on your dream!
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    8-12,000$ for 4-6 acres in the Kenai area is a price for land that will either be all swamp or not road accessable. realistic property prices are going to be more in the 8-13,000$ per acre of raw land on the road system, and that will be on the low side. Bigger chunks of land are going to be less per acre but are going to be a lot more expensive. Also clearing land and making a pad to park your trailer and truck will cost a fair amount as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 78fordguy View Post
    Why would that be due diligence? Are you saying one can't survive off eggs, hunting and fishing and very limited store bought food? I currently get 1-2 white tail deer and 1 bear in N.Y per year and that meat lasts anywheres from 8-10 months.
    If you spend some time and get fishing dialed in, you can expect to put up a good number of fish for the winter. That said, timing can be critical and at certain points of the salmon runs you'll need to put some serious hours into catching your daily limit of 2-3 (depending on the species). Once you're a resident you'll be able to stock the freezer or smoker with dipnet-caught fish (much more efficient if you're serious about living off of what you catch), but that won't be an option for your first year.

    As for living off what you hunt, don't dismiss those that are trying to steer you towards a realistic goal. The moose hunting on the Kenai Peninsula is very difficult at present. Legal bulls are few and far between and hunting pressure is high. Many hunters on the Kenai choose to drive north 6-10+ hours to hunt in other parts of the state due to the current low population. Black bear are plentiful, but they're generally fairly small and you won't want to eat fall bears taken near salmon-producing streams. Fall bears up in the alpine can be great, as can spring bears. Caribou hunting is all by drawing permit and is very difficult with regards to access, sheep hunting is extremely difficult on the Kenai, and almost all goat hunting is by drawing permit only. You can find some decent grouse hunting, and within a few years the hare population should start to rebound, but the idea of living off the land - especially in a fairly populated area of the state such as the Kenai Peninsula - is difficult at best. Lots of fish is your best bet, as game is in short supply and high demand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 0321Tony View Post
    8-12,000$ for 4-6 acres in the Kenai area is a price for land that will either be all swamp or not road accessable. realistic property prices are going to be more in the 8-13,000$ per acre of raw land on the road system, and that will be on the low side. Bigger chunks of land are going to be less per acre but are going to be a lot more expensive. Also clearing land and making a pad to park your trailer and truck will cost a fair amount as well.
    Tony is correct here. Expect to pay 6-10K or more per acre for buildable land, although you may find lower prices per acre when buying a larger parcel. Also many subdivisions have covenants that won't allow what you are proposing. That said, there are plenty of places where you could do exactly as you wish. I know people living in much the same manner as you propose. It is not unreasonable.
    I drove up in 82 with a buddy. No job lined up. Had a few hundred dollars, some tools, and hunting and fishing gear in the back of my truck. I had the advantage of 2 brothers living and working in Kenai. I stayed with one of them. Got a good paying job the day after arriving. Bought a mobile home (yeah that part sucked, but I was living cheap). In a few months the rest of my family came up. (wife and 2 boys) I've been here since. There were some lean times in the mid to late 80's, but I'm doing just fine and have no intention of leaving. (I'm not living in a mobile home now either, LOL)
    IMO this is a good time to be making a play in Alaska, depending on your age. There is a lot of potential on the horizon. Good luck to you. I have a hunch you'll do alright.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I think Brian Nailed it.
    I have lived on the Peninsula since 1997.
    You will not live off the game harvested here on the peninsula unless you are extremely lucky.
    I've never known anyone who does it consistently year to year.
    Those who do live on diets heavy in game meat do so by hunting elsewhere.
    Often by expensive fly out hunts traveling to other areas etc.
    That doesn't mean you can't live your dream but may mean a few changes in your plans.
    A friend recently looked at property in the price range you described here locally.
    It was 90% swamp and he opted to pass on the deal. Be prepared to find such things when your looking and choose carefully.
    While some may say you should just "do it" the more you research you do better prepared you will be and the less headache/heartache you will face.
    When I moved up I had a job offer prior to the move.
    But before I got here the company went bankrupt and the owner skipped town.
    That's not real common but anything can happen at times.
    Fortunately I had a backup plan and was able to make it work out for me anyway. It was a slow start with some low paying jobs at first and without help I would have never made it through.
    Be sure and make some good friends as they will be an immense help to you and often provide sound experienced local advice as well as a warm bed and a meal should something not go as planned.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Thanks everyone for replying. I should have gave more information in my first post. It will be me and my wife moving up. So that's 2 non resident fish&hunt licenses. My truck is old I know. But I just rebuilt the motor bottom up a month ago. So I'm hoping it will be fine. Now my car trailor is a 8.5x28foot enclosed trailor. Inside it is a bed, generator, 4x4 Wheeler, snowmachine, logg splitter, tools, axes, 3 chainsaws and a cheap woodstove amongst other things like clothes and dry food.(I like to stock up on ramen soup in case were ever stranded). Now firewood I plan to cut myself, I've looked up Alaska laws about it. It sais I can get a permit to cut on some state land. And k could always ask the neighbors if they need any trees cut. As far as food spoiling I planned to buy either a propane freezer or an electric one and run a small solar setup only for the freezer.

    I'm willing to work the moment I get into alaska, no matter what the job is. As far as a barn I just want a temporary one since my trailor is 28 feet long and 35 foot barn would be nice. Even if I use reclaimed materials people don't want. I don't plan on buying land without coming up in the summer go look at it first. From what I've read if its swamp land one would need to use pilings to build a house. How would one build a barn then? I can post links to the lands I'm looking at if anyone wants to look. From what I can tell there is a road to the land. Weither its a main road or seasonal road I don't know. But both my truck and Wheeler have plows so I wouldn't mind plowing it. I understand hunting is scarce in kenai, first year the wife and I plan to get a guide for every hunt and we will drive north if needed. How much are dry cabins to rent on the main road system?

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    You will want to check out the guide prices, and the final price of land, check out where you can get your water. Solar does not work well in the winter, and you will have to run your fridge in the winter. It gets warm sometimes during the winter. Most people want to keep their trees for themselves. A lot of people burn wood for their heat. Some sub divisions in the bush have natural gas, but the price per acre is closer to $15,000 to $20,000. As soon as you get property, a road and spot for your barn need to be carved in, most of the equipment can only be hauled in the winter and summer, no spring hauling because the roads are not able to stand the weight during the thaw. It could cost as much as $20,000 to $30,000 for the excavation, rock and layout. Lots of things to look into. Good Luck. Gerberman

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    As for hiring guides for your hunts, you can expect prices of $5-10,000 per hunt, per person - and that's on the lower end of the cost range. It depends on the species and area, of course, but going for guided hunts will eat through your planned financial reserve in no time.

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    My first moose hunt was on the Kenai Peninsula. I hunted about 1 hour and my brother and I each dumped huge bulls. Opening morning. His was 56" mine was 40". Then the packing started. Didn't need a guide. I had a non resident license that year. Your results will likely vary a bit from mine those many years ago. Good luck. Keep up the research.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Here is a couple property's I'm looking at, all are 8,12,000 for 4-10 acres of land. From what I can tell they have road access or within 500 yards of road. The last two, one is wetlands so I assume that it's a swamp? And other I can't tell by the pic if there's any sort of road to it. It would help alot if you guys can look and give tips on these! I really like the one that has 10 acres of land.


    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...a4=&esf=MkE3QQ
    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...w==&esf=MkE3QQ
    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...vM=&esf=MkE3QQ

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    Not to try and talk you out of following your dreams but those properties are that "cheap" for a reason. Most of that land is probably swamp, it is roughly an hour away from where most of the jobs are (in good driving conditions) and I didn't notice any of them having electricity. My advice would be to come a little more prepared is all. Things as simple as gathering a fair amount of firewood around here is just not as simple as you may think. Not to mention jobs going straight down the tube right now.



    Quote Originally Posted by 78fordguy View Post
    Here is a couple property's I'm looking at, all are 8,12,000 for 4-10 acres of land. From what I can tell they have road access or within 500 yards of road. The last two, one is wetlands so I assume that it's a swamp? And other I can't tell by the pic if there's any sort of road to it. It would help alot if you guys can look and give tips on these! I really like the one that has 10 acres of land.


    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...a4=&esf=MkE3QQ
    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...w==&esf=MkE3QQ
    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...vM=&esf=MkE3QQ

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    Yeah 78, you won't be towing your trailer in to any of those properties. If you want to work any kind of a regular schedule, that ain't the place for you. Way back in the sticks. No road maintenance. No road even, maybe a rutted, muddy trail.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 78fordguy View Post
    Here is a couple property's I'm looking at, all are 8,12,000 for 4-10 acres of land. From what I can tell they have road access or within 500 yards of road. The last two, one is wetlands so I assume that it's a swamp? And other I can't tell by the pic if there's any sort of road to it. It would help alot if you guys can look and give tips on these! I really like the one that has 10 acres of land.


    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...a4=&esf=MkE3QQ
    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...w==&esf=MkE3QQ
    http://m.akmls.com/mPropertyDetail.a...vM=&esf=MkE3QQ
    Those lots are all junk.....swampy areas, no road maintenance, no power, and extremely undesirable neighborhoods ...Chakok road, Tall Tree, and Alut ave. are pretty sketchy scenes...lots of drugs, domestic violence, etc...read the trooper reports. I assume you worked hard for your money, make it work for you and invest wisely. Craft a realistic 5-year plan. Contact a realtor to help you find property. Nobody lives by hunting on the KP, it's for fun, but with domestic rabbits, chickens, goats, a greenhouse and dipnet you can live very well, lotsa peeps do it....hard work, though, and many employers wont just let you take off anytime you want to hunt or fish. I've looked at hundreds of properties from Ninilchik to the head of Kachemak bay, if you'd like an assessment of any, pm me...and google "kenai parcel viewer"....it's a great resource.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    If you're hoping to have steady work, perhaps even an oilfield job, and want to live outside of town where you can live in that trailer and build what you want as you wish, then you should be searching in and around Kasilof, Sterling, and Nikiski.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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