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Thread: C-130 Landing strip requirement length........Gravel ????

  1. #1

    Default C-130 Landing strip requirement length........Gravel ????

    OK.......I am reading a novel, and they are landing four C-130 gross load on a dirt runway. I am curious how long the runway needs to be.........???? Assume flat & level dirt surface.....assume zero wind.....assume 60* Temperature and 800 ASL (Just looking for a rough idea of length).

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    All the old oilfield and gold mining herc strips were at least 4000 feet gravel. Most were 5000 feet. Yes you can do shorter but for reliable and taking off with heavy loads you want some distance. Even if the actual strip is 2500 feet you want a mile of no obstacles, makes a huge difference.

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    3500' = Herc Strip. They can do shorter with the load adjusted. In order to utilize max loads, that is the minimum.

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    The landed them on a aircraft carrier and take off. No assist or arrest. 121k lbs I think.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pa18tony View Post
    The landed them on a aircraft carrier and take off. No assist or arrest. 121k lbs I think.
    I saw the video recently. I surmise that their ground speed at touch down was 40-50 knots.

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    I have been on Barter Island dirt strip with a C 130. I believe that one is less then 5000 feet. I am going to guess we used less then 75% of the length for landing and take off.

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    When the aircraft carrier is going 25 knots into a 15 to 20 knot head-wind, the landing distance really shrinks.
    The Barter Island gravel runway is 4,820 feet long.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Thanks everyone, for the information.

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    Back in the 80's (I think) there was an aircraft carrier parked in upper Cook Inlet. I was coming over it, low and wide of it, driving a PA-18-150. The devil in me so badly wanted me to land on the deck. The deck was clear, and I thought it would be fun, to show off what a Super Cub could do, but feared I would get shot down into the cold inlet.


    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    When the aircraft carrier is going 25 knots into a 15 to 20 knot head-wind, the landing distance really shrinks.
    The Barter Island gravel runway is 4,820 feet long.

  11. #11
    Member IndyCzar's Avatar
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    We routinely landed on a crushed coral runway less than 3000 feet in the middle of the pacific ocean...These were older E's and H models...landed on the "first brick" and had to remind each other to use the brakes...If I remember correctly the min speed was 97 kias...lots of gooney birds and a great big antennae just offset of the burnt oil center line...of course that was when wilber was the PIC and orville was giving sink rates, airspeed and distance to touchdown...semper paratus

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    Just noticed this old thread, I'll pull out my 1-1 and run the numbers on it tonight and get back to you

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