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Thread: Ballistic terms I don't care about....

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    Default Ballistic terms I don't care about....

    Ballistic terminology in the shooting world is some thing that is nice to know, but I don't view all of it as a "need to know" for hunting applications for big game. A couple of them I don't consider important are "energy" and "cartridge efficiency". I really don't think they have a real or practical application for big game hunting and are not true indicators of a cartridges performance on big game.

    Trajectory and velocity are important to me, I need to know my bullets trajectory at what ever range I may shoot at and velocity has the most influence on my bullets trajectory. Both are easy to figure out with a chronograph and some range time.

    But, most important to me is my choice of a bullet and how the bullet performs when it hits a big game animal at different velocities. So I have spent most of my 50 + years at the loading bench trying to load up what I thought was the best ammo for the type of shooting and hunting I do. In the end for big game hunting it was all decided for me by the bullets recovered from animals that me, my family and friends shot. If a bullet exited and was not recovered and the animal died quickly the gut pile was always proof enough the chosen "load" worked well. If we found it in the animal and the animal died quickly then that was also proof enough the "chosen" load worked well.

    Boat tail bullets, I am not at all convinced they have any practical advantage over a flat based bullet for any big game hunting.

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    The boat tail will give you a flatter trajectory. Less drag going through the air.
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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Boat tail bullets, I am not at all convinced they have any practical advantage over a flat based bullet for any big game hunting.
    Yep- pure marketing...mostly.

    The difference between a 180gr Nosler Partition (a flat base) and a Trophy Bonded Tipped (a boat-tail) out of a .30-06 is exactly 1" flatter trajectory....at 500 yards.

    Boat tails don't really hurt...but over typical hunting ranges they don't really do much for you. They were created for extended range fire from machine guns...probably a bit better application there than hunting.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    For most hunting situations, most any bullet will kill cleanly and quickly if put in the heart lung area. There are some exceptions. Hollow points and FMJs are normally not good choices. Boat tail or not, not a lot of difference. Premium or not, also not a lot of difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Ballistic terminology in the shooting world is some thing that is nice to know, but I don't view all of it as a "need to know" for hunting applications for big game. A couple of them I don't consider important are "energy" and "cartridge efficiency". I really don't think they have a real or practical application for big game hunting and are not true indicators of a cartridges performance on big game.

    Trajectory and velocity are important to me, I need to know my bullets trajectory at what ever range I may shoot at and velocity has the most influence on my bullets trajectory. Both are easy to figure out with a chronograph and some range time.

    But, most important to me is my choice of a bullet and how the bullet performs when it hits a big game animal at different velocities. So I have spent most of my 50 + years at the loading bench trying to load up what I thought was the best ammo for the type of shooting and hunting I do. In the end for big game hunting it was all decided for me by the bullets recovered from animals that me, my family and friends shot. If a bullet exited and was not recovered and the animal died quickly the gut pile was always proof enough the chosen "load" worked well. If we found it in the animal and the animal died quickly then that was also proof enough the "chosen" load worked well.

    Boat tail bullets, I am not at all convinced they have any practical advantage over a flat based bullet for any big game hunting.
    I agree on ALL points.

    The "Energy" figure is of no value, whatever.

    Hodgeman reflects my understanding of Boat Tail bullet designs.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Its always more interesting for the critter behind the trigger than the one looking down the barrel for sure..
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    I think it all stems from the typical human nature to say things like "I saw this thing where a guy shot X game animal with X bullet at 12,000 yards and killed it clean. If it works at 12,000 yards it must be better at 200 yards right?" Which isn't always true or even necessary. (Yes, I know I exaggerated the 12,000 yards.) My point is, human nature seems to make the leap that top level professional quality match grade extra distance most expensive pro endorsed widgets are the only way to go for my semi-experienced shoots 3 bullets a year hunter. I'm not bashing the "good stuff" just saying it's not necessary.

    I know this is a bit off the topic, but the point is there. I'm a semi-retired USA Ice Hockey referee. (Let my certification lapse but I'll be back next year). I went to a rink years ago for an exercise skate and sat down to put on my skates. A guy walks up with a brand new unopened box of hockey skates and plops down near me. Pulls out an unused pair of latest top of the line pro model $600 hockey skates and proceeds to start lacing them up. Looks at me and says, no joke: "I just started skating and want to learn to play hockey so I bought these skates. I figure the pros use them and I can use any advantage I can get." Gets the skates on and walks out on the ice and immediately falls on his back side. After about a 45 second struggle, he crawls back off the ice and asks me, again no joke: "Do you think I should have these sharpened? I just picked them up today and they don't feel right." Side note, for those not in the know, hockey skates come intentionally dull from the manufacturer since no 2 skaters like the same grind. You have to sharpen them before you use them.

    He got sold on a brand and an image. In fact, he probably would do better to get entry level skates and maybe take the rest of the money to get some lessons... Which is about the same thing most gun owners should probably do. Well that's my 2 cents anyway.

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    I firmly believe that most all missed shots at game animals are the fault of the shooter not the equipment.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post

    Trajectory and velocity are important to me, I need to know my bullets trajectory at what ever range I may shoot at and velocity has the most influence on my bullets trajectory.
    . So I have spent most of my 50 + years at the loading bench trying to load up what I thought was the best ammo for the type of shooting and hunting I do.
    Boat tail bullets, I am not at all convinced they have any practical advantage over a flat based bullet for any big game hunting.
    Could we also make a similar statement:
    Reloading does not have "any practical advantage" over factory ammo.
    The word "practical" being a key part of each statement.
    Trajectory can be determined by shooting paper at different ranges so why would anyone need velocity?

    Not disagreeing, just adding to.

    Rbuck...........come on, certainly few AOD members have missed an animal when it was actually THEIR fault!
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    The problem is many people try and buy skills. They pay big money for a thingamajig that will help shave .020 off thier groups or what ever. We had an older guy in our deer hunting group that shot a .35Rem lever action. No scope. He never stood in a stand. He got a nice buck every year i remember hunting wtih him as i used to help drag it out. He knew how to hunt. he knew how to get close and he could shoot as well as his gun. It never failed him. Also he never failed the gun. I would put my money on him any day over the guy with the 3500.00 rifle. People get way wound up about this bullet or that bullet and get crazy about them. Any good bullet that shoots well will get the job done IF you place it properly. Now if you are going to hunt dangerous critters yes get a super premium bullet but my old Hornady and Remington Core-lokts never let me down. Shot placement is CRUICIAL. Shot placement gets easier when you get closer to the animal. You get closer when you know the animals habits and know how to hunt. you get to know the animals by spending time learning the area you hunt and the animals you are after. You cant buy that in a store!!! .338 you are spot on!

  11. #11

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    Hey Marten Trapper. With some of the factory loads that are available I could spend lots of time and money trying to prove my hand loads are better and probably never do it. I started loading with my Dad about 55 years ago and and I still like loading my own ammo for the 30-06, .338 Win. Mag. and the 45-70. I hope I live long enough to shoot up all my hand loading components!

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