Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: .22 caliber pellet rifles

  1. #1

    Default .22 caliber pellet rifles

    I remember when RWS introduced the model 48 side lever gun. I bought one from Leigh Wilcox of Air Gun Express. I hunted rabbits and squirrel with much success. I let my neighbor kid use it one fall and he had as much success with it as I did. That neighbor kid still has and uses that gun for small game. He mowed my yard one summer when I was on the road splicing fiber optic cable. He refused to take any money for time mowing so I told him to keep the RWS.

    Two years ago I got bit by the pellet gun bug again. The local Walmart had the Benjamin Titan GPS on sale for $125. I bought one and after a long break in period it finally settled down and started hitting where I was looking. I killed numerous rabbits with it last year Even shot a couple on the run with it. I let my grandson shoot it this past summer and forgot to tell him no dry firing. I' m not sure what boke or if it even broke from dry firing. It acts like it is cocked as the ram is clear rearward. However it will not go off or release when the trigger is pulled.

    Richie's Outdoors had brand new Titans on sale for $107 so I picked one up. Now I need to make an attempt to fix the old one.

    The Titan does not operate like the conventional break barrel spring gun but rather has a gas piston set up. Everything I read says you need a special tool to compress the piston in order to dismantle the gun. Obviously I am not going to spend a lot of money on a tool to repair an inexpensive gun. Yet I would pay a reasonable amount to repair the gun to someone who has already invested in the tool and has sufficient knowledge to rebuild the gun.

    Why you ask am I bringing this to this forum. Well, I called two certified Benjamin repair shops and one answered. Something or other's Pawn, Laundrying and Air Gun Service Center. The other concentrated on airguns but $60/hr to work on a 120 dollar gun?

    Any ideas from wisest bunch of gun nuts on the net? Throw it away is what I' m thinking.

  2. #2
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    go to http://castboolits.gunloads.com/foru...hp?182-AirGuns and search. I remember there was a discussion about making a vice to compress the spring.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,599

    Default

    Women that know nothing about guns put them together for less than big bucks. Jump in a see what flies out
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  4. #4
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    A big spring will fly out an cause you serious damage!
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  5. #5
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,382

    Default

    Just buy a German made RWS airgun and don't look back. Keep it properly lubed and maintained, and it will last a couple lifetimes.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    Just buy a German made RWS airgun and don't look back. Keep it properly lubed and maintained, and it will last a couple lifetimes.
    Your right! That RWS 48 was an awsome gun. They run near $500 these days by the time they get them shipped. That being said they are a once and done deal as they do last forever. If the Benjamin Titans last as long as my last one did, which was 2 years I'll go through $500 worth of them in less than a decade and still not have anything to pass onto the kids.

    I am going to take Wills advice and see what makes it tick. It won't be the first wayward spring that I have ducked. If all else fails I'll just drill a fuse hole in the back end of it and make a 22 caliber cannon😉. Make it a short fuse and aim quickly😯.

  7. #7
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    try https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkaEldsPwks
    try www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/06/spring-gun-tuning-part-1
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Music Man View Post
    try https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RkaEldsPwks
    try www.pyramydair.com/blog/2006/06/spring-gun-tuning-part-1
    That's a whole lot more horsing around than I plan to do. I aim to use the ram on my wood splitter to hold the piston in the airgun whilst I remove the bolt that lets everything fly a part. Then I'll back it off gradually. If something gets away from me then we will find it come spring when the snow melts and if not then for sure the first time I mow!😉

  9. #9

    Default

    I tore it all apart. Ya don't need no fancy spring sqwishers or anything of the sort. I just took a 5/8ths inch socket and put it on a block of wood then sat the but end of the receiver down on the socket. The socket was small enough to fit inside the receiver and rest on the plunger that needs compressing. I then just pushed down on the gun with one hand thus compressing the gas piston and taking the pressure off of the pin. With the other hand I pushed out the pin with a punch.

    I discovered that the front seal was cracked. I tried but not real hard to locate a new front seal but the first three places I checked had them on back order. Which tells me that these front seals must be problematic and busticate a whole lot.

    Next time the Eagle hunkers I'm spending some cash on an RWS 48 in 22 caliber.

    An interesting thing that I learned on the pellet gun shooting fraternity forums is that there have been case where someone has committed a boo boo like shooting a cat off a porch. In such instances the seriousness of the charges hinged on an important technicality. If the cat was shot with a 22 caliber pellet gun the offense got treated like it was more offensive if than had it been a 177. I can't see where the size of the hole in the cat matters. The important thing is that he ain't going to pee in the neighbors flower patch any more.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Next time the Eagle hunkers I'm spending some cash on an RWS 48 in 22 caliber.
    Any thought of going to 25 caliber for a hunting gun? I've clanked a whole lot of game with 177 with complete satisfaction, but for some reason the 22's just don't offer enough to reach my wallet. But a bud is real proud of his 25, saying he likes the game performance much more than 22.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    I tore it all apart. Ya don't need no fancy spring sqwishers or anything of the sort. I just took a 5/8ths inch socket and put it on a block of wood then sat the but end of the receiver down on the socket. The socket was small enough to fit inside the receiver and rest on the plunger that needs compressing. I then just pushed down on the gun with one hand thus compressing the gas piston and taking the pressure off of the pin. With the other hand I pushed out the pin with a punch.

    I discovered that the front seal was cracked. I tried but not real hard to locate a new front seal but the first three places I checked had them on back order. Which tells me that these front seals must be problematic and busticate a whole lot.

    Next time the Eagle hunkers I'm spending some cash on an RWS 48 in 22 caliber.

    An interesting thing that I learned on the pellet gun shooting fraternity forums is that there have been case where someone has committed a boo boo like shooting a cat off a porch. In such instances the seriousness of the charges hinged on an important technicality. If the cat was shot with a 22 caliber pellet gun the offense got treated like it was more offensive if than had it been a 177. I can't see where the size of the hole in the cat matters. The important thing is that he ain't going to pee in the neighbors flower patch any more.
    EKC:

    Yew ere a geenyus.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    I bought a couple of pellet guns recently and found out one thing, accuracy from a pellet gun costs a lot more than accuracy from a powder gun. You want to group much under 1" at 20yds you best be willing to part with several C notes.

  13. #13
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I bought a couple of pellet guns recently and found out one thing, accuracy from a pellet gun costs a lot more than accuracy from a powder gun. You want to group much under 1" at 20yds you best be willing to part with several C notes.
    +1....true that. Spring piston guns are also much more sensitive to position and hold than powder guns. For something comparable to powder guns, a pre-charged pneumatic does the trick.... but get ready to spend some dough.

    I've got a Gamo .22 springer and it's ok... grouse and squirrels under 20yds are as good as done. Good groups through require a bunch of hard work.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  14. #14

    Default

    And don't forget the scopes. Pellet guns eat conventional rifle scopes for lunch. Something about the weird backwards recoil (don't recall the details) is heck on crosshairs and more. Fuggedabout slapping a cheap scope on your cheap or expensive air rifle. And certainly don't slap your beloved Leupy on it. Buy a scope specifically designed for air rifles.

    Then there's the issue of scope rings. Scopes will go for a long walk through the rings without just the right rings. Years back I bought my beloved R7 (yeah, several c-notes) and followed advice for the right scope and rings while I was at it. Bud of mine was amazed and inspired by the groups of around 1/4" I was getting at 20 yards. Bought his own R7, but cheaped out on scopes and rings. He cussed and hollered for months until he smarted up and got the right scope and rings. And the R7 is "only" an 800fps 177 cal!

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    And don't forget the scopes. Pellet guns eat conventional rifle scopes for lunch. Something about the weird backwards recoil (don't recall the details) is heck on crosshairs and more. Fuggedabout slapping a cheap scope on your cheap or expensive air rifle. And certainly don't slap your beloved Leupy on it. Buy a scope specifically designed for air rifles.

    Then there's the issue of scope rings. Scopes will go for a long walk through the rings without just the right rings. Years back I bought my beloved R7 (yeah, several c-notes) and followed advice for the right scope and rings while I was at it. Bud of mine was amazed and inspired by the groups of around 1/4" I was getting at 20 yards. Bought his own R7, but cheaped out on scopes and rings. He cussed and hollered for months until he smarted up and got the right scope and rings. And the R7 is "only" an 800fps 177 cal!
    Yup been there and done that BB, only it wasn't a cheap scope my first RWS 48 all those years ago got saddled with a 6x fine wired Weaver that weren't in use at the time. It only lasted a few shots.

    I then bought an RWS scope that came with RWS rings which have the tit poking out the bottom that matches up with a hole in the receiver. That set up last for however long I had that gun with no scope creep.

    I do remember shooting little bitty groups with that gun at squirrel killing distance. I remember that it would shoot through a pine 2x4 when it was new and still would several years later after leaving it for hours on end with the spring compressed. I remember reading that leaving a spring gun cocked for any length of time would mess with the spring memory. The manual that came with the gun recommended leaving the gun uncocked until you were ready to shoot it. Like a squirrel offering you a head shot is going to hold still whilst I cock the lever and insert a pellet and then return the lever to it's cradle. Horse pucky on that noise...I left it cock until the next squirrel.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    ...RWS rings which have the tit poking out the bottom that matches up with a hole in the receiver....
    Them's the ones.

  17. #17
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    +1....true that. Spring piston guns are also much more sensitive to position and hold than powder guns. For something comparable to powder guns, a pre-charged pneumatic does the trick.... but get ready to spend some dough.

    I've got a Gamo .22 springer and it's ok... grouse and squirrels under 20yds are as good as done. Good groups through require a bunch of hard work.
    Yeah, my son and I were hunting with his 177 caliber spring piston air rifle. Not impressed. I noticed a tiny bit of play in the barrel near the cocking mechanism, that can't help accuracy i'd imagine. I guess RWS makes fixed barrel versions, and that they are very accurate guns. I wish I could find a fixed barrel/spring piston 25 caliber!
    Does anyone know the easiest/cheapest method to charge a pre-charged pnuematic air gun?

  18. #18
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Does anyone know the easiest/cheapest method to charge a pre-charged pnuematic air gun?
    Depends on the model... Benjamin Discoveries can be charged with a high pressure hand pump...but it really looks like a lot of work if you're going to do much shooting. The common thing seems to be scuba type tanks that folks charge at places who supply high pressure compressed air for paintball or scuba (more $$$). A tank would last a pretty good while, but any volume of shooting with a .25 is going to eat some air.

    A friend of mine has a Benjamin .25 and a spare tank will last most of a day's shooting.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  19. #19

    Default

    I have a couple high end pre-charged guns, one is a .22 rifle, the other is a .25 bull pup. These guns use air regulators to closely measure the charge of air to supply for each shot. In doing that, a typical full charge of air will net about 45-70 ultra consistent velocity shots before it must be recharged to regain consistency. I use a hand pump capable of 4000psi to charge my guns. These guns are generally less detrimental to scopes than spring piston air rifles. Also, I have a walnut RWS 52 in .177 with a Bushnell 3x9 tactical air rifle scope I no longer use. Might be interested in unloading it. I believe the 52s were 1100 fps guns. I can't remember as I bought it new many years ago.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •