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Thread: Uncle Ed's .270...

  1. #1

    Smile Uncle Ed's .270...

    My Uncle Ed will be 91 today. He is our last surviving WWII vet and at the ripe old age of 18 he went in on a glider early in the morning hours on D Day, with I believe the 82nd Air Borne and spent time with the 101st He and 13 others were the only survivors out of his original 155 man group. He still rides his stationary bike in the winter 3 times a week for about 45 minutes and in the summer he rides his bike to the river for walleye fishing. His mind is sharp and he is a humble mans man.

    I was visiting My Uncle Ed in Iowa a couple of months ago and he mentioned his rifle and that he may be selling it. He called me yesterday and he told me his son and grandson are not interested in the rifle so he is getting it appraised and selling it. I asked him to let me know when he is ready and I will send him a check for the rifle and shipping.

    The rifle is a mint Pre-64 Win. in caliber .270 Win. and he has the original receipt showing he paid a whopping $139.00 for it. I really don't need another rifle at my age and have never had a desire for a .270 Win. as I grew up shooting a 30-06 and have a very nice Pre-64 Featherwight in that caliber. But darn, I just could not stand the thought of one of my hero's rifles going to some one out side of our family. So I will probably "Safe Queen" it along side of my Dad's old Pre-64 in caliber .264 Win. Mag.

    I have a couple of grandsons that we are raising to be men and a gran daughter that is a bit of a tom boy, they will inherit some good guns some day.

    I do have some factory .270 ammo for some reason, so it will get shot when spring comes. I might as well see if it likes 140 grain Barnes X or 150 grain Nosler Partition bullets while I'm at it. And so it begins again......

  2. #2
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    And so it begins again......
    As it should be. You made the right decision....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  3. #3
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Good on you, 338! I would have had to do the same.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    I have no particular love for a 270, either, BUT since it belongs to your Uncle, and he is IMO, a War Hero, it is a treasure.

    However, your Uncle, himself, is an even Greater Treasure. Thank God for him and folks like him.

    If I were you, I'd gather all his history, emphasizing his Military Service, and keep that in a folder along with the rifle. So that his memory, and that of so many like him will be preserved along with that rifle.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  5. #5
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    I have taken old family guns out hunting. BTW love the .270. I've taken bears, moose, dall sheep, elk, and literally a mountain of deer with a .270. I was fortunate enough to kill a caribou with a Winchester model 95 in .405 that has been used by 5 generations and counting in my family. Great grandpa bought it after being told by Teddy Roosevelt in a personal letter what a great gun it was. Roosevelt wanted great grandpa to join the Rough Riders, hence the letters.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    However, your Uncle, himself, is an even Greater Treasure. Thank God for him and folks like him.
    You said a mouthful there my friend...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7

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    Yup, Bub you can't let that rifle get away. Your uncle is an icon and he has my utmost respect. That rifle is a nice piece but knowing the story behind the man that owned it makes it a treasure.

  8. #8
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    Well done and thanks for sharing! Some things in life have tremendous value your uncle is one of them! Hats off to the Man and to you for what you are doing!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  9. #9

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    I have lots of information on Uncle Ed. From his growing up with my Dad, through their early Golden Gloves boxing days, to a few rowdy nights they had after the war, my poor Mom was not happy with them. I remember pheasant hunts and I remember him and Dad telling me bout D Day,
    The Battle of the Bulge, and the push to secure bridges and the machine gun bullet hitting him in the head and eventually costing him an eye, but he stayed in the fight.

    Years ago they flew him and a few others survivors from his group to Washington DC etc. When I left after my visit he was looking for a new muzzle loader to blast one of them Iowa bucks with as he was having trouble drawing his bow. His letters home to his Mom and Dad during WWII are treasures. Never a gripe and no gore stories in front of women. Every family should be blessed with an "Uncle Ed".

    I love Uncle Ed and every thing about him. We will, Lord willing, make a gut pile with that rifle.

  10. #10
    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    Some of the comments on this thread probably have ol' Jack O'Connor rolling in his grave! You made the right decision, no doubt. I'm fairly familiar with the .270 Win. Take it out and shoot it and you might find you like it. Hopefully you'll make a gut pile with that wonderful old rifle?
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I have lots of information on Uncle Ed. From his growing up with my Dad, through their early Golden Gloves boxing days, to a few rowdy nights they had after the war, my poor Mom was not happy with them. I remember pheasant hunts and I remember him and Dad telling me bout D Day,
    The Battle of the Bulge, and the push to secure bridges and the machine gun bullet hitting him in the head and eventually costing him an eye, but he stayed in the fight.

    Years ago they flew him and a few others survivors from his group to Washington DC etc. When I left after my visit he was looking for a new muzzle loader to blast one of them Iowa bucks with as he was having trouble drawing his bow. His letters home to his Mom and Dad during WWII are treasures. Never a gripe and no gore stories in front of women. Every family should be blessed with an "Uncle Ed".

    I love Uncle Ed and every thing about him. We will, Lord willing, make a gut pile with that rifle.
    I bet we all would have enjoyed his company it we ever had the privilege of meeting him.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  12. #12

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    As a special treat, pick up a copy (or download it) of the Band of Brothers for your Uncle.

    Suspect it will be the highlight of 2016 for him.

  13. #13

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    We have the Band of Brothers and Uncle Ed has seen it. So what is your guys favorite .270 bullet for Alaskan hunting?

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    So what is your guys favorite .270 bullet for Alaskan hunting?
    Mine begins and ends with the 150 grain Partition. Haven't found a single reason to make me us anything else in 270.

    Hats off to you for your relationship with your uncle and valuing his place in the world. Not enough of that going around. That rifle is the perfect memorial.

  15. #15

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    I have my dad's deer rifle, a custom model 98 Mauser with a mid weight Douglas barrel in .270 win. It is a very fine, good shooting gun and he shot 150 gr. factory bullets in it. He did not reload and thought reloads were not as good as a factory load but it is no telling how many deer he killed with it. It is still a very good gun and I take it out to shoot at times but I do not hunt with it. This gun is priceless to me and I think to much of it to take a chance on something happening to it while hunting.

  16. #16
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Mine begins and ends with the 150 grain Partition. Haven't found a single reason to make me use anything else in 270.
    Yup. That's about right.

  17. #17
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    Your Uncle Ed is wonderful. I have many older friends, a few of which served faithfully. They are a national treasure. Hero's for sure. I don't think we honor them enough. We would not be speaking English if it weren't for them.
    Best wishes on the rifle. Send my sincerest thank you for serving to your Uncle, although if he is like the others I know, he will just say sure, as they sacrifice so much for us, willingly. Makes me weep, they are so noble. If in some degree we can honor them with how we live our lives...
    re

  18. #18
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    I use the Speer 150gr BTSP in my 270 and have shot 5 or 6 moose with it. It works very well.

    My "uncle Ed" was my dad. While I was growing up he would tell many stories of his adventures from Normandy to Germany during WWII. He was with Patton's 3rd Army, 4th armored infantry, 24th armored engineers battalion as a recon officer. He told of the three day march to Bastogne as well as many other experiences. I have his 1917 enfield he bought for $7.50 trough the NRA in 1937. It will be passed on to one of my grandkids. It would be a shame to have one of these special guns end up in the hands of some bubba that does not have the history or the family connection.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    It would be a shame to have one of these special guns end up in the hands of some bubba that does not have the history or the family connection.
    Or worse yet, a "trophy" in the hands of some speculating collector, never to be shot again. Makes me absolutely goofy to see honorable arms turned into Beany Babies and denied their rightful role of sending bullets downrange and game to the freezer.

  20. #20

    Default Will be shot...

    The .270 will be shot and gut piles will be made! My Uncle Ed told me they were cold and hungry at Bastogne, conserving ammo and wishing the longest week of their lives would end. I'm glad I missed it.

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