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Thread: Tikka discharged out of battery

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Default Tikka discharged out of battery

    My Tikka T3 discharged while unloading it during a recent deer hunt. The bolt was half way back when it fired. Tikka wants to see the rifle, so I'll be shipping it off to them shortly. Has anybody heard of any similar issues with Tikka rifles?
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you can’t tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

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    I'm not familiar with Tikka rifles but I would not have thought it possible for the firing pin to go forward with the bolt handle up unless something broke. And, yeah, I'll bet they want to see it

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Nope. No issues here.
    Now what ?

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    Whew, I bet that rocked your hand a good one... glad nobody was hurt...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    Whew, I bet that rocked your hand a good one... glad nobody was hurt...
    I was thinking the same thing...... What caliber Rod?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Several of my friends hunt with T-3's, and there are no reported problems from them. I have a 595 with no problems. Glad no one was hurt Rod. From your description "the bolt was half-way back when it fired", it sounds like the cartridge was being extracted from the chamber and partially extracted when it fired, is that correct? If so, man oh man does that sound scary. I'm trying to imagine possible scenarios for that malfunction as I'm real curious what happened, but I'll refrain from asking questions. Please let us know what you hear from them. Again, glad no one was hurt.

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    Sounds like a Hang fire.

    Smitty of the North
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    Member Yellowknife's Avatar
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    Never heard of that. Took a look at my bolt, and for the firing pin to drop while out of battery it would need to either be massively out of spec or have some large foreign object wedged in the notch. Basically it's a similar design to every other bolt action I have.

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    Classic Hang fire is delayed ignition.

    When you have what seems to be a miss fire, you're supposed to wait a long time before opening the action.

    Believe it or not, heard of it or not, Hang fires can "Hang" for a very long time.

    Smitty of the North
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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Sorry for the lack of description and pictures. I'll try to get some pics soon. As to a description of what happened...

    My brother had been using my Tikka T3 in 270win. He had a round in the chamber, and we were heading back from an unsuccessful day of hunting. So, he dropped the magazine and proceeded to remove the round in the chamber (I was watching this all happen). He held the rifle with his left hand over the mag well and ejection port to catch the ejected round while he drew the bolt back with his right hand. As he drew the bolt back, the live round fired. The primer blew out and unburnt powder is now all over the in the action. The bolt was back far enough when the round discharged, the neck expanded just in front of the locking lugs, and the brass is now stuck there. The bullet is lodged in the barrel just beyond the chamber. When we removed the bolt from the rifle, the cocking mechanism was turned 90 degrees and the firing pin was protruding from the face of the bolt.

    It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Sorry for the lack of description and pictures. I'll try to get some pics soon. As to a description of what happened...

    My brother had been using my Tikka T3 in 270win. He had a round in the chamber, and we were heading back from an unsuccessful day of hunting. So, he dropped the magazine and proceeded to remove the round in the chamber (I was watching this all happen). He held the rifle with his left hand over the mag well and ejection port to catch the ejected round while he drew the bolt back with his right hand. As he drew the bolt back, the live round fired. The primer blew out and unburnt powder is now all over the in the action. The bolt was back far enough when the round discharged, the neck expanded just in front of the locking lugs, and the brass is now stuck there. The bullet is lodged in the barrel just beyond the chamber. When we removed the bolt from the rifle, the cocking mechanism was turned 90 degrees and the firing pin was protruding from the face of the bolt.

    It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen.
    Anything mechanical is capable of breaking. In this case there is a chance to study it and get it corrected without someone getting hurt. I am glad you guys are ok....could have been bad.

    What I can't understand is where did all the pressure go. The case was swelled and had a primer knocked out? Normally in that situation you would have never found the brass other than what would be lodged in your brothers hand. The pressure did not go down the barrel or the bullet wouldn't still be lodged.

    tikka makes a heck of a gun and I'm not going to be quick to fault them. I am not going to fault your brother either. Maybe the firing pin didn't get tempered right, got damaged before it was installed. My guess (not being familiar with Tikka bolts) is that the button/ notch/whatever that holds the firing pin/spring back broke.

    Nearly every manual that comes with a new gun these days tells you to wear safety glasses while shooting the gun. First time I saw that I thought, now why would they put that into print...are they telling me that sometimes these things come apart? I think it's because regardless of how hard they try to maintain the strictest levels of quality control human interaction into the process is inevitable and we all know to error is human.

    I'd like to hear what gunbugs and Andy Fields have to say about this!

    After thinking about this and thinking about how well the Tikka appears to be built, makes me wonder if I should throw my Savage BMag in the dumpster. It is the cheapest made firearm that I have ever had my hands on. So far it functions flawlessly and shoots MOA but is uglier than a red headed step child after gang initiation. the Tikkas are beautiful ergonomically.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Wow- glad you guys are OK. That could have been a bad deal in a lot of ways.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Thanks for the explanation Rod...really intriguing...such a low probability scenario. I'll say again that I'm real glad to hear that no one was hurt. Your brother should buy a lottery ticket...he beat the odds in that scenario...twice.

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    What the heck, just when I thought I had heard it all. Glad to hear no one was seriously injured. Please let us know what the factory says. That is really odd. Maybe a little "Google" detective work is in order to see if similar problems are reported.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Sorry for the lack of description and pictures. I'll try to get some pics soon. As to a description of what happened...

    My brother had been using my Tikka T3 in 270win. He had a round in the chamber, and we were heading back from an unsuccessful day of hunting. So, he dropped the magazine and proceeded to remove the round in the chamber (I was watching this all happen). He held the rifle with his left hand over the mag well and ejection port to catch the ejected round while he drew the bolt back with his right hand. As he drew the bolt back, the live round fired. The primer blew out and unburnt powder is now all over the in the action. The bolt was back far enough when the round discharged, the neck expanded just in front of the locking lugs, and the brass is now stuck there. The bullet is lodged in the barrel just beyond the chamber. When we removed the bolt from the rifle, the cocking mechanism was turned 90 degrees and the firing pin was protruding from the face of the bolt.

    It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen.
    I think you've figured it out.... Pretty good analysis there.

    "It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen."

    Now, I'm thinking that if the firing pin had let go sooner when the round was more into the chamber, but unsupported by the open bolt, it could have been much worse, because the pressure would have been more contained. I'm glad it turned out as well as it did.

    NOW, I remember, I had a "New Model 70" one time and the notch on the bolt was not deep enough and sometimes the firing pin wasn't held securely in the cocked position, and sometimes it moved out of position. I noticed it, and took it to a gunsmith.

    I thought the bolt would be hardened and it would take some doin but he just grabbed a rat tailed file and made the notch deeper.

    (When those "New Model 70s" came out in 64, many of them were very poorly made.)

    Thanks for posting this. It's important to know that what seems to be impossible, isn't.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Sorry for the lack of description and pictures. I'll try to get some pics soon. As to a description of what happened...

    My brother had been using my Tikka T3 in 270win. He had a round in the chamber, and we were heading back from an unsuccessful day of hunting. So, he dropped the magazine and proceeded to remove the round in the chamber (I was watching this all happen). He held the rifle with his left hand over the mag well and ejection port to catch the ejected round while he drew the bolt back with his right hand. As he drew the bolt back, the live round fired. The primer blew out and unburnt powder is now all over the in the action. The bolt was back far enough when the round discharged, the neck expanded just in front of the locking lugs, and the brass is now stuck there. The bullet is lodged in the barrel just beyond the chamber. When we removed the bolt from the rifle, the cocking mechanism was turned 90 degrees and the firing pin was protruding from the face of the bolt.

    It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen.
    Sorry Rod, I missed this post prior to making my last post. Sounds like you have figured out what ran amuck. Now it's up to Tikka to figure out why.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Sorry for the lack of description and pictures. I'll try to get some pics soon. As to a description of what happened...

    My brother had been using my Tikka T3 in 270win. He had a round in the chamber, and we were heading back from an unsuccessful day of hunting. So, he dropped the magazine and proceeded to remove the round in the chamber (I was watching this all happen). He held the rifle with his left hand over the mag well and ejection port to catch the ejected round while he drew the bolt back with his right hand. As he drew the bolt back, the live round fired. The primer blew out and unburnt powder is now all over the in the action. The bolt was back far enough when the round discharged, the neck expanded just in front of the locking lugs, and the brass is now stuck there. The bullet is lodged in the barrel just beyond the chamber. When we removed the bolt from the rifle, the cocking mechanism was turned 90 degrees and the firing pin was protruding from the face of the bolt.

    It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen.

    Glad no one was hurt. Had a similar situation occur with myself and my wife 21 years ago, but with a Colt 1903 Pocket Pistol .32. I had dropped the magazine, was pulling the slide back when it fired and the casing all flew back at roughly a 135 degree angle striking my wife (then girlfriend) in the leg. We found the bullet, still attached to the casing, and it completely passed through her leg just below her knee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hudge View Post
    Glad no one was hurt. Had a similar situation occur with myself and my wife 21 years ago, but with a Colt 1903 Pocket Pistol .32. I had dropped the magazine, was pulling the slide back when it fired and the casing all flew back at roughly a 135 degree angle striking my wife (then girlfriend) in the leg. We found the bullet, still attached to the casing, and it completely passed through her leg just below her knee.
    That's scary. I think I'll go home now. This stuff is way over my head.

    SOTN
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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod in Wasilla View Post
    Sorry for the lack of description and pictures. I'll try to get some pics soon. As to a description of what happened...

    My brother had been using my Tikka T3 in 270win. He had a round in the chamber, and we were heading back from an unsuccessful day of hunting. So, he dropped the magazine and proceeded to remove the round in the chamber (I was watching this all happen). He held the rifle with his left hand over the mag well and ejection port to catch the ejected round while he drew the bolt back with his right hand. As he drew the bolt back, the live round fired. The primer blew out and unburnt powder is now all over the in the action. The bolt was back far enough when the round discharged, the neck expanded just in front of the locking lugs, and the brass is now stuck there. The bullet is lodged in the barrel just beyond the chamber. When we removed the bolt from the rifle, the cocking mechanism was turned 90 degrees and the firing pin was protruding from the face of the bolt.

    It seems to me that the cocking mechanism slipped off of the detent on the bolt and released the firing pin as the bolt was removed, but I have no idea how or why that would happen.
    I have a T-3 in a 270, so very interested in the final verdict. I have done the same thing (or very similar) with my Sako, its rather awkward to operate the bolt with the right hand and catch the round in the left hand, unless the barrel is/was resting on something. Assume this was scoped... never seen a Tika that wasnt?

    Was he supporting the weight of the rifle with the left hand?

    Not disagreeing, just trying to get the whole picture...
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    I have a T-3 in a 270, so very interested in the final verdict. I have done the same thing (or very similar) with my Sako, its rather awkward to operate the bolt with the right hand and catch the round in the left hand, unless the barrel is/was resting on something. Assume this was scoped... never seen a Tika that wasnt?

    Was he supporting the weight of the rifle with the left hand?

    Not disagreeing, just trying to get the whole picture...
    Yes, the rifle is scoped.
    Yes, he was supporting the weight of the rifle with his left hand as he operated the bolt with his right hand. The barrel was unsupported.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you can’t tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

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