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Thread: Grizzlystik arrows

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    Default Grizzlystik arrows

    I'm going to be buying a new bow hunting setup with my tax return this year and have been thinking about going with Grizzlystik arrows along with the Ashby broadhead. I'll be shooting them from a 70# compound bow. I've read mixed reviews about shooting them from a compound. It seems like most of the negative stuff said about them was due to straightness issues. Also some of that is a bit dated so maybe that is no longer an issue?

    Does anyone here use these with a compound bow, if so what have your experiences been? Will the local bow shops help tune the bow with these arrows if the bow is purchased at the shop? I've read on their site that due to the taper the nocking point needs to be moved this is all stuff the shop can figure out as far as were the nocking point should be correct?

    Are there any other arrows I should look at that are heavier and use the EFOC concept?

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    I did an internet search just for kicks. Nothing about anyone using them in a compound. For the price? Wow!! They are really proud of them. I use Carbon Express Maximum Blue Streak Selects - 350 at 28" and 125 grain Monotec G5 broad heads. My bow was setup for 68 pounds in Africa. Zebra, Baboon, Kudu, Warthog and Gemsbok - Complete pass through. Waterbuck, Blue Wildebeest I hit the opposite leg exiting (Kill zones on Africa game are different, lower and more to the front.)

    The one moose I have taken with the bow, complete pass through at 28 yards.

    If your looking at game bigger than these animals then maybe you need the Grizzly Sticks. But for most hunting around here, probably not.

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    So does that mean your arrow shafts alone are 350 gr or that also includes with the broadhead? I'll be using it on moose and hopefully bear depending on if I get any of the tags I put in for so I'll be using them on the same size animals as you. I've been doing a lot of reading into arrows and heads, I'm not stuck on the grizzlystiks as you pointed out they're really expensive. I would like to use a heavy arrow though with a big two blade broadhead.

    I've also looked at arrow dynamics. Do most of the people that shoot a heavy arrow use a heavy arrow or just get there with a heavy head and inserts?

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    Call me old school, but I still use aluminum arrows on moose. I often get complete pass through shots. My bow is cranked up to almost 80#.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMhunts View Post
    So does that mean your arrow shafts alone are 350 gr or that also includes with the broadhead? I'll be using it on moose and hopefully bear depending on if I get any of the tags I put in for so I'll be using them on the same size animals as you. I've been doing a lot of reading into arrows and heads, I'm not stuck on the grizzlystiks as you pointed out they're really expensive. I would like to use a heavy arrow though with a big two blade broadhead.

    I've also looked at arrow dynamics. Do most of the people that shoot a heavy arrow use a heavy arrow or just get there with a heavy head and inserts?
    350 is the code for the spine or weight selection. 250 lighter, 450 heavier. 350 Is for between 60-70 if I remember correctly.

    My arrow weight including broad heads is about 405 grains. Which is what I took to Africa.(You can buy weight insert tubes in I think 3, 5, 8 grain per inch that will increase weight. In other words with the arrow insert tubes in I have 550 grain arrows. Way more than enough, but if I draw a buffalo tag, I'll use them.)

    Some people like 100 grain broad heads. I prefer 125's. I HATE EXPANDABLE BROAD HEADS. Enough said. Best thing is to borrow several types, try them and see what fly's best for you with the arrows you select.

    Not everything fly's the same. I bought some 125 gr. VAP bh for Africa and they just did not fly as reliable as my standby Monotec G5's or NAP Hellraisers.

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    I believe expandable heads are not legal for moose. I also stay away from the lightest broad heads. I shoot 125 grain 4 blade Satellite Aero with the .010 thick stainless razor inserts. Slices them up. Very durable, and great penetration.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Carbon arrows are either straight or broken. Aluminum not so much.

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    I've got 1/2 dozen Grizzlies that I have been shooting from my 50# longbow. They shoot fine, but feel very heavy. I only play around with them since I get much better flight from my Axis Nanos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    I've got 1/2 dozen Grizzlies that I have been shooting from my 50# longbow. They shoot fine, but feel very heavy. I only play around with them since I get much better flight from my Axis Nanos.

    are the axis nanos a heavy arrow?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BMhunts View Post
    are the axis nanos a heavy arrow?
    I don't remember the gpi, but they are definitely lighter than the Grizzlies. They are a narrower profile too.
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    GPI depends on the spine of the arrow. There are a lot of options out there and something to suit everyone's different opinions and wants/needs in an arrow. We'd be glad to help you tune your bow to whatever arrow you decide.
    The Grizzlysticks I've seen come through the shop haven't been very straight, that's just MY opinion. Normally, the price of the arrow goes up with straightness.
    Arrows and broadheads will always be like Ford vs. Chevy vs. Dodge vs. Whatever.
    Stop by the shop and chat soon if you have time.

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    I roll my aluminum arrows across a flat surface before they get qualified to hunt with. Any that don't make the grade get demoted to the grouse shooting quiver and a rubber blunt attached. As mentioned in other threads, I also spray silicone lube on my arrows before hunting with them. I am convinced beyond doubt that it increases penetration. Field tests when target shooting carry this theory out.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    BMHunts: Sounds like you have a lot of questions and are fairly new to archery. My suggestion to you is to stop at Full Curl Archery on Old Seward Hwy. They are very capable and will answer all of your questions. I know there are other shops out their. Just dealing with my personal experiences.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I roll my aluminum arrows across a flat surface before they get qualified to hunt with. Any that don't make the grade get demoted to the grouse shooting quiver and a rubber blunt attached. As mentioned in other threads, I also spray silicone lube on my arrows before hunting with them. I am convinced beyond doubt that it increases penetration. Field tests when target shooting carry this theory out.
    I spin test even my carbons with the broad heads attached. It is quite possible to hit one with another bh or have one that is not true. Better to be safe than sorry.

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    Yeah I used to bow hunt when I was younger but am coming back after a long hiatus. In researching what all the latest and greatest is in bowhunting I ran across the penetration tests done by Dr. Ashby. After reading all the reports I'm pretty much sold on heavy arrows with large cut on contact broadheads. That's what lead me to the Grizzlystiks. I'm going to visit some of the bow shops and get setup for this up coming season. Thanks for everyone's reply's. If anyone else has any experience with grizzlystiks or has a different heavy arrow setup I'd like to hear about it, and what your experience has been.

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    I use a carbon express Pile Driver 450 with a 150 grain head through my compound. Finished arrow weight is like 525 gr. I was going to go with the GS but there were no local vendors.
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    Expandables are legal for moose.
    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I believe expandable heads are not legal for moose. I also stay away from the lightest broad heads. I shoot 125 grain 4 blade Satellite Aero with the .010 thick stainless razor inserts. Slices them up. Very durable, and great penetration.

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    Quote Originally Posted by woundedknee View Post
    Expandables are legal for moose.
    They may be legal, ethical is another thing. I hate them, won't use them and if I could ban them from hunting. I see way too many hunting shows where the archer gets no penetration and saw one girl, bounce an arrow off a deer at 15 yards. In my own experience, I have nearly lost three due to expendables not penetrating on broadside shots and then turning 90 degrees after entering. I watched my son shoot a deer three times with Rages. Nope, don't like them at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Carbon arrows are either straight or broken. Aluminum not so much.
    It would be more accurate to say good carbon arrows are straight. The manufacturing process definitely produces arrows that don't meet the +\- tolerances for the brand. Those arrows are sold to other companies and rebranded/sold. For instance, Cabelas buys seconds (arrows that don't meet primary tolerances) from Easton and sold under Cabelas brand for much cheaper than Easton sells theirs. Look at the specs and you'll see the difference. If you spin test a dozen Cabelas arrows, you'll likely find less than half are "straight".

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    If you have a bunch of money to burn I would say try them. There are a hundred other options for way less money. If your shooting a modern compound I don't see where the EFOC is much of a advantage. Now if you shoot a bow that is sub 200 feet per second like mine you will see some benefits.

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