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Thread: The smartest guys I know

  1. #1
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    Default The smartest guys I know

    I used to think my son was the smartest guy I knew. He rebuilt his first snow machine engine at the age of 8 and is now a nuclear propulsion officer in the navy (runs the reactor on a submarine). Those guys are in the top tenth of a percent of smart guys on the planet. He's home on leave for the holidays right now.
    A few days ago I was down at work in the lower 48 when my wife told me there was snow in the forecast. I called my son and asked him to put the covers on the airplane (super cub) for me. A few hours later he called back and said he got the engine and wing covers on but couldn't figure out how to put the tail covers on.
    So to those of you who are able to put covers on the tail of their cub, you are truly the smartest guys I know!

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    So, I have philosophical question....I'm not sure if I can't or simply don't often put covers on the back end of the -12: oh, wait, it's hangared so I don't do much covering...nor much flying right now

    It's near the witching hour (meaning quitting time in the holiday season) in Ewe-stun, hence philosophical questions!

    Philosophical question: Unlike some other tailfeathers, the -12 stabilizer and elevators are uniform in shape (i.e. no airfoil). When one adjusts the trim on the -12 (or -18), what that does is changes the angle of the stabilizer to become more acute or more obtuse relative to the direction of travel / relative wind. When one pushes that magic stick forward, it changes the angle of the elevators so that they deflect the air more or less or to a different direction. Trim adjustment or elevator movement all affect the flight of the aircraft by impinging the direction of airflow, not through a Bernoulli principle thing or a venturi effect.

    IF all of the foregoing is accurate (and in the time of philosophical musings, it may not be), then does it also mean that there is no problem with altered airflow over the tailfeathers such as frost may cause on wings? Similarly, the problem of possible airflow separation isn't the same on the tailfeathers? Similarly, the change in shape of the airflow isn't a problem for the tailfeathers?

    ....so, other than making it easier (maybe) to remove snow, why cover tailfeathers?

    Philisophical questioning over.

  3. #3
    Member Barnstormer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Mauler View Post
    I used to think my son was the smartest guy I knew. He rebuilt his first snow machine engine at the age of 8 and is now a nuclear propulsion officer in the navy (runs the reactor on a submarine). Those guys are in the top tenth of a percent of smart guys on the planet. He's home on leave for the holidays right now.
    A few days ago I was down at work in the lower 48 when my wife told me there was snow in the forecast. I called my son and asked him to put the covers on the airplane (super cub) for me. A few hours later he called back and said he got the engine and wing covers on but couldn't figure out how to put the tail covers on.
    So to those of you who are able to put covers on the tail of their cub, you are truly the smartest guys I know!
    Before I joined the Army many many many many many many years ago I thought of joining the Navy, and after taking the entrance tests they wanted to send me to reactor school. I can put tail covers on a cub, so I guess I'm one of the smartest guys you know. But imagine if I'd also gone to the Navy's reactor school. Heck I would have retired from the Navy a General for sure! And don't even go there questioning my intelligence going into the Army instead. ;-)

    But in all seriousness, thanks to your son for serving our country.
    Phil Whittemore
    If you're not living on the edge you're taking up too much space.

    https://share.delorme.com/PhilWhittemore

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by pa12drvr View Post
    So, I have philosophical question....I'm not sure if I can't or simply don't often put covers on the back end of the -12: oh, wait, it's hangared so I don't do much covering...nor much flying right now

    It's near the witching hour (meaning quitting time in the holiday season) in Ewe-stun, hence philosophical questions!

    Philosophical question: Unlike some other tailfeathers, the -12 stabilizer and elevators are uniform in shape (i.e. no airfoil). When one adjusts the trim on the -12 (or -18), what that does is changes the angle of the stabilizer to become more acute or more obtuse relative to the direction of travel / relative wind. When one pushes that magic stick forward, it changes the angle of the elevators so that they deflect the air more or less or to a different direction. Trim adjustment or elevator movement all affect the flight of the aircraft by impinging the direction of airflow, not through a Bernoulli principle thing or a venturi effect.

    IF all of the foregoing is accurate (and in the time of philosophical musings, it may not be), then does it also mean that there is no problem with altered airflow over the tailfeathers such as frost may cause on wings? Similarly, the problem of possible airflow separation isn't the same on the tailfeathers? Similarly, the change in shape of the airflow isn't a problem for the tailfeathers?

    ....so, other than making it easier (maybe) to remove snow, why cover tailfeathers?

    Philisophical questioning over.
    I don't have the answer, but just a thought: People put VG's on the underside of the stabilizer to keep the airflow attached to the elevator at aft deflection. If this actually works (I believe it does) than that would show that the boundary layer airflow on the tail feathers does play some role in the effectiveness or lack thereof.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Mauler View Post
    I used to think my son was the smartest guy I knew. He rebuilt his first snow machine engine at the age of 8 and is now a nuclear propulsion officer in the navy (runs the reactor on a submarine). Those guys are in the top tenth of a percent of smart guys on the planet. He's home on leave for the holidays right now.
    A few days ago I was down at work in the lower 48 when my wife told me there was snow in the forecast. I called my son and asked him to put the covers on the airplane (super cub) for me. A few hours later he called back and said he got the engine and wing covers on but couldn't figure out how to put the tail covers on.
    So to those of you who are able to put covers on the tail of their cub, you are truly the smartest guys I know!
    while this is worth a good chuckle, my hats off to your son for doing what he does to keep "our" chunk of this rock safe and protect us from those who want to do us harm. thank you, sir.

  6. #6
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    My son is an academy ring knocker. These days he is a licensed skipper for unlimited tonnage ships.
    When I asked him to tow my floats home on their trailer, he managed to bust out both tail lights on my old Dodge one-ton and he pulled the pin out oif the reciever hitch instead of disconnecting the ball. What the heck....???
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    My son is an academy ring knocker. These days he is a licensed skipper for unlimited tonnage ships.
    When I asked him to tow my floats home on their trailer, he managed to bust out both tail lights on my old Dodge one-ton and he pulled the pin out oif the reciever hitch instead of disconnecting the ball. What the heck....???
    It's all your fault, poor parenting
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=Float Pilot;1515669]My son is an academy ring knocker. These days he is a licensed skipper for unlimited tonnage ships.
    When I asked him to tow my floats home on their trailer, he managed to bust out both tail lights on my old Dodge one-ton and he pulled the pin out oif the reciever hitch instead of disconnecting the ball. What the heck....???[/QUOTE I like that ^^^ Apparently pulling the pin makes to most sense to a really smart guy. Maybe we have been doing it wrong all along. Not commenting on the broken lights though. LOL
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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