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Thread: Anyone have photos of Blown Exhaust Gaskets or cracked exhaust pipes?

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default Anyone have photos of Blown Exhaust Gaskets or cracked exhaust pipes?

    I thought I had some old burned out gaskets out in my shop as demo examples, but they appear to have been tossed in the trash during a recent cleaning frenzy.

    Anyone have any pics I can used for an exhaust leak article?
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  2. #2

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    Here are a couple of the crack on my J3 from last summer. Sneaky one, was very hard to see unless you took the cowling off. Had a CO indicator turn dark and that got me taking a closer look.

    Attachment 87721Attachment 87722

  3. #3

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    No that's really crazy, how would that even happen?

  4. #4

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    Collector on my 180 last year. Replaced all that and this year my muffler was bubbled and needed replacing.image.jpg

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    My article has been submitted,

    Here is an example of a C-180 with a bad gasket. Lots of black carbon.

    And there was an added surprise inside the muffler. All if the baffles had corroded away.. There was NOTHING inside.

    The previous owner used the poor plane like a rented piece of heavy equipment.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  6. #6

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    But how does that even happen, aren't those exhausts stainless steel? Alaska is a dry climate where is the water even coming from?

    Are these planes coming up from the lower 48? Water in the gas?

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    My article has been submitted,

    Here is an example of a C-180 with a bad gasket. Lots of black carbon.

    And there was an added surprise inside the muffler. All if the baffles had corroded away.. There was NOTHING inside.

    The previous owner used the poor plane like a rented piece of heavy equipment.

  7. #7

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    I don't know what the material of exhausts is, but they are subjected to massive, repeated, temperature cycling and they tend to get rusted surfaces. Lots of corrosive action in 1200+F exhaust. Which is why exhaust repairs are usually not worth the cost...get a full overhaul or buy new. Which is what you usually get when you have your system overhauled, they just save a flange so they can say they were 'repairing' yours, and build a new system.
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  8. #8

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    Looks like my photos didn't attach right so trying to repost.

    Exhausts have a rough life, biggest culprit is the moisture produced during combustion, combined with all the corrosive gases and constant vibration. Also there are many grades of stainless steel, the "stainless" steel used for exhaust is usually the cheapest grade of stainless available.

    And of course they are made as thin as possible to save weight while having a reasonable service life. AD is every 100 hours for exhaust inspection on the J3 I believe.

    IMG_3722.jpgIMG_3723.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    But how does that even happen, aren't those exhausts stainless steel? Alaska is a dry climate where is the water even coming from?

    Are these planes coming up from the lower 48? Water in the gas?
    I'm no engineer but I know when gas in burn in a engine one of the byproduct is H2O also call water.

  10. #10

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    My engine has about 350 hrs on it and my exhausts look nothing like that. Are these like 2,000 plus hour motors/exhausts?

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I'm no engineer but I know when gas in burn in a engine one of the byproduct is H2O also call water.

  11. #11

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    I'd have to go back through the log books to see how old they were, checked the AD says inspections should begin at 1000 hrs in service and then every 50 hrs thereafter.

    Wouldn't expect 350 to be an issue but it is amazing how quickly a shiny new exhaust changes to that dull exhaust color. Hangar (and a closed cowl) would help the outside appearance I'm sure, but the inside will always look worse.

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    How about this? I definitely had an exhaust leak in the cockpit with this....IMG_6271.jpg

    First "smoke in the cabin" landing Ive had.

  13. #13
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    A lot of times the leaks around the gaskets occur because the pipe flanges are bent via incorrect torquing. They start out a wee bit out of whack and eventually the hot gases start to cut their way through.
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  14. #14

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    Definitly dont want to cheap out on a good torque wrench, I made sure I carefully torqued mine back on. When I took mine off the insides did not look that bad either. Yes water is part of combustion but the gas is so hot the combustion should not be causing that kind of corrosion.

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    A lot of times the leaks around the gaskets occur because the pipe flanges are bent via incorrect torquing. They start out a wee bit out of whack and eventually the hot gases start to cut their way through.

  15. #15

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    +1 on torque wrenches and correct torquing sequence.

    Exhaust, like saltwater, corrodes everything eventually, how many mufflers have you seen lying along the highway or draggin by there hangers under cars? It happens, just a matter of how long it takes.

  16. #16

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    I think Float Pilot mentioned it in one of his "Stupid things that can kill you" threads. Good idea to grab the exhaust and give it a tug to make sure nothing is loose during you preflight.

  17. #17

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    My torque wrench is one of my 2 snap on tools. Snap on is generally over rated but they do have nice torque wrenches and those screw drivers with the changeable heads.

    Quote Originally Posted by BQuad View Post
    +1 on torque wrenches and correct torquing sequence.

    Exhaust, like saltwater, corrodes everything eventually, how many mufflers have you seen lying along the highway or draggin by there hangers under cars? It happens, just a matter of how long it takes.

  18. #18

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    I have CDI torque wrenches, believe they make Snap-on's, think they were a little bit cheaper, but not much. Only complaint is the 1/4" torque wrench is huge, wish they made a smaller version.

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