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Thread: Looking to purchase land in Alaska for recreation.

  1. #1

    Default Looking to purchase land in Alaska for recreation.

    Hi everyone my name is Robert. I am from Indiana. My wife and I are looking to purchase a small amount of land in Alaska for recreation, vacation time, etc. We are looking for property that would be a little remote. I am wanting to have a dedicated road to it all the way or nearly most. We aren't looking for land with a building on it. I would love to be able to hunt near the land, and understand a little travel would be required. We would be using this for a small amount of time out of the year until I retire of course.

    We have been looking on the Kenai Peninsula, and I have noticed there is a lot of affordable land ranging from 1 acre up to 35. I'm wondering if there are any areas to avoid, and maybe any areas anyone would be recommended? I am open to any suggestions, and advice. I'm not in any rush to purchase, but its something we are really wanting to do before land prices sky rocket.


    Thank you, Robert

  2. #2
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geigr01 View Post
    Hi everyone my name is Robert. I am from Indiana. My wife and I are looking to purchase a small amount of land in Alaska for recreation, vacation time, etc. We are looking for property that would be a little remote. I am wanting to have a dedicated road to it all the way or nearly most. We aren't looking for land with a building on it. I would love to be able to hunt near the land, and understand a little travel would be required. We would be using this for a small amount of time out of the year until I retire of course.

    We have been looking on the Kenai Peninsula, and I have noticed there is a lot of affordable land ranging from 1 acre up to 35. I'm wondering if there are any areas to avoid, and maybe any areas anyone would be recommended? I am open to any suggestions, and advice. I'm not in any rush to purchase, but its something we are really wanting to do before land prices sky rocket.


    Thank you, Robert
    Just for your information...... there really isn't any land that would be considered remote on the Kenai. Well, at least not by Alaskan standards. "A little remote" in AK. pretty much means no road to it. If it's got a road to it on the Kenai, you're gonna have neighbors not too far away....which is fine if you're ok with that.

    Anywhere there's a Walmart that everybody can drive to, I sure as hell wouldn't call it even a little remote. But hey, that's just me....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    More land=more taxes.

    If it were myself, I'd buy the smallest lot available.

    Odds are you won't be doing much hunting on your own land anyway... big game populations just aren't dense enough to limit yourself to 35 acres or less.
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

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  4. #4

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    My top pick......Sunrise, Alaska located in the heart of the Chugach National Forest has excellent hunting right on your own property, and nearly all properties adjoin government land. It is 78 miles from three hospitals (Anchorage, Soldotna, Seward) which becomes more important as you get older.

    There are a total of seven inhabited households, with a total population of ten humans. The tracts are large, generally 5 to 15 acres, and most have their own private shooting range (Mine is 175 yards). Waterfowl and Small Game hunting is good to excellent. Caribou, Moose, Mt. Goats, Dall Sheep, and both Black and Brown Bears inhabit this area.

    The area is accessed by the paved Hope Road, but most properties are accessed by logging type roads, which are good in the summer, but super suck in the winter. There is Zero employment, zero, zero, zero in this area. There is mail delivery, but mail boxes are generally a pleasant 1/4 mile walk from your residence. Sunrise, Alaska is an old Gold Mining town from the 1890's period.

    Everyone minds their own business and not their neighbors. You can go for weeks or months without seeing another human if you stay on your property. While Sunrise, Alaska is not remote, it is very rural. Fishing is good in this area. When you become a legal "RESIDENT" of Sunrise, Alaska you are entitled to subsistence hunting and fishing permits.

    There is electric and phone service available if a property owner wishes. Residents over 65 years old are exempt from property tax, up to the first $300,000.00 of assessed value. After 46 years of wandering around Alaska, I am happy to call Sunrise, Alaska home.

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    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    I am also looking for remote property. As mentioned above, remote up here means completely off the grid, no road access.

    The State of Alaska has over the counter land sales for remote and rural properties. Gooigle 'Alaska dnr otc' and you should find the site. It will give you a sense of what is available.

    Private land sales are plenty in most parts of the state. If the land is in an incorporated borough (Alaska version of counties) it will likely have an annual tax assessed. If you can find a small parcel in a sea of public land you can enjoy the benefits without paying loads of taxes.

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  6. #6
    Member cod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    My top pick......Sunrise, Alaska located in the heart of the Chugach National Forest has excellent hunting right on your own property, and nearly all properties adjoin government land. It is 78 miles from three hospitals (Anchorage, Soldotna, Seward) which becomes more important as you get older.

    There are a total of seven inhabited households, with a total population of ten humans. The tracts are large, generally 5 to 15 acres, and most have their own private shooting range (Mine is 175 yards). Waterfowl and Small Game hunting is good to excellent. Caribou, Moose, Mt. Goats, Dall Sheep, and both Black and Brown Bears inhabit this area.

    The area is accessed by the paved Hope Road, but most properties are accessed by logging type roads, which are good in the summer, but super suck in the winter. There is Zero employment, zero, zero, zero in this area. There is mail delivery, but mail boxes are generally a pleasant 1/4 mile walk from your residence. Sunrise, Alaska is an old Gold Mining town from the 1890's period.

    Everyone minds their own business and not their neighbors. You can go for weeks or months without seeing another human if you stay on your property. While Sunrise, Alaska is not remote, it is very rural. Fishing is good in this area. When you become a legal "RESIDENT" of Sunrise, Alaska you are entitled to subsistence hunting and fishing permits.

    There is electric and phone service available if a property owner wishes. Residents over 65 years old are exempt from property tax, up to the first $300,000.00 of assessed value. After 46 years of wandering around Alaska, I am happy to call Sunrise, Alaska home.

    Man AG, that sounds GREAT! I'm interested now. Do you know anyone who has some land there for sale??
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Member logman 49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Man AG, that sounds GREAT! I'm interested now. Do you know anyone who has some land there for sale??

    Now that's funny.....

  8. #8

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    Thanks to all who have replied so far. The biggest thing I need is to be able to access with a 4 wheel drive for at least the summer months. I don't mind not being able to hunt on my property. I would like something that I could easily travel to some public or state land to do some hunting. This would be as a non-resident ofcourse so I understand I'm slightly limited there.


    I dont don't need off the grid completely but I don't want to have to take a plane ride to get to the property everytime. Also sorry remote in my definition isn't Alaskan definition. I guess it would be more like country living. I don't need a large tract I would like to stick around 5 acres though just to have a little room in case I decide to live there year round.

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    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    AG knows where the good land is at. Get with him and he will sell you the best spot Most remote spot available in Alaska. Heck there is still gold flowing thru that creek every day. Caribou running rampant in the hills and the DC001 tag is the easiest tag to draw that the state offers. Brown bears don't even think to hibernate in that area. if you sign up for a bear bait station in Hope you are sure to have the entire area to yourself. No-one will ever think to venture that far in the the wilderness to drag dog for or popcorn to bait some of the largest black or brown bears the state has to offer. I'd bet bet that AG knows of plenty of land you could get for cheap. I'd PM him for more info.
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  10. #10
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    Robert,

    Land in Alaska probably is not likely to skyrocket any time soon. With the scaling back of the oil & gas industry there is much talk of a recession in the state economy. You may be seeing property prices going in the other direction. This means you have plenty of time to consider what features you and your wife want in your ideal lot and find a property that is a good match.

    Have a look at other threads in this forum and the Cabins and Remote Living forum. You'll likely gain some insight into things people deal with in various parts of the state, from wild fires to vandalous bears and obnoxious neighbors. This may help you decide what region to focus your search. After that you can enlist the assistance of a realtor or make use of the online resources available. Web sites to include are Alaska DNR Land Sales, Craigslist, AlaskasList, remoteproperties.com and landinalaska.com. There are many other realty web sites but the last two cater particularly to those interested in recreational properties.

    Once you've identified a property, you can generally look it up in the State's land records mapper. This tool is extremely powerful and rather overhelming at first use. But with it you can drill down to an individual lot and see it in the context of a base map of your choosing, such as a topo map or air photo/ satellite imagery. Bear in mind that sometimes a parcel gets subdivided by the landowner and this is not captured in the DNR Mapper. You can however see subdivisions by searching them by name at the Recorder's Office.

    Finally, the advice I have received from members here includes the recommendation to get on the ground that you want to purchase. No amount of internet research will match the value of walking over the property yourself. You will then know firsthand whether you can actually can get to the property in the summer, whether or not the photos and descriptions are a fair representation, and whether the neighboring land is developed and to what degree. And should you ever want to build a cabin you'll know if the property is suitable for your future needs.

  11. #11

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    Of course local "Residents" get a Federal subsistence permit yearly for DC001. So you are correct it is 100% guaranteed. The real estate expert for this area is Terry Beal with Dynamic (beal@mtaonline.net)

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob B View Post
    Caribou running rampant in the hills and the DC001 tag is the easiest tag to draw that the state offers..

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Just for your information...... there really isn't any land that would be considered remote on the Kenai. Well, at least not by Alaskan standards. "A little remote" in AK. pretty much means no road to it. If it's got a road to it on the Kenai, you're gonna have neighbors not too far away....which is fine if you're ok with that.

    Anywhere there's a Walmart that everybody can drive to, I sure as hell wouldn't call it even a little remote. But hey, that's just me....
    I have land in Grey Cliff on the edge of the Refuge that I consider remote. It's 5 miles from the end of the Spur Hwy. Has cabins. You ain't getting there in the family mini van.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    In the nearly 20 years I’ve been in Alaska, I have not seen a significant increase in the prices for what I’ll term recreational property i.e. those typically used to build weekend cabins on. I don’t see that trend changing. So take your time and thoroughly research any land you plan to buy, and that means physically visiting the land especially during break up.

    As to areas to avoid, you are advised to avoid swampy areas, flood plains and areas prone to break-ins and vandalism. Unfortunately to a large degree those last two items can be an issue with any property, especially those visited infrequently.

    Remember when looking at land, there is a big difference between affordable and useable. A large percentage of land might seem affordable, but will be useless or near useless. The difference in price between land you can drive to in the summer and land you can “almost” drive to isn’t nearly as great as the difference in use-ability of the land.

    Good luck with your search, educate yourself the attributes of good land, take your time to research it and be willing to pay what good land costs when the right lot comes on the market for you. As a general rule, any lot that has been on the market for more than a few months is either over-priced, or has issues. And no matter what a “good deal” land with issues might look like, it should be avoided at all costs.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  14. #14

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    As Paul stated put foot on the ground that you want to buy.A lot of people think just because that land is high up on the bank of a river that it will all be solid ground. The truth is that you can and will have swamps on high ground that has deeper mud than swamps at a lower level.You always want look at the land in the summer not when it is covered in snow.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Some keywords you will want to look for, and then avoid any land containing them.

    Black Spruce.
    Swamp View.
    Trailer on site.
    Bluff overlooks river.
    10 minutes from Fred Meyer/Walmart/Carrs.
    Great rental property.



    Best of luck to you....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
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    Member Mkay's Avatar
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    Back in SW Arkansas this is slightly modified:

    Scrub Pine.
    Stock pond view.
    Double-Wide on concrete blocks.
    Train goes by so often you won't notice.
    5 minutes from Piggly Wiggly.
    200 foot long chicken house operation.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

  17. #17

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    A few more........
    ______________________


    Ice worn area

    Roaring Tundra Toad area

    White socks and mosquito area

    F-16 flight departure path zone

    Private Native Corp. Land No Hunting

    Former WW-II military toxic waste disposal area

    Former Atomic Bomb test area

    AlaskaHippie Area




    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    Some keywords you will want to look for, and then avoid any land containing them.

    Black Spruce.
    Swamp View.
    Trailer on site.
    Bluff overlooks river.
    10 minutes from Fred Meyer/Walmart/Carrs.
    Great rental property.



    Best of luck to you....

  18. #18
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Well, that last one covers a purty wide swath....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I have land in Grey Cliff on the edge of the Refuge that I consider remote. It's 5 miles from the end of the Spur Hwy. Has cabins. You ain't getting there in the family mini van.
    Yes, but can you drive your 4x4 highway vehicle to it like he is asking, or do you have to get to it via your atv?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Yes, but can you drive your 4x4 highway vehicle to it like he is asking, or do you have to get to it via your atv?
    In the winter, I can drive right up to the door by traveling down the pipeline in my pickup. I hauled firewood from there all winter last year. In the summer, I can drive my pickup down the beach and hike in a short distance, or park at Captain Cook and ride the atv all the way to the cabin. The one we have for sale is right next to Leif Creek and Jacobs Ladder. I have a cabin about a half mile from the beach on the crest of a hill just off the pipeline that I currently use. My son has one next door. Both on 5 acre parcels. I also own 5 acres on the bluff with a 750 sq ft. cabin that is waiting to be finished inside. I plan to sell the one near the pipeline when the bluff cabin is done.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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