Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Taking a freighter up skinny water

  1. #1
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    683

    Default Taking a freighter up skinny water

    I'm casting my eyes over some property for sale off the road system, and see a lot of parcels that are on or near some very small streams. Looking at Google Earth imagery some of these creeks get less than 10' in width at times. I've yet to put a motor on a canoe and go upstream, so I have no sense of what the practical limitations are on taking a freighter canoe up skinny water. Does anyone have some experiences they can share on what to look for in a stream to ensure it's navigable? Or a trhead they can point me to?

    Thanks heaps!

  2. #2
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    I know plenty of real small streams that you could do that on. The main thing would be how much deadfall you'd have to clear. That could get pretty ridiculous fairly quick....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  3. #3
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    683

    Default

    I'm going to be checking out properties this winter, but if I can find something that is also accessible by a shallow draft vessel then it's that much more appealing to me. Some time invested in clearing deadfall would be worth it, within reason of course.

    I've got some example pics of Eightmile Creek. Deadfall and water level are obvious factors, but the stream width and the radius of curvature on the bends are a concern for me.



    No real concern on the lower reaches


    Things start to get tight...

    And the final reach...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    683

    Default



    Anyone have opinions on getting up this stretch? Any limitations on canoe or motor?

    I tried to get all three images from the same camera altitude, so scale should be pretty much the same. Minimum stream width I measured was 14 feet.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    canoe up a small stream ?? the boat has to float , if it don't float you got to drag it , next motor will push it up if you got some water under it,
    how big is the stream on the average ? is it inches? FT? or YARDS?
    as long as the canoe floats you can drag it a long way, but if it is dragged
    2 things come up #1 the bottom how long will it hold up ? #2 how long will you hold up . you can motor up if you got water . you go from pot hole to hole,
    the shallow's between the holes you dragged, a motor with a lift can do a lot ,
    the long tales motors you will have some trouble with small streams I think;
    I don't know if that helps but my 2 CTS SID PS your stream looks good to travel from what I could see from the photos
    GOOD LUCK

  6. #6
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    683

    Default

    Thanks Sid, I have no clue what the water levels are like in some of these streams but I think I'll bull my way forward nonetheless. Appreciate your advice. You make a good point about the canoe bottom too. I don't have a freighter yet, but will make sure to get one that can handle the conditions.

  7. #7
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    I have spent some time on Eightmile. Not a creek that you will get very far up even a canoe.

  8. #8
    Member akriverunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    506

    Default

    Yeah I think eightmile is pretty skinny. Have fished the mouth in the past. Are you wanting to boat there then take a canoe to the property, or fly and canoe to the property? I'm guessing the only access in summer would be by airplane if there's a strip nearby if the creek isn't navigable. Try to think about travel time getting to and from the cabin also, it eats up valuable time when you are only going there for a few days or week at a time.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chugiak, Alaska
    Posts
    683

    Default

    I'm looking for a property that will be a fly-in location with practical snowmachine access in the winter. I wouldn't mind if I could also have water access in the summer. I don't have a freighter, and my Mad River has never seen a motor, so I have no measure of what is too skinny. I was just trying to get a sense for what's reasonable to think I could get up in a canoe with a surface drive or jackass lift. I've seen where folks got jet boats into Donkey Creek Lake, so i figure i can use that as a measuring stick.



    Streamflow permitting, Eightmile Creek doesn't look any worse.

  10. #10

    Default

    Skinny creeks are such a challenge..lol

    I've been hunting one for 5 years, and here's what I've learned. Every Fall will be quite different. Some years there will be lots of water at the beginning of hunting season, some there will be little.. there will almost ALWAYS be more water at the beginning of the season than there is at the end...typically always more going up, than coming down.. you can typically power up sections early you'll need to drag later when laden with a moose/meat..

    I stayed late this season(you know, till the time the hunting gets really good).. boy did I suffer coming out.. like 15 miles of really challenging dragging.. and 35 miles of shallow, dodging rocks..

    Skinny rivers, and Alaska converge against you..lol Plan on lower water coming out though.. pretty standard through Alaska.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    starting about the first of Sept every year out in the boon docks you can see the water level on most streams go down every night , that is up in the Tyone Lake / Big Sue , part of the state down on the KP it can be real wet loke wise up by Fairbanks the water drops after the 1 Sept every year in most cases , then it also what do you call skinny water ? an what you call a small stream , what I call small might not be what you call small ?
    if you look at the little Willow Stream, I call it a fair size river "" not small ""
    SID

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    starting about the first of Sept every year out in the boon docks you can see the water level on most streams go down every night , that is up in the Tyone Lake / Big Sue , part of the state down on the KP it can be real wet loke wise up by Fairbanks the water drops after the 1 Sept every year in most cases , then it also what do you call skinny water ? an what you call a small stream , what I call small might not be what you call small ?
    if you look at the little Willow Stream, I call it a fair size river "" not small ""
    SID
    Yea, that's true about the KP.. water could easily rise towards the end of the season. Almost all northern rivers will be dropping, and dropping fast. The difference between ending your hunt the 10th or the 20th can be the difference between an easy paddle out to a brutal float drag..lol

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •