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Thread: Hunter Shot on Montague

  1. #1
    Member Stanly's Avatar
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    Default Hunter Shot on Montague

    http://www.ktva.com/hunter-found-sho...anchorage-371/

    Does anyone know anything about this?
    When the HOGS show up, somethins gonna DIE!!!
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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    What the...??? If he was shot on Montague, how in the heck did he get to "near Seward"...???

    Oh and.... how come it took nearly 2.5 hours for the coast guard to get there from Kodiak?

    Yeah......it's weird we haven't heard more about seeing that it happened on the 18th. I'd like to know more about the story too.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    What the...??? If he was shot on Montague, how in the heck did he get to "near Seward"...???.
    Safe to assume it didn't involve a copy editor.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
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  4. #4

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    Looks like theeeee place to go if you want to get a bullet hole in you. This from last year.........http://www.adn.com/article/20140630/...-alaska-island

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    If he was on the SW end of Montague, he was closer to Seward than any other town except the village of Chenega.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

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    He may have been staying in the San Juan Forest Service Cabin.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post

    Oh and.... how come it took nearly 2.5 hours for the coast guard to get there from Kodiak?
    Montague is 205 miles from Kodiak, the MH-60 has a normal cruising speed of 150kts. Factor in scramble time, weather avoidance, detection and on-scene assessment; 2hr 20min response time is pretty good...

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    Odd there has been no follow up on this story. This happened a week ago and only one short blurb about it? How did he end up shot? self inflicted or somebody else?
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  9. #9
    Member Stanly's Avatar
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    So it looks like the Coast Guard turned it over to the Troopers. You would think there would be something on this, but maybe not...
    When the HOGS show up, somethins gonna DIE!!!
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  10. #10
    Member Tyin 1 On's Avatar
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    Well I believe it time to make it a law that orange is required to be worn while deer hunting on Montague

  11. #11

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    Outside of knowing the details of the incident, orange isnt a bad idea. There are plenty of those types out there hunting who will simply shoot at movement not even knowing what the heck they are shooting at.

  12. #12
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwfishak View Post
    There are plenty of those types out there hunting who will simply shoot at movement not even knowing what the heck they are shooting at.
    Sad but true. That and worse. I know of a guy who was shot while sitting on a rock outcrop, glassing. Idiot who shot him said he "thought he looked like a bear".
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  13. #13
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    Idiot who shot him said he "thought he looked like a bear".
    That's freakin scary right there. Remember what we were taught during Hunter Safety, don't shoot if you can't 100 percent identify what you're shooting at? I remember reading something about a guy getting shot sitting in a tree stand. How the heck can someone sitting in a tree stand look like anything other that what it is. Here's a link to Alaska Hunter Safety, maybe take a look for a little refresher so this doesn't happen again...

    https://www.hunter-ed.com/alaska/?ut...rs%20%2Bsafety
    When the HOGS show up, somethins gonna DIE!!!
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    32' Custom Wooldridge
    MMSI #: 338181573

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    My Wife and I are going to Prince of Wales next fall for deer and bear. I don't care what the law is, we are going to be wearing at least some blaze orange for safety. Where I live, it is required and I have no problem being successful on my hunts here. It is just that on public land, you never know who you are going to run into out there.

  15. #15
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    I was the hunter shot on Nov 18th.
    Here are the facts:
    Location: North side of Port Chalmers, Montague Island
    Caliber: 30.06 180gr Rem CoreLokt
    Time: 1140
    Distance: Approx 70 yards
    Weather: 25F, sunny, light winds
    Terrain: Steep heavily timbered hillside, moderate underbrush. Ankle deep, crunchy snow.
    Hunter Orange: None

    The story:
    This was day 4 of a 4 day hunt with a well known transporter. We had seen few deer and shot one--a button buck. For the last day we had decided to separate more (and BS less) and move slower. We were already 150 yards apart in open country as we approached the south face of a large, somewhat elongated and flat-topped hill covered in mature timber. I moved west another 400 yards to an open saddle while my partner continued north to the base of the hill. After a bit of glassing I turned northeast and worked my way up to and along the crest on the north side. I reached the approximate center of the hill top and turned south and made my way to the opposite crest. The timber was heavy enough that there was little to no snow on the hill top. Just frozen sphagnum moss covering everything.

    After stopping for a few minutes to listen and glass I descended about 10 yards. I was struck by how pretty it was with the gold sunlight filtering through the trees. I stopped to take a few pictures. I was interrupted by the sound of movement off to my right (west) at my level and quickly slipped my phone in my pocket and brought my binos up trying to make out some part of a deer. I looked and looked. Nothing, so I moved downhill a bit more to get a better angle. Still nothing.

    Then I heard movement again to my right but well downhill. Again I scanned with my bino's and found the face of my partner through a lane in the brush about 60 yards west of me and another 30 yards down slope. I relaxed and thought I'd make my way down to him and we'd have lunch but first I tried getting his attention. I waved at him. Then I pulled my hat off so he could see my full face and waved some more. I stopped to adjust my rifle sling on my left shoulder and looked away. I did not yell out because I didn't want to spook any deer that might be playing cat and mouse with us on this hill.

    As I turned and waved at him again it happened.

    What I'm about to describe happened in a tenth of a second or so but it seemed like slow motion--this effect is known as Temporal Distortion and it happens because your brain works much faster than your consciousness.

    Anyway...I saw the muzzle flash--more smoke than flame, then I saw the rippling distortion behind the bullet followed by the "fwizzzz" of the bullet passing an inch over my left thumb. The bullet hit with sharp, heavy smack, and finally I heard the boom. I was essentially looking down the barrel when the trigger was pulled and saw it all because I was relaxed and not anticipating it.

    I cried out "Oh ***k, ______ you just shot me!" in a voice that was half yell, half shriek.

    Without hesitation my partner yelled back "No I didn't! I just shot a deer!"

    I responded "NO YOU DIDN'T!! YOU SHOT ME!!"

    "Oh my God. Oh my God. I'm so sorry. DON'T MOVE I'LL BE RIGHT THERE"

    I was hit in the left shoulder and the bullet blew a large hole in my posterior deltoid muscle. After the initial shock to us both he grabbed his pack and scrambled up to me and as luck would have it, he carries a GSW dressing in his med kit "because you never know". The wound was dressed and under control within 5 or 6 minutes, but for those first two or three minutes, before it could be assessed, I thought I might be bleeding to death. Once I was assured I was going to live I had to then get myself to help since it was obvious I needed medical attention. We had a marine VHF radio in a "what if" duffle back on the beach. I asked my partner to carry my pack and rifle and I took off for the beach with my hand tucked in my shirt as an impromptu sling. The walk out was about a mile. I had no issues or falls on the walk out. I said some prayers of thanks and asked God to look out for my dear friend who would undoubtedly need help getting over this.

    Here's the timeline:
    1140: The shot
    1146: wound dressed
    1150: begin return to drop off/pick up point on beach
    1210: reach drop off/pick up point (I got there about 20 mins ahead of partner)
    1215: hail transporter on VHF 16 and tell him I've been shot
    1215: transporter hails USCG Anchorage center with notice
    1240: transporter picks us up in landing craft/skiff
    1305: RTB main vessel
    1331: USCG HH-60 Jayhawk launches from Kodiak
    1532: HH-60 lands on small unnamed island in Port Chalmers
    1540: HH-60 departs with me bound for Anchorage
    1635: HH-60 lands at AK Regional

    I was x-rayed, cleaned up, patched up and sent home with a handful of pain killers. No surgery, no stitches, but the ER doc did make a point to tell me that I came within an inch of dying. An inch higher and the bullet would've missed but an inch in any other direction and I bleed to death. Period, no maybe's. I either have my left arm blown off at the AC joint or I'm struck in the subclavian artery and top of left lung.

    As it turns out I was incredibly lucky. Other than nicking the Acromion Process portion of my shoulder blade, the wound was all skin and muscle. There was no structural damage done to my shoulder and I'm within a few days of sloughing off the last bit of scab. I've already been splitting wood and even went snowmachining twice already. I have since been in the care of an orthopedic and a plastic surgeon since there was a discussion initially of me possibility of needing a skin graft. I will regain full use of my shoulder.

    The news media got it all wrong, partly because the Coast Guard got it wrong. There was no Good Samaritan boater. The Coastie working the control/dispatch that afternoon was, judging from the tone of her voice, young and likely new to the Coast Guard and to Alaska--she didn't know where Montague was and she repeated several questions on her checklist but that's OK. We were all newbies at one time. I was picked up by the transporter who dropped me off that morning. That it was a commercial operation was lost in translation.

    We made several errors that I want to lay out:
    1) We failed to discuss a plan--my partner had no idea I was in front of him
    2) I failed to wear something bright
    3) He forgot his binoculars that morning
    4) We both felt extra pressure to kill deer since it was the last day
    5) Ultimately, he failed to verify his target

    The power of the mind to see what it wants instead of what's there is a critical component of this mishap. This was not a case of blasting into the brush or snap shooting at movement. My partner looked at me for 30 seconds through a rifle scope before carefully squeezing off his shot. Between the mottled light, the brush, and the fact that I was wearing subdued clothes, including cattail camo pants he saw a deer where a man stood.

    My waving outstretched hands? Antlers
    My fully exposed pale face? a deer's butt

    When he pulled the trigger he was looking at my left shoulder thinking it was the right shoulder of a buck quartering away. I was in the shade of a tree with the outer edge of my left arm and shoulder bathed in that golden light. Everything was black, darkish green or golden. Him being anxious and winded helped complete the illusion. He first looked at me at 5 power but his heart was racing and the crosshairs bouncing so he dialed down to 3 power for more field of view and even adjusted his trek pole/monopod shooting stick for a solid rest.

    Some will call him an idiot and pass all sorts of holier-than-thou judgements and I have to say I debated whether or not to share this because this forum is chock full of sanctimonious know-it-all's, because that's the nature of the internet. You may judge but I won't. My friend is still my friend and will remain so because he is one of the best, most conscientious and honorable men I have ever met who happened to make a terrible mistake. And yes, it could have turned out far, far worse. But it didn't. As such, I called him and got his OK to post this because friends don't sandbag their friends.

    The bottom line here, the one thing I want you to take away from this is if it could happen to him, it could happen to anyone.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  16. #16

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    Thank you for sharing your story Erik....

    I am glad you and your friend are ok, considering the circumstances!!!

  17. #17
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    Thanks for sharing! Glad to hear you were "lucky".

    I hope to God I'm never on either end of such a situation. A good reminder. Thanks.

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    Great update and even greater you are still with us.
    NRA Life Member since 1974

  19. #19
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    Thank you for sharing the experience. It may well save someone's life on day.

    I cringed in reading your story. When I was 14 a friend of my fathers accidentally shot me with a .270 in my right ankle. I was running at about 100 yards (away from them). It felt like someone hit my ankle with a 10 pound sledge hammer and then the ache and burn for the 3 hour trip to the hospital.

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    Thanks for the real story. Although you got shot, I'm betting the shooter felt/feels worse than you in many ways!

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