Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Strange Smell from Salmon

  1. #1

    Default Strange Smell from Salmon

    I recently started catching, storing, and eating salmon. I notice that after being vacuum packed, the salmon has a somewhat strange smell that quickly dissapates. Not a fishy smell, but almost a chemical smell. The most probable causes I can think of are :

    (1) - Fish slime (is there a way to remove it during the cleaning/filleting?);

    (2) - Just the natural, unavoidable consequence of being vacuum packed;

    (3) - SOmeone told me that the black garbage bags I've been storing my caught fish in have chemicals that leach into the fish and that I should be using white bags instead.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I vacuum seal quite a bit of salmon and halibut and have never noticed any odd odors. I can tell you that I don't use trash bags to store my fish at any time.... I'd be more worried about the heat. Before I seal them, I wrap em up in either plastic wrap or freezer paper. Then vac seal.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    607

    Default

    I'm with Soggy Mountain.......the only time I put a fish in a plastic garbage bag is when I am putting it on ice and want to keep it from getting waterlogged - and them I use clear or white ones. I have seen fish go bad in a very short time in a black plastic bag - when it was not iced.

    When you vacuum seal do you put the fish right into the freezer or is there a delay of a couple of hours??

  4. #4

    Default

    I've been putting the fillets in black garbage bag, transporting from the creek to my house (5--10 min), vacuum seal, and then immediately freeze. Should I wrap before I seal? Freeze before I seal? I haven't had any problems with taste or even smell after cooking, just smell right out of the vacuum bag.

  5. #5
    Member Joel Zadvorney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Buffalo New York
    Posts
    49

    Default

    It's the bags giving off the chem smell. Get some of those mega sized ziplock bags. You can wash them out and reuse them a bunch of times. Many uses.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    80

    Default Off Odor

    I can't identify the cause but everyone's suggestion to avoid garbage bags is a good one. Most all trash bags are chemically treated to control garbage smells. There usta' be a bag made by 'Presto' that was safe for food storage. I'd use these for my moose meat while still in the field. Other'n that your process seems sound; store on ice, vacuum seal, and freeze ASAP.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    23

    Default

    I don't use garbage bags either.

    Bleed the fish immediately, gut it and put it on ice with ice in the gut cavity for quick cooling ASAP. I then cut it up as soon as I get home and freeze in chunks in zip lock bags for 1-2 days; then take it out of those and spray it with a mist of water which freezes with a glaze of ice to protect it due to the fish being frozed; then vacume pack it. I have had kings stay good for up to a year with this method.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    607

    Default

    Wow! thats a really professional method of packing. Does that help with the problem of bones sometimes poking through the bags and allowing air in to freezer burn the meat?

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    690

    Default Try This

    Try This;

    Switch to the white bags and mark the vacuum sealed bags. If you don't notice a change then do what I do:

    1. All fish that gets vacuum sealed gets skinned first.
    2. All fish that has skin on it gets smoked.

    Storing with skin on can give the fish an unpleasant taste/odor; but distinguishing tastes won't really notice the smoked stuff being a little fishy.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    176

    Default

    I can, smoke, or eat fresh so cant comment on the vacuum packing but Im against the black garbage bags for similar reasons. Personally, for best field care I ALWAYS take one or two burlap gunny sacks and use them as coolers after fish are bled and gutted. Dunk them in the creek, get em soaked, drain a little and either bag or wrap your fish in them. They cool as the evaporate. Then put your gunny in the plastic bag for the ride home. Works every time.

  11. #11

    Default

    Thanks for all the great tips! I think it's probably the garbage bag; the smell has kind of a garbage bag odor to it. Like I said, after cooking, I don't notice anything, so the meat's still good. But the smell out of the vacuum bag is a bit offputting.

    Now if I can just figure out how to get those pinbones out...

  12. #12
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default

    Revisit the salmon filleting forum that FishnPhysician posted. I have not had the opportunity to try his technique (YET) but, it is on my list of things I must.

    I use those mega zipper bags too Joel. They're tough and totally washable.

  13. #13
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    If you're just trasferring from the river to your house after filleting, I'd forgo any of the bags. Get a 50# commercial sausage tote is something like $15. Great way to tranfer fillets, also great for dry brining for smoking.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •