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Thread: Interesting article about seal/otter hunting.

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    Default Interesting article about seal/otter hunting.

    Today's Sunday paper. Very interesting read. I have a rifle that a seal hunter from Prince William Sound used. It's a Remington in .222 and has a Weaver scope. Hand made sling with cool knots. Pretty rusty but still shoots, although about half of the bullets key hole at 100 yards.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    although about half of the bullets key hole at 100 yards.
    That's ok, it just makes em' bigger when they do that...!!!........lol

    What paper?
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post

    What paper?
    Here's a direct link to the article:

    http://www.adn.com/article/20151121/...hoot-sea-otter

    Thanks for posting that, SmokeRoss. I enjoyed reading the story. I sure would like to see more of a sustainable industry come out of the sea otter and seal hunts - interesting inside perspective on one man's work at making that a reality. I have a seal/sea otter hat on order, but a few hats isn't going to support hunters/craftsmen doing this full time.

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    I had a Native man put walrus ivory grips on an old Colt revolver years ago. He did a great job and the price was more than fair. Wish I could locate him again. I'd send him some more work.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Pretty sure that article originally appeared over a year ago. Note reference to January., which it's not...yet.
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    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Cool.

    Its never easy to have the "Hunt it" to "made it and sold" and all that has to happen inbetween. So many skills, from sharp shooting to smart busness, and all the tanning, sewing, crafting and place to happen aside from the hunting and its gear.......I did read it when it first came out, and it was worth reading again.
    Thanx!
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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Nice guy. He had a table the Native Arts Market at the Anchorage Dimond Center last year. Makes some very nice stuff.

    http://www.furrondy.net/events/the-c...ve-arts-market

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    MMPA prevents much of any economic activity with marine mammal products. I think there is wording in it preventing "substantial commercial" activity. So I think that becoming noticeably successful with a sea otter clothing business could cause problems.
    Long but interesting article.
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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    As a hunter, and marine mammal tagger for the USFWS, the item has to be "significantly altered" vs a raw or just tanned hide. Then the intent of the language is to keep business small and not a large commercial operation (all in the name of keeping the population from being hunted to extinction). It gets fuzzy quick in the language of the law.

    Sobie2

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    As someone who has hunted and harvested sea otters for a dozen years I very much enjoyed the article. However, I must say my experience with eating these critter is far different. I took the loins from my first kill and grilled them in a similar fashion. It tasted like a mixture of clams, salmon and oysters that had been left in a bag for a week in the Phoenix summer sun.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    However, I must say my experience with eating these critter is far different. I took the loins from my first kill and grilled them in a similar fashion. It tasted like a mixture of clams, salmon and oysters that had been left in a bag for a week in the Phoenix summer sun.
    I was wondering about that. Some folks rave about akutaq, but it certainly doesn't agree with my palate. I assumed the same was true of other regional delicacies such as sea otters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
    However, I must say my experience with eating these critter is far different... It tasted like a mixture of clams, salmon and oysters that had been left in a bag for a week in the Phoenix summer sun.
    +2 Reputation points!

    Sobie2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I was wondering about that. Some folks rave about akutaq, but it certainly doesn't agree with my palate. I assumed the same was true of other regional delicacies such as sea otters.
    My dad has made comments about eating raccoon when he was a kid. They ate pretty much everything, including Piliated Wood Peckers. Those were tasty according to him. Raccoon was greasy and he never asked to have it served again as an adult even though us boys occasionally got one.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sobie2 View Post
    Then the intent of the language is to keep business small and not a large commercial operation (all in the name of keeping the population from being hunted to extinction). Sobie2
    The reason hunting to extinction is a risk is because MMPA doesn't do any "managing". Just restricts harvest to certain race and for certain reasons. No bag limits.
    I would think the sea otter population in Alaska could be managed and business in otter products could be a contribution to Alaska economics.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
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