Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Inflatable raft instead of a sleeping pad???

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage,AK/ Omaha,NE
    Posts
    177

    Default Inflatable raft instead of a sleeping pad???

    I was just going through all my gear for the fall and was wondering about replacing my sleeping pad with one of those inflatable rafts for swimming.It can be folded up into next too nothing and doesnt weigh but 1/2 pound or so.It also wouldnt take up nearly as much room and bulk as a rolled up sleeping pad.Anyone else think of this or actually do it? The only problem I would see is the air getting colder since there is more of it.But if you have a good bag things should be OK right?

    Feel free to chime in-Tim

  2. #2
    Member mod elan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Glennallen
    Posts
    1,476

    Default

    A lot easier to pop, then you have nothing. There are some good, light pads out there. Just depends on the budget.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    Air mattresses in general get pretty cold unless they have some foam in them like a self inflating pad. A "good" sleeping bag doesn't always help as much as you might think. Sometimes the cheaper ones have less compressible fill. Goose Down doesn't work well on an air mattress, and neither does some of the high loft fibers.

    I often sleep in my inflatable kayak though. I pull the seat out, let out half the air, and add in a thin foam pad. Nicest bed in camp, but it's the thin pad that makes it work for me.

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,417

    Default

    If you like the blow up kind the Big Agnes Insulated Air-Core is a good one. I have one and it has the 2.5 inch tubes. Those 2.5 inch air tubes make rocks disapear. It's worth 18-21ozs to me.

    http://www.bigagnes.com/str_pads.php?id=ia

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage,AK/ Omaha,NE
    Posts
    177

    Default

    I have 2 different pads now,a full size insulated one for colder temps,and the 3/4 length one for warmer times.Just wondering if anyone else out there thought the same as I did.Just kinda makes sense too me,smaller,lighter,more compact.Maybe I will try it out in the yard before heading up the mountain with it.

    Tim

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,417

    Default multi-purpose gear...

    and if your tent leaks and fills up you'll just float instead of get soaked... HAHA

  7. #7
    Member trapperrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Seward, AK
    Posts
    201

    Default Thermarest

    I've got a couple of Thermarest pads; I think they are the 1.5" or 2". The only down side is that they are only about 22" wide. I like sleeping on my side so something is always hanging off. Other than that they are great; the air squishes out and they don't take up a whole lot of room. They definately keep most of the ground cold out.

  8. #8
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    The BEGINNING of the road!
    Posts
    1,137

    Thumbs down It's a NO-GO for me!

    Quote Originally Posted by tjkanavel View Post
    I was just going through all my gear for the fall and was wondering about replacing my sleeping pad with one of those inflatable rafts for swimming.It can be folded up into next too nothing and doesnt weigh but 1/2 pound or so.It also wouldnt take up nearly as much room and bulk as a rolled up sleeping pad.Anyone else think of this or actually do it? The only problem I would see is the air getting colder since there is more of it.But if you have a good bag things should be OK right?

    Feel free to chime in-Tim
    You've got good intentions Tim, but I'm afraid you will be disappointed. Some good posts already, but I thought I'd let you know that I only use my "air only" mattresses indoors anymore.

    Maybe there are bags out there that work with them, but the physics tells the story if you ask me. Think about how "good" sleeping bags are constructed...the top side, which is exposed to the air, has more fill/loft than the underside. I suppose you could turn the bag over We were just out this past weekend for a one nighter and my dad carried an air mat for all the same reasons you mentioned. I slept on some evergreen boughs laid on the ground. He got cold, I didn't. He usually places a foam pad on top of the mattress and that works good, but now you are back to the bulk.

    my .02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •