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Thread: Help a newbie?

  1. #1
    Member Boreal's Avatar
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    Default Help a newbie?

    Hi all,
    I've resisted adding yet another expensive hobby to my list, but with my 10 year old daughter having so much fun with her bow, I decided to "bite the bullet" and pick up a bow of my own. Got a great deal on a Diamond Carbon Cure, with the standard hunting package: Truglo Apex sight, Hostage rest, etc. I also got a six pack of carbon arrows (0.003"), with 4" vanes. After an initial sight in at 20 yards, I've now been getting three arrows touching at 20 yards, and have shot off a vane from 2 arrows. Needless to say, I'm having a blast.

    The questions I have: If I'm knocking off vanes, I'm going to need some way to replace them. If I'm going to buy a jig, should I get a jig for 2" or 4" vanes? What are your thoughts as to benefits of each type for hunting in AK?

    Is a drop away rest better than the Hostage containment rest for the shorter, but taller 2" vanes? Any thoughts of limb driven vs cable driven?

    Have any of you figured out how to enjoy this fantastic sport without spending all of your PFDs?

    Thanks,
    Steve

  2. #2
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    We've got several very good, helpful archery shops in Eagle River and Wasilla. Great places to start. And start shooting each arrow into a different bull on the target

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    If it is the R.A.K Hostage rest, I would throw it away and get a whisker biscuit or whatever else you like. The R.A.K rest is very flimsy and will eventually fail, probably at the worst possible moment. If it is the Octane Hostage, they are much better built.

    I'm a fan of the Bitzenberger jig but there are plenty out there that will do the job.

    The difference in rests is tradeoffs of what you are willing to accept. A drop away is probably more accurate but, it has moving parts and thus more likely to fail. A Hostage/Whisker biscuit is solid, no moving parts but you may trade a little accuracy.

    Certain bow/cam systems work better with certain drop away rest. For binary/slave cams, I would recommend a limb driven model as a cable driven model will often throw off the timing.

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    Welcome to Archery Steve! In my opinion, anything is better than a Hostage. The Whisker Biscuit rest is really affordable and almost fail proof. Fall away rests are efficient and what I see most people shooting, they start at about $60. About half shooting cable and the other half limb driven.
    Bitzeberger jigs are definitely the way to go and allow you to do any size fletching.
    Come see us at the range if you get a chance, 5801 Blue Lupine drive. We'd be happy to answer any questions. Kids 3-D league is on Tuesdays!
    I don't think I've saved a PFD yet!

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    We've got several very good, helpful archery shops in Eagle River and Wasilla.
    There's no shop in Eagle River, unfortunately. That is...unless there's a new one I'm not aware of. Our most recent shop was The Archer's Den which closed down years ago.

    I've been out to Screaming Eagle once thus far and was really pleased with their service.

    As for replacing fletchings, I've been shooting FOBs instead, which makes such an issue a non-issue.

  6. #6
    Member Boreal's Avatar
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    Hey, thanks for the help Gents! The rest is an Octane Hostage, but when I bought the bow it was pointed out as likely the first thing I would want to replace. I was looking at the Limbdriver Pro V, limb-driven rest. I imagine a limb driven rest could be limped along on a hunt if something went wrong, where a cable driven rest would be done. Is that true?

    Fobs, interesting. Hadn't seen those before. Those would require a drop away rest, it seems.

    The more I dig, the more I realize how much there is to learn. Thanks again for all the help, I'm sure I'll be back with more questions, and hopefully a few good pics next fall!

  7. #7
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    From the beginning, I started using local pro shops over any of the box stories, not that the later "can't" do the job, it's just that the local pro shops are geared to give you "personal" service to your needs. Jerry and Barb Fletcher at Fletcher's Archery (closed for quite a while now), set me up very well and I would encourage you to use someone similar. That said, I have had excellent personal care at Screaming Eagle. I hear great things about Full Curl in Los Anchorage as well. There are a number of other places too, I just haven't had any personal experience with them.

    I really like my drop away arrow rest. I have a QAP, but most of my hunting partners use a whisker bisket and love them. To me, keep it simple is the rule. The less moving parts the better.

    As to vanes, I have gone exclusive to the short Blazer or Fusion veins and don't shoot the 4 inch any more with my compound. Longbow or recurve I would probably stick with the 4 inch. I also to the helical twist in the veins. I'm 100% in love with the result.

    LIke any other hobby, the more you spend, the more you want to spend :-) It's easy to spend a $100 on a bow then accessorize it with a $1000 of gear :-) We have all been there. The key is, get to know your current set up and don't change or upgrade in the first year unless there is a major problem. You have an excellent start. Now, try to set up a small area at your home (10 to 20 yds will do) and pledge that you will shoot six arrows a day regardless of weather and you will be a pro in a year's time :-) Enjoy and have fun.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger45 View Post
    From the beginning, I started using local pro shops over any of the box stories, not that the later "can't" do the job, it's just that the local pro shops are geared to give you "personal" service to your needs. Jerry and Barb Fletcher at Fletcher's Archery (closed for quite a while now), set me up very well and I would encourage you to use someone similar. That said, I have had excellent personal care at Screaming Eagle.
    Thanks Roger!!

  9. #9

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    Roger 45 and the other guys are all correct in their advise. I would mention an additional item, shooting the veins off the arrows sound cool as does driving one arrow through the back of another. Think a couple of thoughts: the cost of an arrow vs bragging rights, and when you clip veins off you can damage the carbon arrow. If not properly inspected before or after vein repair, you are asking for some serious and maybe permanent damage to you. Now on veins, like Roger, I like the way a helix fletched arrow travel with a two inch fletching. Larger veins seem to collect a cross wind easily. I use the G4 drop away capture rest and like the speed and center setting if I move at any time. Anyway you are now into a great sport wether you hunt or just target shoot. Oh. forgot, one way to not destroy veins is to shoot the center and the 4 corners of your target. This eliminates the chance of arrow damage. I also shoot a Spyder target in my hay lot when I practice every day that I can. Always know where you arrow will strike.

  10. #10
    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    I'm all about pinching pennies when I can and spending coin on quality gear and equipment where it matters. One thing I've done is get in the habit of hanging on to all my plastic bags, cling wrap, and similar packaging material that might otherwise go into the trash or recycle bin. Once you have enough, stuff them in a large poly bag and voila, you have a backstop. An old frayed tarp doubled over and stitched together makes a decent bag too.

  11. #11
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    Full Curl Archery is a great place to go if you're in Anchorage. Personally there is no need for 4" vanes anymore. I would get a 2" and start fletching Max Hunter vanes or Blazers. They do just fine stabilizing an arrow even with a broadhead.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChugiakTinkerer View Post
    I'm all about pinching pennies when I can and spending coin on quality gear and equipment where it matters. One thing I've done is get in the habit of hanging on to all my plastic bags, cling wrap, and similar packaging material that might otherwise go into the trash or recycle bin. Once you have enough, stuff them in a large poly bag and voila, you have a backstop. An old frayed tarp doubled over and stitched together makes a decent bag too.
    This is what I use for a back stop also. One fall a mid sized bull took out his frustrations on it. Had me rolling. The very target I practice on so i can drill his big brother, he destroys. It's back up again.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  13. #13
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    I agree with the comments on the rest. Keep it simple. i use a whisker biscuit also. Several years ago when I was still running a 2 prong rest I had serious problems. Had been shooting grouse earlier in the day. No problem. At dusk i spot a shooter bull. Make my stalk. At full draw on what should be a chip shot, one side of the rest falls away, dropping the arrow down. I twist the prong back up and draw again. Same result. Rush back to the truck and try a hasty repair. Try to get something into the allem head set screw to tighten it (my keys haha) Rush back ti bull. He's still there lucky me. Draw back, easy shot, rest fails again. I decide to rest the shaft of the arrow on my finger. GO. Arrow goes right below brisket. Bull walks off. I circle and cut him off. Full draw, resting shaft on finger again but this time I slow down enough to look at the arrow and see where it would be if the rest was there. Raise finger a little higher, look at sweet spot on bull again and let 'er fly. Drilled him. Double lung. He thunders off like a horse from the starting gate, but plows into the ground full tilt boogie at less than 50 yards. Gut him, hook a section of halibut ground line on him. drag to where I can winch him up in the back whole, and gone. Had him hanging at my shop as the last of the sun faded away.
    This was the last bull I shot with that old bow. My Martin Prowler. It took a bunch of them. I'm shooting a Parker these days, but eyeing a Mathews. The Parker has dropped probably 8 bulls.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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