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Thread: Dalton Hwy Caribou Hunt ?

  1. #1

    Default Dalton Hwy Caribou Hunt ?

    I have this vision of driving up the Dalton this Fall and hunt boo...I'm thinkin I would drive up a ways and pull over unload the wheeler and head out from the road 5 miles and start glassing...something tells me there is more to it than that. I head from someone who knows as much as I do that you can't drive a wheeler on the tundra. I sure would like to hear from someone that has been there and done that, maybe just a brief description of what to expect? Any comments or suggestions would be appreciated, thnx.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    You heard correctly - you may not use a motorized vehicle inside the 5 mile corridor unless you are traversing the corridor and you started from outside it. In other words, ATVs are basically prohibited.

    If you want to hunt up there, you can either do so on foot by using a bow inside the 5 mile corridor, on foot with a rifle by walking yourself out past five miles, or by boat or airplane that can take you beyond five miles. Leave the ATV at home on this one.

  3. #3

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    What Brian said and don't try sneaking off the hwy with your pickup to retrieve what you shot....or else!

    By Tim Mowry (%74%6d%6f%77%72%79%40%6e%65%77%73%6d%69%6e%65%72% 2e%63%6f%6d)
    [tmowry@newsminer.com](mailto:tmowry@newsminer.com)
    Published December 5, 2007

    It turned out to be an expensive caribou hunting trip.
    The four hunters who got two pickup trucks stuck in the tundra off the Dalton Highway last year trying to retrieve caribou they shot have paid $10,000 in restitution to the U.S. government, officials with the Bureau of Land Management in Fairbanks announced on Tuesday.
    The fine will cover “penalties, rental and other administrative costs,” according to a press release issued Tuesday.
    “I think that’s a significant fine,” said public affairs specialist Doug Stockdale with BLM in Fairbanks. “I hope this is something that makes people take notice.”
    According to the press release, the hunters also told BLM officials that they spent more than $32,000 to extract and repair the two pickup trucks, which were stuck for nearly six months before the hunters were finally able to remove them by using jackhammers to dig them out of the frozen tundra.
    In addition to the $10,000 they’ve already paid, the four hunters, all of whom were military personnel, have agreed to take part in a public outreach program over the next six months to help “orient” other military personnel new to the state and “promote the responsible use of resources.”
    The two drivers of the trucks were also fined $175 apiece for driving in an area closed to motorized vehicles. Those fines have also been paid, Stockdale said.
    “These folks made some bad decisions and I think they ‘fessed up to it and paid the price,” Stockdale said. “I think this is going to be sufficient.”
    As has been its policy since the incident was first reported in September of 2006, the BLM did not release the names of the hunters, all of whom who are stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, due to what Stockdale said were “privacy concerns.” The News-Miner will file a Freedom of Information Act request to obtain the names of the hunters.
    BLM officials in Fairbanks were instructed not to release the names by the state office in Anchorage, Stockdale said. Releasing the names of the hunters doesn’t serve any useful purpose, he contended on BLM’s behalf.
    “If you look at the blogs that have been online about this, some folks would like to publicly humiliate these folks and one way to do that is release their names,” he said, referring to online discussion about the incident. “I don’t see any benefit in putting the names in the newspaper.”
    Most people who are ticketed and fined for trespassing don’t get their names put in the newspaper, Stockdale pointed out.
    But the incident on the Dalton Highway about 350 miles north of Fairbanks attracted considerable media attention and generated heated debate because of the blatant nature of the case.
    The hunters attempted to drive their trucks over federal land in the Dalton Highway Management Corridor, a five-mile strip on both sides of the highway that is closed to motorized vehicles and open only to archery hunting. The hunters were aware of the restriction on motorized vehicles but chose to ignore it after shooting three caribou five miles from the road.
    One of the trucks, a Ford F-150, made it about 4 1/2 miles before getting stuck while the other one, a Dodge Ram 1500, made it only about a half mile before getting bogged down. That truck was visible from the highway to passing motorists and truck drivers.
    The hunters received a special permit to remove the trucks under supervision from BLM resource specialists. After three unsuccessful and publicized attempts to dislodge the trucks, the hunters finally used jackhammers and rotary drills to chip the trucks out of the frozen tundra in late March and early April. Once freed, the trucks were towed out over the snow by placing sleds under the tires. Workers with Alyeska Pipeline Co. towed the trucks out with Sno-Cats at the request of BLM.
    Stockdale isn’t sure what kind of shape the public outreach program will take but said the hunters will be most likely distributing information to military personnel on bases in Alaska about “Leave No Trace” and “Tread Lightly,” a pair of international programs aimed at minimizing the human footprint left in wilderness areas.

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    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    By "fall" you mean next August/early September? After that it is winter on the north slope.

  5. #5

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    Yes Fall Is August to me...

  6. #6

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    Thnx for the info. looks like I'll be back in Unit 13..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    Thnx for the info. looks like I'll be back in Unit 13..
    Don't be so quick to decide not to hunt up north, walking 5 miles out to hunt is tough but if you have the time and are in descent shape its a very doable rewarding hunt. with the possibility of seeing all kinds of wildlife. and if you have time you can pack out an animal over a few days which makes it better. use a GPS and know the lay of the land especially the HYW and you will be fine. There are places that truly suck hiking out and there are places were the walk isn't bad. Like I said having time and being in good shape helps.

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    ... As to what to expect. Lots of mad hunters and a visit from the trooper and probably everything confiscated for using the atv inside the corridor.

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wiso_67 View Post
    Like I said having time and being in good shape helps.

    .........a whole heck of a lot...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by wiso_67 View Post
    Don't be so quick to decide not to hunt up north, walking 5 miles out to hunt is tough but if you have the time and are in descent shape its a very doable rewarding hunt. with the possibility of seeing all kinds of wildlife. and if you have time you can pack out an animal over a few days which makes it better. use a GPS and know the lay of the land especially the HYW and you will be fine. There are places that truly suck hiking out and there are places were the walk isn't bad. Like I said having time and being in good shape helps.
    The wheels are turnin...next season I'll be 68 yrs old and I think I have a couple of more years left to where I could do that...just maybe I'll plan it for 2017 and make a goal sorta..an impetus as it were to keep in shape which is not easy for me.
    I kinda screwed the pooch this year...after reading several of these posts I went ahead and put in for Tier 1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    The wheels are turnin...next season I'll be 68 yrs old and I think I have a couple of more years left to where I could do that...just maybe I'll plan it for 2017 and make a goal sorta..an impetus as it were to keep in shape which is not easy for me.
    I kinda screwed the pooch this year...after reading several of these posts I went ahead and put in for Tier 1.
    I'd hardly say that's 'screwing the pooch'. I love the Tier 1 permit. It is the perfect option for those that want a guaranteed permit with a super high chance of success (average success rate is around 65%). Not to mention that I love the turf that that permit covers. Any minute spent up in the high country around the Denali/Richardson is time well spent. If you take the same amount of time that you would spend walking out of that controlled use zone on the Dalton, you can explore some amazing country and find a super nice caribou, I'm sure. My $0.02.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I'd hardly say that's 'screwing the pooch'. I love the Tier 1 permit. It is the perfect option for those that want a guaranteed permit with a super high chance of success (average success rate is around 65%). Not to mention that I love the turf that that permit covers. Any minute spent up in the high country around the Denali/Richardson is time well spent. If you take the same amount of time that you would spend walking out of that controlled use zone on the Dalton, you can explore some amazing country and find a super nice caribou, I'm sure. My $0.02.
    I just meant screwed for anywhere else...I have hunted small areas of 13 and in 4 seasons have harvested 3 caribou..my first season I got a real nice non typical..IMG_0801.JPGhe was about 2 miles from the hwy and I walked in and wheelered out. 13 is vast and reachable.....thnx.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    I just meant screwed for anywhere else...I have hunted small areas of 13 and in 4 seasons have harvested 3 caribou..my first season I got a real nice non typical..IMG_0801.JPGhe was about 2 miles from the hwy and I walked in and wheelered out. 13 is vast and reachable.....thnx.
    good looking critter! What's non-typical about it?

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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    ONERIVER===that's a beauty. Good on ya.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    I just meant screwed for anywhere else...I have hunted small areas of 13 and in 4 seasons have harvested 3 caribou..my first season I got a real nice non typical..IMG_0801.JPGhe was about 2 miles from the hwy and I walked in and wheelered out. 13 is vast and reachable.....thnx.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    good looking critter! What's non-typical about it?
    What he said. There is no "typical" standard for caribou, so its pretty hard to find one that would be considered "non-typical". Good looking animal.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    good looking critter! What's non-typical about it?
    Well it doesn't have the two thick beams with the palms then tines...it has about 32 tines in the shape of a big basket.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    What he said. There is no "typical" standard for caribou, so its pretty hard to find one that would be considered "non-typical". Good looking animal.
    I did...thank you...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    I did...thank you...
    Sorry, but your bou has typical conformation: 2 main beams; a shovel (coming forward over the nose) off each beam; a shaft above the shovels holding the bez points; top points going upward from the main beams (in this case a large number). In every way typical conformation for a caribou rack.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    Sorry, but your bou has typical conformation: 2 main beams; a shovel (coming forward over the nose) off each beam; a shaft above the shovels holding the bez points; top points going upward from the main beams (in this case a large number). In every way typical conformation for a caribou rack.
    I would have to agree....nothing really non-typical about this.....Nice bull, but I've seen thousands of em' just like him.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I would have to agree....nothing really non-typical about this.....Nice bull, but I've seen thousands of em' just like him.....
    Alrity then I'll stop saying that...I picked it up from the taxidermy guy when I went in to have it bleached...I love this forum, thnx for all the replies..

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