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Thread: Dogs and Wolves

  1. #1
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    Default Dogs and Wolves

    I have a cabin deep in wolf country. A pack has visited on occasion and come within a couple of hundred feet of the cabin.

    I'd sure like to take my dog in the 'plane sometime but I'm pretty worried about what he would do if he saw a wolf, or what they might do to him if he's tied up outside or if he's dumb enough to approach them.

    He's a grey husky/shepherd cross, a little on the skinny side, so he looks a bit wolf-like.

    I'd be interested in comments/experiences in this regard. Thanks.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    The occasional one on one consensual dog-wolf mating is known to happen, but more often than not, a dog on a chain is a sitting duck. A loose dog might stand a chance if he was really fast and had a safe place to escape to. How your dog would respond is completely dependent on your dog. Some dogs aren't smart enough for their own good, some are wise enough to be quiet and lay low.
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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    My, now past, dog spent a lot of time near wolves. I witnessed ambush tactics as they wanted him bad. That dog would obey any command instantly and that saved him more than once.
    The normal routine was to race nearby and get him to chase after them. I never let him go until one day. We were in the wide open. 3 of the pack raced across the trail very close to us. I could see for hundreds of yards and he wanted to chase so I told him to go ahead. Those 3 wolves dropped off a small rise just out of Tuckers view. As soon as they were out of sight they all instantly dropped and comando crawled behind a tiny black spruce. Holy fangs! I saw the genius of the plan. Tuck was hauling but on their trail and would soon be on them. He never saw them hiding in wait.
    I screamed in panic and good ol Tuck spun on his heels back to me. The wolves jumped after him til I stepped out.

    Most of the time I would not see them as they ran nearby in full cry. (Pretty cool since they were close and loud) Boy that dog wanted to follow, but looked to me.
    I never played that game again. I might let him out of sight, but not for long. I almost never saw them. A lone female (guess) would let herself be seen on occasion.

    Take him along. No off leash unless he is obedient. Let him learn. Take him inside at night. Take a gun.
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    Okay - good advice. Thanks.

    He's not very street- (bush-) smart and listens only when he feels like it. If I take him he'll be inside at night and otherwise on a long leash. I'm still scared about what he might get himself into if he got free, though.

    I'm also hoping the wolves will learn once a shoot a few!

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NunavutPA-12 View Post
    I'm also hoping the wolves will learn once a shoot a few!
    They'd learn to be more wary of you, but they'd still get your dog if they had the chance.
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    Excellent post bullbuster.

    Wolves have also been known to send a female in heat in to 'befriend' domestic dogs, in order to draw them out to the rest of the pack laying in wait.
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

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    Lots of wolves around my cabin too and this is one thing that worries me.
    I let my husky run free and he tends to stay pretty close.
    He generally doesn't go further than the neighbours cabin that is about 300 yards away.
    He stays inside at night so that doesn't worry me.
    My neighbour said last spring before ice out there were a dozen wolves on the ice out front of his cabin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akiceman25 View Post
    Excellent post bullbuster.

    Wolves have also been known to send a female in heat in to 'befriend' domestic dogs, in order to draw them out to the rest of the pack laying in wait.

    That sounds like Burbon St. during Mardi Gras.
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    We have wolves that roam our land and I must admit I love to have them there. Seeing the tracks in mud or fresh snow on or driveway following moose tracks is always intriguing, seeing a pack of them (5) in the mid day at 30 yards hiking a game trail was a very cool experience my wife and I will never forget. That said, I have heard more than a few people from the area tell how they lost dogs by getting lured into a bushwack. I would keep mine close and have a nice AR handy! My dogs are my family and don't know of anything I would not kill in order to protect them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    My, now past, dog spent a lot of time near wolves. I witnessed ambush tactics as they wanted him bad. That dog would obey any command instantly and that saved him more than once.
    The normal routine was to race nearby and get him to chase after them. I never let him go until one day. We were in the wide open. 3 of the pack raced across the trail very close to us. I could see for hundreds of yards and he wanted to chase so I told him to go ahead. Those 3 wolves dropped off a small rise just out of Tuckers view. As soon as they were out of sight they all instantly dropped and comando crawled behind a tiny black spruce. Holy fangs! I saw the genius of the plan. Tuck was hauling but on their trail and would soon be on them. He never saw them hiding in wait.
    I screamed in panic and good ol Tuck spun on his heels back to me. The wolves jumped after him til I stepped out.

    Most of the time I would not see them as they ran nearby in full cry. (Pretty cool since they were close and loud) Boy that dog wanted to follow, but looked to me.
    I never played that game again. I might let him out of sight, but not for long. I almost never saw them. A lone female (guess) would let herself be seen on occasion.

    Take him along. No off leash unless he is obedient. Let him learn. Take him inside at night. Take a gun.
    I think I'd have me a bunch of wolf hides hangin' if I lived in your neck o' the woods....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I take my dog out to my remote cabin. I keep her with me, and she sleeps inside. Same for GF's dog. Wolves will make a quick meal of your pet if given the chance.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I take my dog out to my remote cabin.
    Do you do any wolf hunting out there?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    A few winters ago there was a fella about 2 blocks away here in Yellowknife that was taking his dog for a walk.
    He and the dog went out the front door and when he turned to lock his front door a wolf attacked and killed his dog right in his front yard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Do you do any wolf hunting out there?
    I've seen quite a few. Shot one several years ago. Alpha male.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I know the threads old, but here's an interesting story.
    an acquaintance who has a remote cabin in the Southern Yukon used to spend a lot of his winters there. Plane access only. He had a big MacKenzie river malemute, you know, the 150 lb piles of fluff and muscle? Big male. I had met the dog, and while really friendly, he was a seriously take-no-$&!7 kind of dog. Saw him smarten up a big German shepherd in seconds one time. Anyhow, the first winter out there with the dog, a big wolf pack was frequenting the lake. He made sure to keep his dog close until one day Rigel got out and went after the pack. Last he saw was Rigel running down the lake after the pack. Well, that's it for Rigel he thought.
    Days later, Rigel shows up bright eye and bushy tailed. After that, the pack would show up, call, and off would go Rigel. Same patter, gone for a few days, then return. Went on for a few years then he stopped going out to the cabin, but the dog never was hurt or anything. He did mention that there were some very huskyish looking young wolves in the pack towards the end.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukoner View Post
    I know the threads old, but here's an interesting story.
    an acquaintance who has a remote cabin in the Southern Yukon used to spend a lot of his winters there. Plane access only. He had a big MacKenzie river malemute, you know, the 150 lb piles of fluff and muscle? Big male. I had met the dog, and while really friendly, he was a seriously take-no-$&!7 kind of dog. Saw him smarten up a big German shepherd in seconds one time. Anyhow, the first winter out there with the dog, a big wolf pack was frequenting the lake. He made sure to keep his dog close until one day Rigel got out and went after the pack. Last he saw was Rigel running down the lake after the pack. Well, that's it for Rigel he thought.
    Days later, Rigel shows up bright eye and bushy tailed. After that, the pack would show up, call, and off would go Rigel. Same patter, gone for a few days, then return. Went on for a few years then he stopped going out to the cabin, but the dog never was hurt or anything. He did mention that there were some very huskyish looking young wolves in the pack towards the end.
    That is an interesting story. A real life "Call of the Wild"...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    What happens when aforementioned "lure" female comes to close to the tent & won't leave when the wife is trying to relax while I am 1/4 mile away training the dog in a pond. The other 2 or 3 smartened up & left after the glock was done barking.
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    Would love to hear more of the details on that story, Marmot. Humor us please.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    We were on the denial hwy for long weekend of dog training. In the mornings we would go down the road a few miles & train in a grass field. At around noon come back & do some water work at the pond that was ľ or so from where we were camped. Get up Sunday morning & head to the field, wife likes to sleep in so she stays in the tent which was about 20 yds off the two track in the picture. Get done & head to the pond and as we are setting up (another buddy & I ) hear a couple gun shots. Not a big deal but because we are at the bottom of a hill & below sight line we were a little concerned that whoever was shooting may not know we were there. In addition it did sound like it came from the area where the tent is. So I walk up the hill & yell to the wife telling her where we are & she could come down & watch or help. She starts yelling back that I need to go up there. The story goes she was sitting outside the tent reading her book when she looks up and the wolf is standing 30 yds or so away staring at her. So she goes in the tent looks for the cell phone realizes there is no service there, then picks up the glock & waits. She sees the wolf walk around the back side of the tent & then doesnít see it or hear it anymore. So she goes back out to her spot to continue reading but as she exits the tent the wolf was still standing 20 yds or behind the tent & it proceeds to circle back her way. She said it had it tail straight out & closed the distance to about 10 yds & when she decided that was enough & let her have it. Shot her in the neck / shoulder area & rolled it & continued to put two more in it as it was rolling & growling on the ground. After the shot there was two or three she noticed at about 75 yds out that decided to head for the hills. I told her she should come down & I would help pack up camp in an hour but she didnít want to wait. She had the young man who was helping us with the bird work stand guard while she packed up camp & had everything ready by the time we took our next break. All in all she did well & I wouldn't have waited as long as she did before shooting. To much time $ & hard work into training to let wolf or yotes ruin the day.

  20. #20
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    Neat story, Marmot! I thought I recognized the kid in the pic. (DH's grandkid). I know right where you're talking about. Was up that way last summer for pup training myself.
    There must not have been any of your dogs in camp at that time?? Perhaps just the scent of the dogs being around drew them in?
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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