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Thread: Winter tires for truck

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    Default Winter tires for truck

    My all season tires plain out suck in the winter. I'm finally willing to pay for some winter tires. I have a 4 door F-150, run 4 sandbags in the bed during winter. I run 4wd all winter, but that only helps so much on turns and none for stopping. I commute only ~20 minutes from Hillside area to downtown, but plan on longer drives to snowmachine and ice fish. I'm looking at the normal selection; Blizzaks, Nokkian Hak 8's, what else? Thoughts on studs vs siped? Didn't see a whole lot of discussion on this topic on here.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by a2thak View Post
    My all season tires plain out suck in the winter. I'm finally willing to pay for some winter tires. I have a 4 door F-150, run 4 sandbags in the bed during winter. I run 4wd all winter, but that only helps so much on turns and none for stopping. I commute only ~20 minutes from Hillside area to downtown, but plan on longer drives to snowmachine and ice fish. I'm looking at the normal selection; Blizzaks, Nokkian Hak 8's, what else? Thoughts on studs vs siped? Didn't see a whole lot of discussion on this topic on here.
    You can't lose by choosing one of those two. I run Nokians on the truck and Blizzaks on the small front wheel drive commuter. Both excellent tires. The Nokians are the state of the art and will outperform the Blizzaks by some margin, tho they're awfully spendy. On the point of studs vs. siped; note Blizzaks are siped, while the Nokians are both studded AND siped. Putting studs into a high mileage summer tread truck tire, like was popular among U.S. manufacturers in the '60 and '70's was then and remains today a BAD idea. (Studs add value to an already good winter tread design, but studs can not make a summer tire into a winter tire).
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    I'm running I Pikes on my 150. Siped and studded. Bought them 2nd hand already on wheels. Swap them out myself. The latest trend is the road friendly studs, which are aluminum. Save those for the hippy chicks, and get yourself some steel studs. I agree about the Nokians being top of the line, but most major brands have good winter tires.
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    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    I'm sold on Blizzaks. Consumer Reports did some tests a few years ago and the studless winter tires outperformed the studded tires. Even if traction and stopping distance were the same, studless have the advantage of less road noise and no risk of a citation if you leave them on too long.

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    Member Meanderthal's Avatar
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    I have no doubt that on some surfaces the studs are useless but I wouldn't buy dedicated winter tires without them. Studless winter tires do much better on snow and ice than studded "all season" or "all terrain" tires for sure. That said, why not have both?

    I have 6 seasons on a set of Hankook I-Pikes that are siped and studded. They were such a big improvement over the tires they replaced that I'll probably buy them again when the time comes.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChugiakTinkerer View Post
    Consumer Reports did some tests a few years ago and the studless winter tires outperformed the studded tires.
    The Nokian proved to have excellent snow traction and the shortest stops on ice of any winter tire (my emphasis added)—even slightly better than the impressive studless Michelin X-ice Xi3. http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2012/10/putting-studded-studless-winter-tires-to-the-test/index.htm
    The Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2 and the Bridgestone Blizzak WS70 stopped the shortest in just 26 feet...

    Tires are all about compromise
    Although the Nokian Hakkapeliitta R2 and Blizzak WS70 are ice-braking champs, their resistance to hydroplaning was anything but impressive. The "Hakka" was the worst, hydroplaning at a relatively slow speed of 44 mph, followed by the Blizzak WS70 at 47 mph. http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/n...-ice/index.htm
    The statement that tires are all about compromise is dead on. No one tire will excel in all conditions. You need to choose the best compromise for the conditions you typically operate in. Typically, high speed hydroplaning is not a significant risk in interior Alaska in winter; it's low on my list. The conditions I'm mostly concerned with are hard ice and deep snow, with slush on the shoulder seasons. By my experience, on my vehicles in interior AK, the Blizzaks and Nokians perform about the same in slush. On smooth ice the Nokians seem to have a slight edge. In deep snow, the Nokians definitely outperform the Blizzaks. I currently run the Blizzaks on the one vehicle as a financial compromise. If money were no object, I'd always run the Hakas. That's my experience FWIW. YMMV.
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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Hercules Avalanche Extreme studded. Best out there for our conditions.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default Winter tires for truck

    I picked up a set of Nokian Haks last year for my tundra, and we've been running them for two years on my wife's pilot. The cost hurts, no doubt, but we drive our vehicles for 15+ years and 200k+ miles, so planned longevity of the vehicles plus our kids in the back (and living on a very steep, long hill) made the price worth it to us. Cheaper than a wrecked truck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meanderthal View Post
    I have no doubt that on some surfaces the studs are useless but I wouldn't buy dedicated winter tires without them. Studless winter tires do much better on snow and ice than studded "all season" or "all terrain" tires for sure. That said, why not have both?

    I have 6 seasons on a set of Hankook I-Pikes that are siped and studded. They were such a big improvement over the tires they replaced that I'll probably buy them again when the time comes.
    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I'm running I Pikes on my 150. Siped and studded. Bought them 2nd hand already on wheels. Swap them out myself. The latest trend is the road friendly studs, which are aluminum. Save those for the hippy chicks, and get yourself some steel studs. I agree about the Nokians being top of the line, but most major brands have good winter tires.
    I'm also a huge fan of the Hankook iPikes. I ran unstudded due to the lack of snow the last couple winters (didn't want to lose the stopping on dry pavement) and just put a set on the wifes Jeep. One of my favorite winter tires.

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    All, thanks for the feedback. I am definitely wanting a pure winter tire, siped and studded. Hydroplaning may be an issue here in Anchorage (I hope not for most the winter but who knows), but I feel that's a fair tradeoff for better ice grip. Nokians seem to be the best fit for that.

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    I'm running Nokian Hakkapeliita LT2s studded. Absolutely great tire -- I did some research beforehand and these are the ones I chose (so I can't compare to others listed above). I can't say they're bad hydro planing in my experience. Good perk to these tires is that you can get the higher load ratings for towing. I would recommend these without doubt.

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