Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Removing muzzle brake from 30-06

  1. #1
    Member Boreal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southcentral AK
    Posts
    294

    Default Removing muzzle brake from 30-06

    Hello all,
    I've got a Browning 30-06 that I purchased, used. It came with a muzzle brake, that I believe was installed by WWG. It appears to be integral to the barrel, or at least installed with very tight tolerances. The problem is that this sucker is LOUD! I do not make any friends when I bring this to the range to sight in, nor with my hunting partners. The recoil from a 30-06 isn't enough to warrant a muzzle brake, I think. My question is, can I remove the muzzle brake easily, or is a WWG muzzle brake enough of a hassle to remove that it's better to leave it on?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Many Brownings came with a factory Brake called the "Boss" are you sure it is not factory? If so it might hurt resale value, and served a purpose of more than recoil reduction.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  3. #3
    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    642

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Many Brownings came with a factory Brake called the "Boss" are you sure it is not factory? If so it might hurt resale value, and served a purpose of more than recoil reduction.
    Curious, what other purpose would a muzzle brake have? Flash supressor?

  4. #4
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2dawgs View Post
    Curious, what other purpose would a muzzle brake have? Flash supressor?
    http://www.browning.com/customerserv...ail.asp?ID=107

    Also helps reduce muzzle flip and improves accuracy, that is why Kimber has them even on their smaller calibers. The rep told me they found it greatly improved the performance on their lightweight rifles.

    I tried both of mine with and without the brake and they were far more accurate with the brake installed.
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
    Founding Member
    http://www.residenthuntersofalaska.org/

  5. #5
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,382

    Default

    Either it is threaded, and to remove it, put a round shank screwdriver through the holes, heat the threaded portion gently with a propane torch, and unscrew it. The heat is to break any loc-tite that may be on the threads. If it is Integral, as in the holes are drilled directly into the barrel itself, then you cut it off and recrown the barrel.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  6. #6
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2dawgs View Post
    Curious, what other purpose would a muzzle brake have? Flash supressor?
    The Browning BOSS system in addition to the things already said can be adjusted to tune the rifle's harmonics to the ammunition, opposite of altering the ammo to the gun you alter the gun to the ammo. This is done by adjusting the brake in and out along it's 1/2-28 thread to slightly alter the barrel's harmonic wave by making barrel longer or shorter. Many BOSS systems have micrometer markings allowing you to note where an ammo shoots so you can change to another ammo and go back to that spot without testing all over again.


    If it's a BOSS it un-screws (righty tightly) and came originally with a thread protector for when you don't want the brake . . . again the BOSS thread is 1/2-28 and you can buy a new thread protector by googling "1/2-28 thread protector cap"
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  7. #7
    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    642

    Default

    Huh. That's interesting, I never thought about the muzzle brake being used to tune a rifle and improve accuracy. Thanx for the replies guys, learned something new.

  8. #8
    Member Boreal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Southcentral AK
    Posts
    294

    Default

    Thanks all. This is an X-Bolt Stainless stalker, so not a BOSS gun. Looking again, it's definitely WWG aftermarket. I should have taken a picture, but didnt'. So does anyone know if it's a hassle to remove the WWG aftermarket brake? I was in there when shopping for this rifle, and after it was clear I wasn't going to be buying one of their $4K custom rifles I got absolutely no service, so I'm not keen on going back.

    I guess my other option is go apologize to the people at the range, and always make sure I have easy access ear protection in the field.

  9. #9
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    This is where I would take it.

    http://www.alaskacustomfirearms.com/

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boreal View Post
    Thanks all. This is an X-Bolt Stainless stalker, so not a BOSS gun. Looking again, it's definitely WWG aftermarket. I should have taken a picture, but didnt'. So does anyone know if it's a hassle to remove the WWG aftermarket brake? I was in there when shopping for this rifle, and after it was clear I wasn't going to be buying one of their $4K custom rifles I got absolutely no service, so I'm not keen on going back.

    I guess my other option is go apologize to the people at the range, and always make sure I have easy access ear protection in the field.
    Unless it's a very high end barrel with an integrated brake which I very much doubt it will be threaded on and will screw off. You may need to apply heat if it has Lock-Tight on it. Find a hunk of iron that fits pretty well in the ports and mostly fills them up to use as a wrench. If round ports that is easy, the round shank of a screw driver, a drill bit's shank and channel locks with tape on the jaws, or other round steel thing you can get hold of with something will work. If the ports are ovoid then you need to get a flat bar and round the corners so it fits the port to avoid damaging the port.

    Once off ascertain the thread and put a thread protector cap on, then you can go on/off with the brake at will and sell it with the rifle if you ever sell.
    There are many thread possibilities, common are . . .
    1/2-28 though other than the BOSS seldom used on anything but a 22.
    1/2-32 is less common but out there.
    9/16-24 and 9/16-28 are both very common on 30 calibers.
    .578-28 (37/64-28) is usually just for 45ACP but you never know what a smith may use because they have the tooling.
    5/8-24 and 5/8-28 are both common on stuff over 30 caliber.

    There are a bunch of metric ones and some left handed but would be very uncommon for a brake on a Browning in America, 98% chance you have one from the list above.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •