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Thread: propane refridg

  1. #1
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    Default propane refridg

    I am going to buy a propane refrigerator for our cabin this winter. I am so over dealing with trying to keep coolers iced over the summer! Anyhow, wondering if there are any brands or dealers that I should consider or consider staying away from. I think I will have to barge up from Seattle.

    I'm planning to buy a full sized one & I think I will get one that is all fridg (w/o a freezer) as with our large family, we have a smaller chest freezer going all the time anyway. I believe I'll save space & propane.

    And how long can i expect propane to actually last? We're currently using short cans of gas, because they are so much easier to move around than the talls. =)

  2. #2

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    You might try moving up to the RV size over the B/Q size for your propane needs.

  3. #3
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    You need to look @ the specs of the fridge to figure out running times.
    The one I'm looking @ is 8 cubic feet and uses 1.1#'s of propane per 24 hours.
    You would get 13 1/2 days out of a BBQ tank.
    I will be running twin 100# tanks with an auto switching regulator @ my cabin.
    Propane will be used for fridge, stove, on demand water heater and a 20,000 BTU heater in my utility room.
    You may want to give these guys a shout in BC. The Yankee $$$$ is doing pretty well against the Canuck $$$$ right now and you could save some good coin.

    http://propanedepot.ca/

  4. #4
    Member alaska4ever's Avatar
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    I have a 10cu. ft. regular refrigerator, what I do is fill 3 meatloaf pans with water and freeze them solid. When I turn my generator off, I put one pan on top shelf and it keeps it cold most of the day. I check it now and then and swap it out with the others in the freezer. Works great for me. I just bought my Vissani frige at Home Depot for $400. You get a discount with a Veterans ID.
    JOHN

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    FWIW, We have received excellent service, exactly as expected, from Warehouse Appliance in Arizona. Our refer and range cost about $250 to get to Anchorage. We have EZ Freeze refer and Peerless Pro 30 range. Love them. I would not expect cheaper models to be as good, but who can say for sure. We haven't had to touch them since installed about 5 or 6 years ago.

    Our propane usage is about 50 gallons for a 100 day season, for both appliances. My wife cooks and bakes a lot. Hope this helps, ptmac

  6. #6
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Suburban Propane carries a few.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  7. #7
    Member KelvinG's Avatar
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    Living remote full time I started off with a propane refrigerator and a propane freezer. I hated them! They both were high end, (or at least very expensive) models. Food in the refrigerator would spoil in no time, stuff in the freezer weren't frozen very hard, and I was always hauling propane. I cleaned the coils, messed with the flame, called the manufacture, they never improved.

    I finally gave up and bought the most efficient 120Vac refrigerator and freezer I could find. If you buy a chest freezer and a refrigerator without all the bells and whistles I think you'll find they are amazingly efficient and cost a lot less than the propane versions. I've got a full blown inverter / generator system so having 120Vac wasn't an issue for me. The issue was how much more would my generator run.

    I would guess PtMac's estimate of 50 gallons for a 100 days is pretty accurate. If you are using the 10 gallon tanks, (the tall ones) that's 19 tanks a year. At least for me, hauling 19 tanks in and out was a year is a PIA! (I had switching regulators and it seemed like I was hauling a couple of large propane monthly). For me, going back to plane jane 120Vac models was a very good decision.

    Just FYI, Good luck!

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    love electric- but not a great option for us right now. I am using a Honda 2000 (and a 3500 when I do wash). No big gene system (no $$ for it) and shop/gene shed isn't built yet. I am so over dealing with coolers!!! To hard to keep iced & stuff gets wet. I take 5 kids to the cabin (+ whatever adults may be up there)- so we have lots of groceries & no road access, so no running to the store. I use a 7 cf electric freezer & I can run the 2000 for a few hours a day & keeps stuff completely frozen (but take forever to make bags of ice).

    Seems like were ALWAYS hauling stuff to the cabin. Fuel, propane, supplies & it' always heavy & a PITA. =) Still SO much better than town!!!

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    Just to clarify, I use about 50 gallons (2 roughly 4' tall bottles) for both frig and range, and I believe the range uses the most. The frig specs say 1.5 lbs per day and I think that may be too much. I use frig on setting 2 of 5 so maybe that means a smaller flame, but I can't see it easily so don't know for sure. Both frig and freezer are cold and never a problem, but with frig cost at around $2300, I don't expect problems. I totally agree that the bottles are a PITA and I'd rather haul gas.

    I also have large inverter and 220amp/24volt battery system. I have always assumed that my system would not support an electric frig without running the generator a lot more. I only generate once per day to charge batteries. I mostly use a Honda 2000i to charge batteries and do everything else. When using the icemaker, washing machine, dishwasher, electric log splitter, well pump, etc. I use the generator to keep the batteries up. I use about 100 to 120 gallons of gas to generate electricity in the same 100 day season. How about you Kelvin? I think I could do it with more batteries, but then I'd have to charge the batteries more also. Might be worth it to haul more gas if it wasn't too much more. The propane tanks get heavier every year.

  10. #10
    Member KelvinG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PtMac View Post
    .... How about you Kelvin?
    I was going to post how many watts my refrig/freezers use but couldn't find my info. Online I found a good manual defrost freezer was about 354Kw a year or about 1Kw a day. So for your 24v system it would add about 1.75 amps to your load. The biggest concern is when the freezer's compressor motor starts. Starting of electric motors put an inrush load that can be pretty high for a very short period of time. I've got my freezers on my covered but unheated porch. I don't think they run very much in the winter time.

    But, if your inverter/battery system can handle it. I think electric is a lot easier and much more efficient than propane. What surprised me the most was when I walked into an appliance store and said "I want the most efficient electric freezer you have. I don't care what it costs!" I figured the statement "I don't care what it costs" was their license to kill. I walked out of the store with one of their lower priced units because most efficient means no bells and whistles, (no ice maker, clock, water dispenser etc..) I've got a year's worth of fuel tank storage. So I spend several weeks in the summer hauling in fuel for my tanks. Then I'm done for the year.

  11. #11
    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    Default propane refridg

    I am with the electric fridge owners as well. Most everyone runs a generator at the cabin part of the day so run the fridge during that time and freeze a bowl with water in it to put in the fridge during the time the power is off. Keep everything that can be froze in the freezer too. Seems to work well for us. We just run a Honda eu2000 and fuel consumption is so minimal it's worth it. Also not opening the door often will help


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  12. #12

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    Same with us, skipped the propane went electric. Took the $1000 we saved on the frig and bought another 1k in solar, now have 1.8k total. Frig ran the last 7 months with no gen help. Do fully gen charge the batteries once a month, supposed to be good for them. After thanksgiving, normally gen charge on Sundays until March.

  13. #13
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    We picked up a propane fridge a. danby it does keep things cold BUT if you plan to open it more than once or twice a day it cant keep up. We live up pretty high and have found a hole in the ground works better than a dang fridge.

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