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Thread: Trout beads questions??

  1. #1
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    Default Trout beads questions??

    I'm coming back up to Alaska for the fourth time in the last seven years and I'll be floating the upper and lower Kenai for bows and silvers this August.

    On of my buddies up there showed me how to drift by pegging a bead on my six weight and floating the rivers. We were preaty successfull that last time we were there.

    1) Is there anywhere I can buy some great beads or do I have to make my own?

    2) Is this type of fishing still legal on the entire length of the Kenai? I thought there was some kind of possible change in the regs about three years ago saying that beads were not going to be allowed for flyfishing or something?

  2. #2

    Default Beads and regs..

    Beads are available at every fly shop in Alaska. As to their legality, suggest you call the ADFG and get a copy of the current (2007) regs and read it for yourself. The last thing in the world I want to do is to take someone Else's word...setting yourself up for a ticket!...hint...the fact that beads are readily available might suggest that they are legal...but don't take my word for it!

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    You can buy them up there in Anchorage at Sportsman's Warehouse, World Wide Angler, Walmart, Fred Meyer, etc. or you can order them ahead of time at:

    www.troutbeads.com

    Good luck!

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Beads as they are typically fished are not legal in flyfishing only waters. The area you'll need to be concerned about is around the Russian/Kenai confluence. (There may be other areas as well, though I don't think so.) Get a copy of the regs and read them thoroughly before wetting a line.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    sportsmans warehouse here in anchortown has every bead you will need. i fish the kenai from the bridge to jims all fall and load up at the warehouse. My best luck is on a 6mm orange. Now some of them look a bit milky like peaches and cream some or bright it all depends. Gotta match what is in the river. I think they are like 9 to 13 cents a bead so load up on them and lots of variety and find what works.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    "Pegging" a bead is no longer legal "All beads must be permanently affixed to the line within 2 inches of the hook" (ADF&G) Otherwise your in the clear just make sure you tie them in place not peg them.

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    Stop by World Wide Angler they costum paint their own beads and their beads will not chip. They also carry a big assortment of the Trout Beads.

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    rick p do you mean is not legal in flyfish only waters, or anywhere, because im under the impression that any bead not on the hook is NOT a fly, but an attractor, even if it is tied to the leader

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    4-6 mm works best for me you can buy orange with white silicone on it, but prefer to buy the peaches and cream, or the orange and put frosty nail polish on it in a mottle pattern, this is the best to mimic red eggs, but since the reds aren't laying yet, beads are not your best shot, we're doing well with egg sucking leaches or the articulating leaches for now.

  10. #10
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lanebrent View Post
    rick p do you mean is not legal in flyfish only waters, or anywhere, because im under the impression that any bead not on the hook is NOT a fly, but an attractor, even if it is tied to the leader
    All beads must be tied in place in all waters. Rules changed when the state released folks where actually hooking fish after they had dropped the bead. By pegging a bead it will slide as soon as the fish strikes and the hook ends up buried on the outside of the mouth.

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    so to clarify, it is illegal to peg the beads above the hook? if so does that mean you can still peg tehm right at the knot or do you have to permanently affix them?

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    Quote Originally Posted by buzzerbaby View Post
    so to clarify, it is illegal to peg the beads above the hook? if so does that mean you can still peg tehm right at the knot or do you have to permanently affix them?
    Attractors or Beads. . . In flowing waters of West Cook Inlet, Kenai Peninsula, Anchorage Bowl,
    Knik Arm, and Susitna River drainages (Cook Inlet drainage flowing waters) attractors (beads) when used with a fly, lure, or bare hook must be either fixed within two inches of the hook or free sliding on the line

    or leader . . . For the purposes of this section, a bead not attached to the hook is an attractor, not a fly.

    A bead fished on the line above a bare hook is not legal gear in fly-fishing only

    waters (see page 4).


    From the regs . . .



    I don't see where it says the bead can't be pegged - it must be "fixed", meaning not capable of being moved - or free sliding on the entire leader. A big improvement over previous regs that required it be entirely free sling or at the hook . .

    SH

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    In fly only waters, you can peg a bead within two inches of the hook...but you need to use a fly of some kind beneath it. Some use maggot flies, stoneflies, or just thread wraps or some version thereof. The thread wraps are a little cheesy, but in Bristol Bay, it's a popular way of still generally using a bead without getting a pinch. Call your local bio or check with the local troopers, stop one on the side of the river...and get their take...as said in various other threads...get the info from the horses mouth. I've found that size 12 and 10 stones work well, they exist in good numbers in most rivers and even when the eggs are rollin, trout and char still feed on them. When fish fill up after high water events due to gobs of eggs comin down the river, I've found them looking for something different...then, just a stone or maggot can get em to take a closer look. If not, start a campfire, take a nap, have a beer, and wait for the water to drop and the bite to come back on.

    ps, anything done to keep it from freesliding...is considered fixed, whether it's a toothpick, weedwacker line or a loop in the line.

  14. #14
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Guys your missing the object of pegging and the intent of the law. A pegged bead is neither fixed nor free sliding. When a pegged bead is struck by a fish the force of the strike pulls the peg out allowing the bead to slide freely on the line thus causing the hook to instantly shoot forward embedding the hook in the fishes face. This is not technically a fair hooked fish. Pegging can virtually eliminate missed strikes and is very effective, it is also not legal according to the multiple ADF&G officers I've asked. Your bead must be either fixed or free sliding not one while it's drifting and another after the fish strikes.

  15. #15
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default Hmmm . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Guys your missing the object of pegging and the intent of the law. A pegged bead is neither fixed nor free sliding. When a pegged bead is struck by a fish the force of the strike pulls the peg out allowing the bead to slide freely on the line thus causing the hook to instantly shoot forward embedding the hook in the fishes face. This is not technically a fair hooked fish. Pegging can virtually eliminate missed strikes and is very effective, it is also not legal according to the multiple ADF&G officers I've asked. Your bead must be either fixed or free sliding not one while it's drifting and another after the fish strikes.
    Rick, I've fished a pegged bead above a flesh fly for rainbows for the last 10 years (at least), and I can state with certainty that I have NEVER had a bead come unpegged when a fish struck it. Because the toothpick swells with with the absorbed water, the majority of the time I can't even get the peg out and have to throw it away. I have seen people loosely peg their bead, which doesn't hold anyway. But a bead pegged properly, jamming the toothpick in and breaking it off even with the surface of the bead on both sides, just doesn't move - period.

    The current regs were written (I believe) to cure the problem of folks pegging their beads sometimes 4 inches or more above the fly, which did cause an awful lot of foul hooked trout and dollies, especially in the eyes and the gill plate. ADF&G's solution to that was to not allow the beads to be pegged at all - which caused another problem altogether - fish swallowing the beads down to where they were hooked in the gills, causing an unacceptable mortality rate. The present method is a good compromise which keeps the fly out of the eyes and out of the gills.

    Tight lines,

    SH

  16. #16

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    Sierra Hotel is right on the money. I have called F & G and also talked with them at the launches and take outs (Jim's) and pegging with a toothpick is "fixing" it to the line. I agree that when done properly the bead will not slip. In fact I coat mine with a "rubber like" stuff that makes it hold so well that I usually have to cut the line above it to remove. They won't slip! I also higrade (I know I am anal) my toothpicks. I spill them all out on a table and pick out the largest and only use them. I like the way they hold better then the round picks.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Im in total agreement with the last two posts. I use large toothpicks that i pick out by hand from the box for thier size. I force the toothpick into the bead then cut it at the top a bit long. Then i force the rest of the toothpick into the bead with my needle nose. I cut the little bit of toothpick off the bottom of the bead that is forced out. I have neve had beads slip on me. With the tight fit and the water causing it to swell i usually have to cut my beads off also and let the toothpick dry inside the bead for a few days before i can push it out.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  18. #18
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskachuck View Post
    With the tight fit and the water causing it to swell i usually have to cut my beads off also and let the toothpick dry inside the bead for a few days before i can push it out.
    Alaskachuck, thanks for the tip . . I've been just tossing them in the trash. Maybe an old dog can learn new tricks . . .

    SH

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