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Thread: Infringement on territory

  1. #1

    Default Infringement on territory

    Well this might be a dumb question, but I am looking to get a trapline going this year and don't want to get too close to other people's lines. Not trying to piss anyone off or take their area.

    Thing is, going to a new spot, I am not sure how to tell if others have traps out in the area or not, plus, what if I get there earlier and get mine out and they come a few days later? If they'd been running that area for more than a season or 2, I'd feel like it was theirs.

    Any way to know other than seeing traps and/or running in to others?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    Join one of the local Trappers Associations. They usually have a pretty good idea on who is trapping where.

    And if you have traps out first, its your line. Nobody owns public land.

  3. #3
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Go to a local trappers association with the attitude that "if your traps are out first, its your line", ask around where everyone is trapping and see how that works out for you. LOL!!!

  4. #4
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Wasn't meant as a dig on you ak cowboy, just struck me as funny is all.

  5. #5
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    Remember, alot of trappers wait till fur is actually FULLY prime before setting their lines and this is often after the first month of season. Another possibilty is that alot of trappers will let sections of their line "rest" a season to let populations rebound. There are families that have put alot of years and work into their lines and respect will get you alot further in finding a place to start trapping then setting your traps "first". Most trappers know general areas of other trappers so asking around is your best bet. Feel free to PM me and I can try to help. Remember, most highway trappers come and go depending on population cycles of animals but you can usually count on just about every pull over or trail head has at least a few people setting traps. Good luck!

  6. #6
    Member ak_cowboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Wasn't meant as a dig on you ak cowboy, just struck me as funny is all.
    I can see how it could be read that way. I just meant that the Trappers groups may not know every single person that's out trapping, and if it's not obvious that someone has trapped there before (cubbies, old sets, poles, etc) and you've tried to find out who uses the area and come up empty, it's yours.

    It's harder to find a new spot in area like the Kenai or Valley vs Tok or Dillingham for example.

    OP - Where are you wanting to trap?

  7. #7
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    I wish there was a place to find out where other people trap or have lines. Every year when I get eh trapper questionnaire I suggest that the state come up with something but they never do. I suppose that some people would use the info to find trap lines and take gear or use it against us to shut things down. I can tell you that it is very frustrating to have people come into an area that you have spent years trapping in and lace your whole line. It happens to me every year towards the end of season someone will find my tracks and start setting gear right next to the trail (I make all my sets off the trail and out of site). The best thing that you can do is to go to the area during the peak times and pay attention to tracks and see if anyone is in the area actively trapping. Numerous times I have left notes for people that start coming in on my lines and I am always surprised at how many of them don't care and continue to run gear in the same area. If you trap anywhere there is easy access it is really hard to keep people from moving in.

  8. #8
    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    I set my first trap line last season ( I like to tell people it was PETA approved-I didn't catch anything!) but I buddy of mine who is part of ATA told me if you are somewhat close to town and just doing a walking line, there is a lot more leway. as he put it-"just park on the side of the road and walk into the woods, if you find an area with tracks, set a short line". he says the key is to stay away from the pull outs, someone is normally already trapping thoes.
    I have a couple spots I might try this year, all short walking lines, 1-3 miles ish depending on the terrain.

  9. #9
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKducks View Post
    "just park on the side of the road and walk into the woods, if you find an area with tracks, set a short line". he says the key is to stay away from the pull outs, someone is normally already trapping thoes.
    What he said. You don't tell us where you are or if you want to use motorized equipment. Might try google earth and topo maps. Just walk in to the woods (assuming your not on an already cut and travelled trail) is a good idea.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Back in the eighties, during the fur boom, ATA had a set of maps that trappers could "register" their traplines on. This was kept with the ATA Board of Directors and one person was responsible to keep them updated. I know, that was my job for a couple of years. These registered traplines of course, were not recognized by the state, it was just a way for us as an organization, to help mitigate any issues that might arise. I had State Troopers tell me that they appreciated what we did because it seemed to lower the conflicts. Also, new trappers used them as a starting point to find out if anyone was working an area they had their eye on. I moved to Colorado in 90, and fell out touch with my brother and sister trappers up there, so I don't know if ATA has continued that program or not.
    Chace

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