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Thread: Emergency Plan for Hunt

  1. #1
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    Default Emergency Plan for Hunt

    I am going to be hunting in Southwest Alaska around Bethel and am looking for contact numbers on who I should call in case of an emergency. I am trying to put together a plan A, B, C so that I am prepared. I will have a satellite phone but have heard that a 911 call is routed to Colorado first and therefore is not always the best number to call.

    Can you all help me in identifying the numbers that I need to have on me in case of an emergency? I found the following link but am unsure who I should call first or if this webpage is up to date.

    http://www.cohp.org/emergency/AK_SAR_data.html

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

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    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    I would call the Alaska Air Force Rescue Coordination Center before I called anybody else. (907)428-7230. That is the number the SatPhone rental company provides me.

    You can also find a local number for the Troopers in the area you will be hunting. 911 is for when you are in town or very close.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    AK Troopers Dispatch 907 428 7200. Its their job to start the process. And if the RCC is needed they will make the call. Out in the Kuskokwim, the state will not bother and just call the RCC.

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    Thank you both. Very helpful.


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    I might suggest another communication system such as a Delorme InReach or SPot. The new systems allow a blutooth connection to a cell phone so you can text. Not sure if you can rent them, but they are compact, easy to use, and for the money, cheap insurance. A handheld aircraft radio is another option depending on where you'll be, and the amount of traffic in your area. Good luck,
    ARR

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    Quote Originally Posted by outdoorsman_3 View Post
    I am going to be hunting in Southwest Alaska around Bethel and am looking for contact numbers on who I should call in case of an emergency. I am trying to put together a plan A, B, C so that I am prepared. I will have a satellite phone but have heard that a 911 call is routed to Colorado first and therefore is not always the best number to call.

    Can you all help me in identifying the numbers that I need to have on me in case of an emergency? I found the following link but am unsure who I should call first or if this webpage is up to date.

    http://www.cohp.org/emergency/AK_SAR_data.html

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

    Check this...

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ct-Info_Alaska

    Be sure to verify current contact info.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    I would call the Alaska Air Force Rescue Coordination Center before I called anybody else. (907)428-7230. That is the number the SatPhone rental company provides me.
    Quote Originally Posted by AK Ray View Post
    AK Troopers Dispatch 907 428 7200. Its their job to start the process. And if the RCC is needed they will make the call. Out in the Kuskokwim, the state will not bother and just call the RCC.
    These are two really good suggestions. However, I also suggest that you get a sense of what exactly constitutes an emergency situation according to these resources, and what they will and will not do for you when they come during an emergency situation. There's is much, much more for you to learn in this regard...and you should hear it from them not anyone here. I'd also suggest that you speak with your transporter, and ask the same questions that you have asked here because the transporter fits in here as a resource as well...this I know from recent experience, and the transporter was excellent and got there to pick-up my hunting partner.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ak River Rat View Post
    I might suggest another communication system such as a Delorme InReach or SPot. The new systems allow a blutooth connection to a cell phone so you can text. Not sure if you can rent them, but they are compact, easy to use, and for the money, cheap insurance. A handheld aircraft radio is another option depending on where you'll be, and the amount of traffic in your area. Good luck,
    ARR
    I have an InReach, and it is a great communication tool. I also have a Rescue-link that is registered with NOAA. I'm not sure the cost to me should I activate an SOS with either in an emergency situation and they come...it may not be that "cheap". Does anyone know?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Ray View Post
    AK Troopers Dispatch 907 428 7200. Its their job to start the process. And if the RCC is needed they will make the call. Out in the Kuskokwim, the state will not bother and just call the RCC.
    I agree 100%. This is great advise. I always have an extensive list of numbers for AST, Transporters, Emergency Contacts (designated by me), and spouses. Also I write and distribute a trip plan with dates, locations, and emergency plan to all designated emergency contacts, spouses, and transporters. I choose emergency contacts who are level headed, with outdoor experience in Alaska, and preferable with SAR experience. So not my mom who would freak out.

    Brett

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Been there, done that, got the t shirt! if you need to get out, your first call should obviously to your air service. If that doesn't work, next call is to the troopers. Once AST is involved, they'll take over coordinating other assets as required.

    In our ordeal, our air service didn't answer the phone (many, many attempts were made). I called the troopers and explained the situation. Within 30 minutes, the troopers had 2 contingencies set up to get us out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    Been there, done that, got the t shirt! if you need to get out, your first call should obviously to your air service. If that doesn't work, next call is to the troopers. Once AST is involved, they'll take over coordinating other assets as required.

    In our ordeal, our air service didn't answer the phone (many, many attempts were made). I called the troopers and explained the situation. Within 30 minutes, the troopers had 2 contingencies set up to get us out.
    What did it cost you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by iusckeeper View Post
    What did it cost you?
    Not a dime. The trooper had lined up two other pilots who were set to launch in the event he couldn't track down our pilot/air service. It was a small village, and the trooper went out and personally tracked them down at the AC Store. Our pilot picked us up about two hours later.

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    Doc mentioned having an InReach and wondering the cost if activated. I do not know what the InReach System plan is to coordinate rescue, in this case, Alaska. I do know that when the SOS button is pushed on the Spot, their system will reach out to the Rescue Coordination Center (RCC), who in turns starts the ball rolling. Spot does not charge extra to initiate search and rescue, it is part of your subscription. I would suggest that people, if interested in either system, contact the provider and ask the questions directly as to how their system works, what the added costs might be, who they contact, and if there is any follow up.
    Whereas the 1st generation Spot is an asset, it is limited in that the end user can only send the preset messages that were made before departure. You can send that preset message to only the contacts you established on line at that time. In my case, people who got certain messages such as "all good" did not get the message "I need assistance" (by choice). With current technology, if a person has a cell phone, and Bluetooth capability, I would suggest looking at upgrading so that if you are able to communicate, you can give precise messages based on events of the moment.
    I will tell you that the Spot I have works, and works well, even though 1st gen. I do plan on upgrading as I suggested to that I can send, and possibly receive, texts. The weight of a cell phone and Spot/InReach is negligible. Battery life should not be an issue as the Spot uses lithium AAA batteries.
    When we look at costs of "insurance", in this case, systems as described, at first blush, it seems expensive. But ask yourself what it would be worth if the worst case scenario you could possibly imagine happened? And what if that happened, maybe not to you, but to your son, or somebody close to you? I assure you, whatever you pay is more than worth it.
    ARR

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    If government assets are deployed for your rescue which is 90% of the time there will be no charge to you. Just figure that you prepaid with you taxes.
    "I'd rather be fishing!"

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    A few years ago, it was my understanding that a rescue by Government resource (Nat Guard, Coast Guard, AST, etc) would ONLY transport the people involved. That meant no rifle, tent, or any other gear. Does anyone know if this is still the case.

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    I know they stop brings out gear because people were using S & R to bring out there animal and gear.
    If you're gear is that valuable to you don't call them, instead call the local helicopter
    service to bring out you and the gear.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I know they stop brings out gear because people were using S & R to bring out there animal and gear.
    If you're gear is that valuable to you don't call them, instead call the local helicopter
    service to bring out you and the gear.
    Be careful about the use of a helicopter. Obviously, if it's an emergency, do what you have to, but there could be issues if a helicopter is used for transporting anything related to hunting, especially retrieving gear/meat.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I have heard on a couple occasions that when picked up via heli that the hunting gear and animals were left behind due to legal issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Be careful about the use of a helicopter. Obviously, if it's an emergency, do what you have to, but there could be issues if a helicopter is used for transporting anything related to hunting, especially retrieving gear/meat.
    Good point, I could care less about my gear, when it come to saving my life so I would never refuse a ride from S&R.

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    I was standing on the ramp in Kotz about 10 years ago when the National Guard helo landed after rescuing 3 hunters off a gravel bar on the Squirel (I think) River. The rising water took their entire camp and the only gear they got off the helo with was their rifles and sleeping pads. They had kept the sleeping pads to wrap around the 80 year old grandfather in the event the water took them before they were rescued.

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    If you need one, there is no better sound than hearing a helicopter inbound. If you need it, there is nothing you leave behind as valuable as you and your partner (s) getting on that bird. You may not hear it coming if you do not have the ability to contact them in the first place, which is what this thread seemed to be about.
    I guess I could put it another way. Instead of looking at the cost of good quality communications systems, or redundant systems while sitting at home, or wondering if you really need them, imagine the following. You are someplace remote after an accident. The person you are with is your son, daughter, wife, or? They are badly injured. If help does not come soon, it will be too late. Now what is the value of those items; sat phone, hand held radio, Spot or Delorme? I guarantee you will not be thinking about what they cost if that scenario happens to you.
    ARR

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