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Thread: Canoe lift

  1. #1
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    Default Canoe lift

    I bought a Scott/Abitibi Deep Duck 16 this spring and love it. It is 16' long, has a 50" beam, and the transom is 15" high and about 30" wide. The boat drafts maybe 3" with me plus one, and my 6 hp Tohatsu. The Tohatsu is a 17" short shaft. I got the boat from Two Rivers Canoe in Maine. I want to be able to run this as shallow as possible. The dealer in Maine, who is outstanding, suggested running the Tohatsu on shallow drive. I am wondering if a lift would be better. I know nothing about them and would appreciate any feedback.

  2. #2

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    Do a search on this forum. Lots and lots of stuff on square stern canoes with lifts. Pics too.
    Sid will probably chime in on this thread directly; he's been running canoes with lifts for a LONG time.

  3. #3

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    FYI - when you are reading about lifts, there are two main types that are talked about in these forums and some people tend to interchange them but they are very different. One I will call a "fixed" lift which would just be a mounting block that is raised up higher than your current transom so the motor just mounts higher thus drawing less water. This is typically fixed at that elevation, so you can't go higher or lower while running but you may have an option to adjust it's height by adjusting bolt locations. The other type would be a "variable" or "adjustable" lift, one where the operator can actually raise and lower the lift as they run, so you can run full deep in deep water but lift the motor up as you approach shallow water or rocks without stopping.

    My preference is the variable kind. It is great for rivers so you aren't stuck with one depth setting and also just when you approach the shore line of a river/lake, you can lift the motor up to keep from hitting bottom when you get to shore.

    Two common names of the variable lifts would be the Jackass (mounted right at the transom and holds the motor about 10" behind the transom) or the Klingle (named after the guy in Fairbanks that makes that style I believe) that mounts along the gunnel of the boat with pivot points about 3 feet forward of the transom but holds the motor mounted almost directly above the transom.

    Lots of information already on the forum for the various styles. Once you get a chance to look through what is here, post some more specific questions and you will probably get some good help/ideas.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zack View Post
    Do a search on this forum. Lots and lots of stuff on square stern canoes with lifts. Pics too.
    Sid will probably chime in on this thread directly; he's been running canoes with lifts for a LONG time.
    Thanks; can I ask what is the goal for where the anti-cavitation plate should end up while lifted, relative to the water surface while under power? Is this significantly different than when running with no lift and shallow drive? If so, is the advantage of the lift that the prop is straight instead of angled up? For my set up the anti-cavitation plate is now about an inch below the bottom of the transom, which is exactly what Tohatsu recommends. The water line is about 3-4" above that, depending where I and another sit. I want shallow clearance at slow speed of a few mph. Am I right in thinking I can lose about 3" of depth with a lift? Do people find this worth it? I am only going about 200 yards in shallow water at most. I can also do some poling. I am new to this and just trying to apply the concept of a lift to my situation.

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    By the way, you Alaskans (and Mainers) really know your stuff about big canoes. I appreciate that!

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    When the lift is "relaxed" your plate should be where recommended. When you lift, that plate will probably come out of the water. Water cooled outboards have to be "so" deep in the water to get coolant, and lifting them up can hinder that, but you lower them back to good depth after going over the shallow. The advantage of the lift over tilting up like I believe your guy is saying is that the motor stays vertical and pushing straight forward. If a lift is what you're set on, the Klingle lift like mentioned would be the way to go. Also, Mainer and Family Man did a cool adjustable lift on a big freighter that might be an option. I'll try to find a link to that topic.

    I ran a freighter canoe with the other style lift, one that just clamped over the transom and held the motor back from the boat about 10 inches. It worked okay. I got a Swamp Runner long tail for my canoes and small boats, and a 35 Go Devil surface drive for my flat bottom, and will never have another water cooled outboard again, unless it is exclusively for the ocean. Always being worried about clogging the water intake, breaking the lower unit, dealing with 2 levers all the time (one being the tiller, the other being the lift) just wasn't worth it to me. With my mud motors I don't worry about leaves, grass, weeds, mud, clogging the water intake or tangling the prop. Bouncing off rocks is considerably less of a pain, the mud motors are balanced to where when you hit an object they pivot off it with very little harm to anything, whereas I've had that outboard just grind itself all over rocks and gravel, quite violently some times.

    Look into the mud motors, you might find something you like.

  7. #7
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    Here's some links to lift threads.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...amily+man+lift

    This here's the on Mainer and Family Man did.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...t-Albany-canoe

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...amily+man+lift

    A search for "lift" in the canoe section will yield lots of good stuff.

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    Thank you!

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    what people have pointed out are for the most are true , it depends on where you go an what you want to spend on your rig ,
    most of our rigs have evolved to what we have , the cheep est way is a block of wood to bring the motor up , yes the water cooled units
    need water to run, the pumps are plastic with a metal sleeve the plastic will melt [ I have dun it a few times ] the lift that was developed in Fairbanks you do adj it as you travel with very little water boil over the transom , [ can be ADJ it with one finger when traveling at full speed ] the cavitation plate will come up as you lift the eng & you will lose speed , but you razed the eng for a reason , [ going very slow for A reason an it won't last very long ]
    if the water is shallow you can walk the rig up the river on run your choice , if my rig floated I ran , I don't know much about the long tales
    or mud buddy's , the only thing I think, the long tales don't like small tight streams no space to turn your rig an they don't have reverse, you will need at some point SID

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    Im sorry for interrupting you guys about lifts but I just wanted to say I've been eyeing both the Scott 16' duck boat and Hudson Bay freighter fo a long time now. Still not sure which one I want to get. Anyway, the duck boat is also made by some guys in Tennessee under the name of Towee Marine. It has the same diminsions and everything! The only difference to them is they build up the front and rear seat to make a sort of casting platform. Some of the guys have put 20/25 hp jet outboards on them! I guess that kind of gets them around using a lift.
    Sorry for interrupting. I love all the great info/knowledge on this site! Thank you for sharing!

  11. #11

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    Just curious... What kind of speed are you getting out of your Scott Deep Duckboat with that 6hp tohatsu on it? Do you wish you had more power, or do you feel it is adequate?

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    Yes the Towee is dimensionally almost identical to the Duck. Why? Because they copied it I am sure. The Towee is rated to take a 20 hp engine I think while the Duck a 15 (have to obey that here in NY), and jet props are often used on the Towee. The Towee is more expensive and is made of composites, which might be harder to repair. I have a Lund Alaskan 2000 tiller and I almost love my Duck more. The 6 hp pushes the Duck with me plus one at 12 mph on a GPS. It planes fairly easily. I am guessing alone I would get 15. I debated a 9.8, which might have pushed me around 20, but I did not need the speed as I am not going far with it, and sometimes will remove the engine for drifting, and prefer lighter. I made my own bow deck and extended front bow seat, and installed oars and rod holders and wood floors. I am strictly a fisherman, and this boat rules in smaller rivers. I was told by the owner of Towee and by Barry Davis at Two Rivers in Maine that 18" river whitewater will not be a problem, and while I have not yet had the chance to test that I can believe it. It is extremely stable, and 19" deep. I just wish it was a little longer as I like bringing two friends and that would be getting tight. After having this boat with no thwarts I could not go back. Barry's Maine Freighter looks awesome but maybe too much boat for me to handle on winter whitewater, though he says it would do well.
    With regard to the lift, there is a shallow stretch of about 50' I want to motor up. I appreciate the responses here. I think I will stay with shallow drive and poling for now.

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    The I boats link does not work, but Google Scott PGS 16 and it will come up with nice photos.

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    Billfish, I would love to some pics of your setup!

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    I cannot figure out how. 😡
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    Worked after all! 😀

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    just remember CANOE'S are not for speed the hull is not a planing hull the faster you go the lower the back end goes so speed is not a big concern,
    some of the newer big canoes have a different shape an can plane some a lot better than the old Grumman 19 FT sq end I think
    SID

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    With a sizable Newfoundland. The Duck is 19" deep. I emailed Abitibi's sales manager today and asked if they would consider a 18' Duck or a planing Albany without thwarts. He appreciated the suggestion and they will consider it.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    just remember CANOE'S are not for speed the hull is not a planing hull the faster you go the lower the back end goes so speed is not a big concern,
    some of the newer big canoes have a different shape an can plane some a lot better than the old Grumman 19 FT sq end I think
    SID
    Actually Sid the Duck 16 is said to be a planing hull. My 6hp gets me and another on plane. A 9.8 would do it easily.

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