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Thread: Kodiak; things to pack

  1. #1

    Default Kodiak; things to pack

    Hey guys
    I'm going on my first ever kodiak trip in a few weeks. It will be a combination Bear/deer hunt. It's still a little up in the air as to wether I'm floating a river or flying into a lake.
    I work in the oil industry, so the next two weeks will help me decide as to which I'm doing.
    Next week I will be getting all our gear together and I was wondering what little items that all you guys with experience have found very useful.


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  2. #2

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    A very "VERY" high quality four season tent, that will stand 80-100 MPH wind and driving torrential rain and snow. Lots of tie-down rope and extra stakes.

  3. #3
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    Baby wipes, a good book (Monarch Of Deadman Bay: The Life and Death of a Kodiak Bear).

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    A very "VERY" high quality four season tent, that will stand 80-100 MPH wind and driving torrential rain and snow. Lots of tie-down rope and extra stakes.
    We've got a bombshelter, so hopefully that's enough.


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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdstrike View Post
    Baby wipes, a good book (Monarch Of Deadman Bay: The Life and Death of a Kodiak Bear).
    Haven't read that book, but I'm buying baby wipes by the case these days!


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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Ditto the book recommendation. Good read. And the Bombshelter will be fine. I'd park it where it's protected from the wind, though (shielded by brush or terrain).

    Mike
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    Really, really good rain gear. A Jetboil so you can boil water for coffee or food (Mountain House, etc.) when you are stuck in the tent. I use mine in the vestibule.

  8. #8
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    spotting scope and stand.. as tall as you are comfortable using.. NO 9" tripods!!!
    tall enuf to use while comfortably seated on ground.
    a deer call - I prefer high pitched doe bleat
    light weight hip boots or equivalent

    Extra roll of TP, besides normal use- works well for blood trails, and other uses

    good luck, and post photos...

    Chris

  9. #9
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Obviously the best rain gear that you can afford goes without saying. If you have the room, a spare cook/hangout in tent with heat, preferably dry heat/wood burner. I usually take a 12 person tipi for this purpose, and if wood is not available, I take a case or two of Duraflame logs. If you're going to be there for any length of time, having a nice big dry area to move around in and get warm is a big plus. Big tipi's can be surprisingly wind resistant if staked out well. I think being comfortable in camp and being able to sleep soundly during bad storms (not laying there all night worried about your tent/camp getting blown apart), can make a big difference with the overall experience. It's also nice to be comfortable and have a big area to move around if you end up having to spend a lot of time there. Assuming your going in October, you could quite possibly experience some of the worst weather you have ever experienced while in a tent.
    Good luck, hope you kill a big boar.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    Obviously the best rain gear that you can afford goes without saying. If you have the room, a spare cook/hangout in tent with heat, preferably dry heat/wood burner. I usually take a 12 person tipi for this purpose, and if wood is not available, I take a case or two of Duraflame logs. If you're going to be there for any length of time, having a nice big dry area to move around in and get warm is a big plus. Big tipi's can be surprisingly wind resistant if staked out well. I think being comfortable in camp and being able to sleep soundly during bad storms (not laying there all night worried about your tent/camp getting blown apart), can make a big difference with the overall experience. It's also nice to be comfortable and have a big area to move around if you end up having to spend a lot of time there. Assuming your going in October, you could quite possibly experience some of the worst weather you have ever experienced while in a tent.
    Good luck, hope you kill a big boar.
    Well it wouldn't be the first time I've had a tent blow apart when I was it it! I lost a canvas tent 8 years ago in 70+mph winds in the desert of all places.
    It was a January chuck at hunt I was on.
    The dogs weren't too impressed.


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  11. #11
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    I don't go anywhere on Kodiak without a bivy sack and survival gear. I also take a mega mid tipi along for every ride.

    A badly twisted ankle, torn knee cartilage etc, can put one down and with the ferocious insta-storms and pea-soup fog on the island, it's a no-brainer.
    I used bivy gear there two weeks ago, was very thankful for it...
    Proud to be an American!

  12. #12
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    Instep crampons and a ice axe, a couple tents as already mentioned. But be uber cautious on vegetation that has frozen and thawed or has a light snow or ice coating. Gravity kills, took a bad still there one October.

    Some sort of heat source sure can be nice and I love my Thermacare heat wraps, keeps me warm while glassing and last 12 hours I use one each night.

    Sat phone and a hand help VHF for air and sea is nice.
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    Xtra toughs with extra blue booties and felt insoles plus mountain boots. String of clothes line and clothespins for drying our sweaty layers in the tent. MSR reactor with many ISO cans. You can hang your clothes and bake your tent for 30 minutes with the windows cracked and dry out anything that is sweaty or wet. If you have hiked in Xtra toughs you know what I mean. Nothing says warm like being dry. ( you probably already know this)

    big agnes Q core - I don't leave home without it
    lots of magazines to kill down time
    big agnes helinox camp chair - light and packable
    Inreach-PLB

    Others but you have probably done this before...

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    Member SteveAK's Avatar
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    Did a king fishing fly out trip in 2006. Learned the value of bringing an extra set of rain gear to allow primary gear to dry (or attempt to dry out).

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    Default Kodiak; things to pack

    We've done 3 two week fall bear hunts over the years, about half of the time spent in the tent. A Bombshelter will be fine. One hunt we had 11 days of blue bird (for Kodiak) weather. Be ready to GO when the weather breaks, the place comes alive!

    Lots of good advise here.
    Oh! Throw in a few more books and a head light/extra batteries to read them.


    Good Luck It's more fun than being at work!!!
    P.S. The daylight hours are short short short on a fall hunt. Throw in another book!

  16. #16
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Depands on how light I'm going in, but when flying in and having a "camp" and not lacking it everyday, I like a small solar charger and my Ipod. I like a little country, and if it's just me on a kill, I'll have it as louds as I can, hopefully helps keep bears away.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

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  17. #17
    Member ArcticNorseman's Avatar
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    I second the crampons or microspikes . . . the climbing axe is a smart idea. tough to grab onto that slick grass, but the axe would get it done. The rain gear and tent are #1 and #2 though!

  18. #18
    Member tekla's Avatar
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    I went with the toeless crampons and a black diamon carbon whippet. Used my trecking poles most of the time but changed one out for the whippet when it got steep. The crampon whippet combo is the best I have tried yet. Everyone has given some good advice so far but crampons are a must for the wet grass. I will be on afognak in a month chasing a brown bear and deer. Pm me for some links to discount codes on crampons and whippets.
    Last edited by tekla; 09-21-2015 at 15:50. Reason: Spelling

  19. #19

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    Thanks for the advice guys!
    I ordered the book on Amazon this morning.
    I'd forgotten about the camp chairs and will probably try and rent some.


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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishcatcher541 View Post
    Hey guys
    I'm going on my first ever kodiak trip in a few weeks. It will be a combination Bear/deer hunt. It's still a little up in the air as to wether I'm floating a river or flying into a lake.
    I work in the oil industry, so the next two weeks will help me decide as to which I'm doing.
    Next week I will be getting all our gear together and I was wondering what little items that all you guys with experience have found very useful.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    As an alternative, you can always rent gear from Kodiak Kamps 907-486-5333. They have all sorts of gear for rent such as electric bear fences and mr. buddy heaters. He charges reasonable rates as well.

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