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Thread: cheapest European mount?

  1. #1
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    Default cheapest European mount?

    Whos got the best deals for a euro moose mount? Also have a previous rack that the mount is busted on. Don't have alot of money right now so trying to keep it cheap as possible.



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  2. #2

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    Check these out.
    http://www.skullhooker.com/


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    Member alaskankid13's Avatar
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    Has for price getting it done here in south central AK D&C expeditors I believe it is. They are the cheapest from what I've seen and do great work.

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    If cash is short but time is not an issue, do it yourself. I have many I have done myself.
    boil the skull, you will need a big pot, or cover the horns to protect from bleaching and leave the skull outside for a while. The birds and bugs and bacteria will find it and clean it for you. Then you wil need to boil it in water with Dawn dish soap to remove the oils, this takes a while and great care. Then purchase some hair bleach from a local beautician and water it down so you don't damage the smaller bones. Leaving the skull outside could take weeks or months but the rest can be done in a weekend or two.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Skin out the head, wire it to an old pallet and blast it with a pressure washer- that'll get 95% or so off. Let the bugs do the rest.

    You'll need to degrease, bleach and seal it.... YouTube is your friend, lots of videos on how to.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Member wykee5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by the nikster View Post
    If cash is short but time is not an issue, do it yourself. I have many I have done myself.
    boil the skull, you will need a big pot, or cover the horns to protect from bleaching and leave the skull outside for a while. The birds and bugs and bacteria will find it and clean it for you. Then you wil need to boil it in water with Dawn dish soap to remove the oils, this takes a while and great care. Then purchase some hair bleach from a local beautician and water it down so you don't damage the smaller bones. Leaving the skull outside could take weeks or months but the rest can be done in a weekend or two.
    Yeah, if you are short on money, do it yourself. I find if I boil it, it takes me about three hours start to finish to have a skull cleaned. Prepare to do a lot of picking at the little things. I have heard bleach yellows over time, and that peroxide is a better choice. One thing I tried that has seemed to work pretty good is when the skull was cleaned and dried, I mixed peroxide and white flower into a paste, and put it on with a small paintbrush. Gives it a nice, white, flat look. Not sure how long this lasts, but the one I did that way is going on ten years and still looks great.

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    I just joined recently and had a similar issue not to long ago. I bought 300 dermestid beetles off ebay. I have been feeding them marten skulls for the past 2 months and they have now reproduced into a colony of around 1000. They can handle my beaver skulls and soon my wolverine skulls. (trapping)

    If you can find someone local with beetles you may be able to have them clean it for a real good price. If you have other small skulls or want to build up a colony, you can do it pretty cheap. I have a freezer of carcasses from trapping and for bait. If you have time you can grow your own colony.

  8. #8
    Member JuliW's Avatar
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    I do not recommend using bleach (Chlorine type) ever on skulls. You will not be happy with the result.

    Cleaning skulls is a great DIY type project if you have a little patience, a big outdoor cooker and large pot (pressure washer helps too, but don't use it full blast). With antlered animals you will find they are a bit awkward unless you have a cook pot specially made for such - as most taxidermists do. Combination of maceration (rotting in water) and cooking works ok, if you can tolerate the smell. (or if your significant other).

    Or you can use beetles. I don't use beetles on skulls - I worry too much about 'escapees' - either on my own person or ??? ... Chit happens and that is one big pile to worry about when it comes to a taxidermy shop filled with people's trophies. LOL I have used other businesses that use beetles and as long as I know they are completely 'fumigating' the skulls before I get them, I am fine with that.

    Some people don't want to deal with cleaning their own skulls and are willing to pay someone else to do them. It is a service most taxidermists offer for the sake of their customers, not necessarily because they enjoy working on them And many taxidermists sub out that work to businesses who wholesale skull cleaning specifically (it really isn't taxidermy, after all - the word taxidermy literally translates to 'mover of skin' (taxi - move, dermy - skin).

    When I do a moose euro I charge $450. (2015 price) plus extra if you want a wood panel. I will take the time to clean up the antlers and touch up with stain if desired and also put a hanger on the back of the skull.
    Taxidermy IS art!
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  9. #9
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    Doing mine myself on a caribou. Boiled out but not too long as nose piece will loosen. I have it soaking in soap water to remove grease then pressure washing...YouTube shows people using peroxide 40 with soaked cotton balls and paper towels. Going to find a nice piece of drift wood to mount it on.

    David

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I did DYI on my moose:1. Cut and scraped off as much meat, etc. Also cleaned out the brain cavity as much as possible to eliminate as much grease as I could.2. Wrapped the antler bases in aluminum foil to help prevent the color washing out of the antlers.3. Used a cut down barrel to just submerse the skull and also to keep antlers from the water. Added dawn soap and TSP to help cut the grease. Lightly boiled the skull 3-4 hours, changed the water and soaps once to dump off the grease.4. Rinsed the skull and lightly pressure sprayed it to remove any remaining bits. 5. After letting skull dry in a warm place for about a week, I taped off the antlers and teeth then used spray cans of Zinsser oil based primer to add a couple coats, this left a nice flat white coat and after 5 years there is no yellowing on the skull.
    Last edited by kingfisherktn; 09-17-2015 at 16:33.

  11. #11
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    Here's a tip for boiling skulls. Don't over boil! Use this and just simmer it.
    Arm and Hammer Super Washing Soda



    When doing a sheep or bear skull add about a cup or so depending on how big your pot is. Obviously more if you're doing a moose It breaks down flesh to almost jello and does it fast. Here is a sheep skull I did a couple days ago. Of course with Sheep you pop the horns of the cones first and then saw off most of the cone. This simmered for about 30 minutes. No pressure washer, just pulled/picked off the flesh,etc. easily including the nasal cavity.


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