Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Prop Pitch and winter storage

  1. #1

    Default Prop Pitch and winter storage

    Recently repowered my 22' Searunner with a Mercury 150 outboard. At full throttle I am only getting 4900 RPMs with boat loaded with average passengers and gear. I currently have a prop with a 15 pitch any recommendations?
    Also looking for some advice on winter storage. Any and all recommendations welcomed
    As for prepping the motor I used to use engine fogger on my Yamaha and added stabil to my fuel. When I purchased this motor I was told by the dealer no need for Fogger. As for fuel additive, I was considering Seafoam instead of Stabil. Again any and all recommendations welcomed


    Thanks

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gman_59 View Post
    When I purchased this motor I was told by the dealer no need for Fogger. As for fuel additive, I was considering Seafoam instead of Stabil. Again any and all recommendations welcomed
    Ummmmm....

    I'd check with sources in addition to your dealer- Owner manual being #1, but also some other shops. As for additives, I don't rely on Seafoam for long term storage. It's my regular additive for running (based on reco's from a couple of different mechanics), but it's Stabyl in the tank for winter. BTW- On the reco's of those same two mechanics, I use the Seafoam fogger on my Yami's.

  3. #3
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default

    I received the same info on my Yami for not fogging it. I was told to add a fuel stabilizer, drain the motor and put it in the full down position to drain good.

  4. #4
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    Sorry can't help with the prop as I run a jet.


    I have been winter storing my OB jet the same way for almost 25 years, (Yup, same Yamaha 200 OB jet).

    (If a four stroke I would change engine oil).

    Sta Bil in the fuel. Run engine long enough to get treated fuel through the carbs then I disconnect the fuel hose and run engine until it quits.

    Pull the plugs lightly fog cylinders. Replace plugs. You can replace with new plugs if needed. "Blip" the starter just enough for a couple revs to distribute fogging oil.

    Tilt engine full up to drain water return to down position.

    Grease all fittings. For prop you may either top off lower unit or change oil.

    Grease trailer wheel bearings.

    Put float charger on battery.

    Give everything a once over repair or replace as needed or make a list for next spring.

    OB has fired up every spring without a hitch.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Before a battery is put away for the winter the negative cable needs to be remove to make sure there is no parasitic current draining the battery. Next charge the battery using a three stage charger set to the battery manufacture recommend voltage for bulk, float, and equalization before removing the battery charger.

  6. #6
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Before a battery is put away for the winter the negative cable needs to be remove to make sure there is no parasitic current draining the battery. Next charge the battery using a three stage charger set to the battery manufacture recommend voltage for bulk, float, and equalization before removing the battery charger.

    Or set the battery switch to off.


    Why would you not want to keep the float charger on all the time?

    My understanding and experience is if you keep the boat / battery in unheated storage the float charger will keep the battery charged and it will not freeze. We leave several batteries like this during the winter and have not had a problem even with temps of minus 40F and colder.

  7. #7
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Soldotna AK, Eugene, OR
    Posts
    613

    Default

    I always leave the float charger hooked up all winter in Soldotna, put stabil in the fuel to run the last few hours of the summer, every spring it fires up first crank.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    [QUOTE=hogfamily;1503149]
    Or set the battery switch to off.
    Yes, that would work! If there was nothing wire to the battery positive terminal that could drain the battery. Most boat owner have no idea what is going to the battery before the switch.


    Why would you not want to keep the float charger on all the time?
    1. Over charging a battery will shorten the life of a battery.

    2. Unless the charger compensate for the battery temperature you can over charge the battery.

    3. Charger are not design to work at very cold temperatures. What if it stop working will it drain the battery?

    My understanding and experience is if you keep the boat / battery in unheated storage the float charger will keep the battery charged and it will not freeze.
    A fully charge battery will not freeze, there for there is no reason to keep a float charge on the battery over the winter.

    We leave several batteries like this during the winter and have not had a problem even with temps of minus 40F and colder.
    Have you every tested the batteries before and after the winter to see if there was any deterioration in performance? I not talking about about using a VOM or hydrometer I'm talking about loading testing over time to determine it RC.

  9. #9

    Default Prop pitch

    Quote Originally Posted by gman_59 View Post
    Recently repowered my 22' Searunner with a Mercury 150 outboard. At full throttle I am only getting 4900 RPMs with boat loaded with average passengers and gear. I currently have a prop with a 15 pitch any recommendations?
    Also looking for some advice on winter storage. Any and all recommendations welcomed
    As for prepping the motor I used to use engine fogger on my Yamaha and added stabil to my fuel. When I purchased this motor I was told by the dealer no need for Fogger. As for fuel additive, I was considering Seafoam instead of Stabil. Again any and all recommendations welcomed


    Thanks
    More information about your setup would help. Is the boat a hardtop or softtop, regular or extended transom, is the motor a new 3.0 four stroke or something else, what prop are you running, and how fast are you going at WOT. It sounds like you have a problem. I would check motor mounting height, what trim angle you are running at, is the cable adjustment correct to allow for WOT operation, is their a fuel restriction somewhere, and lastly are you hauling around more weight than you think, like several thousand pounds of water logged foam. Check out the Mercury performance bulletins. I suspect you should be able to redline with a 15 pitch prop on that setup if everything is correct.

  10. #10
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Suburbanites, part time Willowbillies, Appleseeds, and Weekend Warrior Turquoise Miners!
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    Sorry Mr McGyver I have to somewhat disagree with you about the float chargers. If it is a quality float charger it will not overcharge a battery. If the power goes out it will not discharge the battery through the float charger.

    I have checked the voltage on the batteries that I have left overwinter on a float charger. Found little difference.

    Agreed that a fully charged battery will not freeze if it stays fully charged. The cold will sap the charge and now your fully charged battery is no longer fully charged and then it will freeze. I have had that happen.

    My personal experience with batteries:

    I have left batteries at our cabin in Willow stored both with and without a float charger. The only batteries I have had fail are the ones that were not on the float. Many winters it gets to minus 40 and colder there and the power goes out quite often. I have never had an issue with a float charger ruining a battery.

    For several years we were off the grid at our cabin. We had solar panels and a battery bank. The batteries were charged with the solar panels and float charger never had a battery failure. Kept the system for several years after we got power and still no issues on the float charger. Traded the set up for some excavation work. I wish I would have kept it.

    I think having a quality float charger is the reason we have had no issues. Not all float chargers are quality.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    I'm not surprise, I can only tell you what the battery engineers say the proper way to store a battery over the winter. But don't believe me there are lots of ways to find out what your asking, just make sure you add the effect of temperature on a battery.

  12. #12
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hogfamily View Post
    Sorry Mr McGyver I have to somewhat disagree with you about the float chargers. If it is a quality float charger it will not overcharge a battery. If the power goes out it will not discharge the battery through the float charger.

    I have checked the voltage on the batteries that I have left overwinter on a float charger. Found little difference.

    Agreed that a fully charged battery will not freeze if it stays fully charged. The cold will sap the charge and now your fully charged battery is no longer fully charged and then it will freeze. I have had that happen.

    My personal experience with batteries:

    I have left batteries at our cabin in Willow stored both with and without a float charger. The only batteries I have had fail are the ones that were not on the float. Many winters it gets to minus 40 and colder there and the power goes out quite often. I have never had an issue with a float charger ruining a battery.

    For several years we were off the grid at our cabin. We had solar panels and a battery bank. The batteries were charged with the solar panels and float charger never had a battery failure. Kept the system for several years after we got power and still no issues on the float charger. Traded the set up for some excavation work. I wish I would have kept it.

    I think having a quality float charger is the reason we have had no issues. Not all float chargers are quality.
    Agree with you on this, same experience. Float chargers do indeed prolong or at least maintain a battery on many of our toys.
    Bk

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Battery Tender said when it come to “How long can I leave the Battery Tender® Plus battery charger connected to a battery?” “ A little common sense can go a long way.” Could not have said it better my self. LOL

    Battery Tender FAQ #9

    How long can I leave the Battery Tender® Plus battery charger connected to a battery
    In theory, you can leave the Battery Tender® Plus battery charger connected to a battery forever. That’s a really long time. Sales people like to say, “Just plug it in and forget about it!” However, practically speaking, it is a good idea to check on the battery at least once every couple of weeks. Strange things can happen. Sometimes a battery can have a weak cell that won’t show up until the worst possible time. Of course, that time is usually when the battery is connected to a charger, and you are out of town on vacation.

    If something goes wrong, then you have to deal with the question of the chicken and the egg. Which came first? Did the battery fail because it was connected to the charger or did the charger fail because it was connected to the battery? Good luck sorting that one out.

    With a battery and a charger connected together, it’s a much better idea to be proactive and anticipate problems, however unlikely they may be. In more than 99.9% of cases, nothing will go wrong. That still leaves about 0.1% where something might. Learn to respect electricity. A little common sense can go a long way.
    Also consider this. No matter how good a product is, anything can break. In fact, everything will break, eventually. There are only 2 questions to be answered. 1) When will it fail? & more importantly 2) How will it fail? If a product is designed and built well, a manufacturer will set a long warranty period, usually several years, to support that notion. Deltran, and other responsible manufacturers, invest a tremendous amount of time, effort, and money to ensure that their products will fail in a relatively safe manner. For electronic products, at the very least that means no electrical shock or fire hazard.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •