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Thread: Lessons Learned

  1. #1
    Member breth's Avatar
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    Default Lessons Learned

    While out on my 5th attempt to connect with a caribou I realized a few things that to many are common sense or have been told to me prior but until you learn them the hard way it doesn't set in. On the second morning of my hunt I glassed a group of three bulls on an adjacent ridge working toward me and felt I could side hill and beat them to the gap (don't chase the bou let them come to you). I wasn't going to close the distance but luckily they crossed onto a bench below me and bedded, I was at 300yds and let the lead fly..once, twice,three times and to my dismay they stood there then played back down. I made my way back to my pack and grabbed three more rounds and my pack and closed the distance. I dropped my pack to finish the stalk and closed to 204yds before running out of cover, again he stood and 1,2,3, rounds with nothing (shooting at the range on bags or sleds doesn't mean your ready for the field) should have connected as I was hitting 6"steel a few days before. Out of rounds I began to look for my pack, three hours of side hilling, circling and climbing no pack.(never drop your pack). dizzy and dehydrated I decided I had to make camp squeezing water from moss to keep pushing. My pack not only had my water source but the keys to the truck( leave your keys close to the vehicle so you don;t loose them in the field). I was able to break into my topper for supplies and to sleep. The next morning I walked the 5 miles back to find my pack, success!!! I then relocated camp further down the road to where a large herd had been moving through, there in the road was a group of 30 I sprung from the truck and tore into the wood line with rifle in hand. My bino's on the passenger seat and the thought of finally connecting a raised the scope (animals look bigger when magnified in the scope) the shot was true and down went the bou. Glad to have meat I was disappointed to have harvested a young bull when so many were available (look over the animals well with bino's before choosing). With some help of moose hunters I rolled him on the trailer and made camp. Special thanks to all the awesome folks that helped along the road, Fred and Sam from Juneau, the 2 gals from Eagle, the boys camped on O'brien, and the guys from Palmer. I was amazed at how helpful folks were. I would like to hear other stories of hard lessons from the field.

  2. #2

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    Did you check for blood?

  3. #3
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
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    Default

    Scopes can get knocked out of true in the field. This has happened to me once with a rifle and once with my bow. If it's a slight knock, you may not notice for closer shots, but it will make a big difference for those long ones. And definitely practice shooting from the types of positions you will encounter in the field. For all the times I've been to the range, 99% of the other people I've seen only ever shoot from the bench. I even get weird looks when I do kneeling, sitting, and prone shots to the side of the bench. I don't think you'll have time to set up your Led Sled when the caribou stands up from his afternoon bed.

    Definitely agree with the don't-put-down-pack advice. Never lost my pack, but certainly had to back-track FAR to get it when I had set it down to just stalk a few yards... then a few more... then 100 more... so on and so on. Ended up having to go back about a half mile, and that was where my bags, knives, harvest tix, gps, etc. were.

    Another hard lesson I learned last year: when crossing a creek or stream, imagine crossing back with the water level raised up at least a foot. If you can just barely cross it on the way in, ... it had better not rain or snow ... or you better have a Plan B. In our case, we luckily had a Plan B, but it involved adding 3 miles to the dreaded 5 mile hike-out off the Haul Road in the worst spongy tussocky tundra I've encountered. Won't be making that mistake again...
    My signature is awesome.

  4. #4
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    Buy a bipod. Learn to use it. Always go check for blood, hair, etc.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  5. #5
    Member breth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by extrema View Post
    Did you check for blood?
    Yes no blood no hair, even walked the draw they moved through no sign. Think the angle had the rounds over their backs

  6. #6

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    That's good to hear breth.

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