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Thread: I was just worndering how many leave the hide on quarters while hanging.

  1. #1
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Default I was just worndering how many leave the hide on quarters while hanging.

    I've done this all my life as a hunter and have had no problems and when the weather tells me its time to butcher there is no trimming and save about 50 pounds of meat.

    Just curious about what you all do.

    (40 years as a hunter, 18 bulls )

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Try to as often as possible with moose.
    Bring out caribou and deer field dressed also. Get to the house and skin them where its much easier and a cleaner operation. Wastes less as trimming the outer crust is not necessary.
    Bk

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    I never have 'crust' to trim. I butcher my moose within a day or so of harvesting. I skin them right away also.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I always peel the hide off first thing to help the meat cool. And it works as a mat to keep the meat clean.
    Some scenarios might prove differently though. I'm glad I've never had a bull die in water (that I couldn't drag onto dry ground). Those kind of photos on here do not look fun.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    I've done this all my life as a hunter and have had no problems and when the weather tells me its time to butcher there is no trimming and save about 50 pounds of meat.
    I've always skinned them in the field to promote cooling. I've never considered leaving it on to save meat. How do you save that much meat by leaving the hide on?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by injun joe View Post
    I've always skinned them in the field to promote cooling. I've never considered leaving it on to save meat. How do you save that much meat by leaving the hide on?
    I bet he's referring to the meat that is exposed to air drying out.


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  7. #7

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    I have always skinned right away and used to trim the rine. not to mix the pot but an older fellow showed me if you put those trimings in with the burger grind they reconstitute. Essentially it is air dried jerky with no seasoning, Would you throw jerky away?

  8. #8

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    You figure you would lose 50lbs of meat by removing the hide at the start? I have never seen that kind of loss before. The dried out meat is perfectly good, no need to get rid of it. Worst case, add it to the hamburger grind where it will re-hydrate when mixed with the rest of the meat.

    I have almost always removed the hide in the field to help with cooling. The only time I have left the hide on was in a winter hunt when I was confident the meat was cooling down just fine. It was nice to do the skinning in a cleaner environment and an easier process when the quarters were hanging. Downside was I then had to dispose of the hide rather than be able to just leave it in the field like most other hunts.

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    I have always skinned moose in the field. I have always been worried about cooling the meat. We shot this year'a bull at 3:30 in the afternoon. Had him gutted by 5 after repositioning him out of the puddle he died in. Anyway we rolled him onto his back and skinned down as far as we could. The next day where we hadn't skinned the meat was still warm. It even froze that night. Caribou I will leave the skin on if it is cold- winter hunts, and I'm going right home.

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    There are two reasons I do not leave the hide on a animal, removing the hide helped to cool the meat, especially when it come to moose hing quarters. The other is moose and caribou put urine all over there body to attract cows. By leaving the hide on you increase spreading urine on the meat by touching the hide and getting hair on it. Lets not forget all over your clothes and gear. OK that three reasons.

  11. #11
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    I have always skinned moose in the field. I have always been worried about cooling the meat. We shot this year'a bull at 3:30 in the afternoon. Had him gutted by 5 after repositioning him out of the puddle he died in. Anyway we rolled him onto his back and skinned down as far as we could. The next day where we hadn't skinned the meat was still warm. It even froze that night. Caribou I will leave the skin on if it is cold- winter hunts, and I'm going right home.
    Same here.....except I didn't skin it at all. It was Sept 14th, almost dark, and we had no headlamps or flashlights to navigate back to the truck. It also was starting to rain, (no rain gear either....was supposed to be a quick walk in the woods) so..... figuring it would be good to keep the meat dry, we just gutted it, propped it up on it's back, put a couple sticks inside the cavity to keep it open and off we went. When we returned the next morning the hind quarters and backstraps were still warm. That bull was the strongest bull (58"er) I ever ate. Mind you though that he also was bigtime into the rut, and was wet when I killed him after just wallering in his wallow. I learned then and there (also heard it later on as well) that when a big bull moose is in rut, you can't get that hide off of him fast enough. I was lucky and got to eat all mine.....strong as it was. But I've heard of some that couldn't eat any of theirs after making that mistake....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  12. #12

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    I always peel the hide back as quickly as I can to promote cooling. It sounds like what you are doing works for you. This years bull I had the quarters back in camp(chicken cut, I hunt alone and a full quarter is too much to deal with) 4 hours after he hit the ground. Last years bull I got gutted/hide off one side/one shoulder off and propped open before dark. The side unskinned that sat over night was a challenge to save in the warm conditions we had last year... just easier for me to cool with hide off..I don't lose that much from trim.

  13. #13
    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
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    I always remove the hide as fast as I can, however, I never gut the moose. I remove the quarters, backstrap and neck roast on one side then flip him over and repeat. I then split the breast bone and saw the ribs along the spine. Removing the tenderloin is the closest I come to getting into the guts. And then its pretty easy to just push them aside or cut the spine and pull it away. Its the fastest and cleanest way I have found, obviously that's my own opinion.
    Attachment 86839Attachment 86840

  14. #14
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Guys I just asked a question.\

    I myself don't cut up a moose without hanging it for 7-10 days, but thats just me, and if the weather is right I will leave the hide on till the butchering stage.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Guys I just asked a question.\

    I myself don't cut up a moose without hanging it for 7-10 days, but thats just me, and if the weather is right I will leave the hide on till the butchering stage.
    I think a bunch of us were just surprised that someone would or would expect to trim off anything like 50 pounds of meat just because it was exposed to the air. I hang my meat for the same duration depending on weather/temps and trim off almost nothing. The outside exposed meat is just fine. Anything dry with rehydrate when packaged/mixed with other meat.

    EDIT: Just to add, I think it is along the same lines as the people who think that there is some reason they need to toss out any meat in the freezer after a year or two because they think it must not be good any more. I think most think that way just because they heard it from someone else rather than something they actually experienced.

  16. #16
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I skin mine always. Cools down fast. I also pressure cook the trim meat and merge it with the dogs food at about 25%.

    You are looking for 50 deg, give or take, at 24 hours. Can't do that with the hide on.

  17. #17

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    There have been times when dealing with a moose in sandy, gritty, or muddy/scummy conditions where we have left the hide on the qtrs to help keep the meat clean underneath this natural barrier. Yes, the cool slower but you'll save your food in a much cleaner way...which is a fact worth considering regardless of how much weight the hide adds to qtrs.

    But, in 20 years of moose hunting I've only felt it necessary to do this twice. Once in GMU 24 on a sandy, gritty kill site a couple hundred yards from the boat, and once in GMU 25 when we downed a moose in a nasty bog with very nasty stagnant water. But dont rule it out because it depends on your circumstances, however rare they might arise.

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