Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: conex question

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default conex question

    Hey guys- I am wanting to set a conex on some land that is accessible by good road to store some toys and supplies closer to my recreational property that is not able to have a conex delivered. I was thinking about setting it on railroad ties or treated 6x6's. I am looking for guidance on how far apart the supports should be for either a 20 or 40 footer. Thanks in advance. BEE

  2. #2
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    For long term use and heavy gear we use 4 timbers for a 20 footer. For a short season or light weight we just use one timber at each end.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #3

    Default

    We have our 40,45 and 53s loaded pretty good in our yard and just support the ends with 4x4s. The 53 should probably have a middle support though. The floor will give out before it crumples. 20 footers just need end support and they are all good. The 40s if your going to load them crazy then some middle support will help. We have 5-20s, 7-40s, 3-53s, 3-40 high cubes, and 1 oddball 45 footer. Our floor gave out due to a forklift being inside and it being a really old conex, the 45 footer that is.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Thanks for the advice guys. I have a tendency to overthink and overbuild so wanted some input from those who have used them! Fishhook- I have to say- I have never heard of anyone having that many containers!

  5. #5

    Default

    Yeah its in the family business, we get them cheap and like to have connexes because then we don't pay property tax on them! My father has 2/3s of them packed with airplane parts alone. And we still are always needing more! I forgot to mention we usually dont set them level lengthwise, that way they can "drain" if you have something leaking inside.

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Those fully loaded connex's, stacked 8 high at the port, are only supported at the corners. That is how they are designed. The only support I use on 20's is an 8' 6x6 on each end. I like to use the 6x6 simply so the doors are a bit more off the ground.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishhook57 View Post
    I forgot to mention we usually dont set them level lengthwise, that way they can "drain" if you have something leaking inside.
    That makes absolute sense.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Those fully loaded connex's, stacked 8 high at the port, are only supported at the corners. That is how they are designed. The only support I use on 20's is an 8' 6x6 on each end. I like to use the 6x6 simply so the doors are a bit more off the ground.
    That was my way of thinking as well regarding height off the ground. Thanks again guys.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    951

    Default

    If you're in a place that gets a lot of snow, especially wet snow that freezes into ice, and you plan to get into them during the winter, the higher the doors the better. It sucks to spend an hour with an ice chipper just to get the doors open.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NRick View Post
    If you're in a place that gets a lot of snow, especially wet snow that freezes into ice, and you plan to get into them during the winter, the higher the doors the better. It sucks to spend an hour with an ice chipper just to get the doors open.
    It will be mostly for summer things until we get a quanset up, but I understand what you are saying. I mostly need a place to put some building materials waiting to take into my larger property as I can have them delivered or accessed with a truck/trailer where the conex will be.

  11. #11

    Default

    Condensation can be an issue as well depending on what you are storing in there - especially in the spring. They are great toy boxes but if left unopened for a long time stuff can get funky.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smithtb View Post
    Condensation can be an issue as well depending on what you are storing in there - especially in the spring. They are great toy boxes but if left unopened for a long time stuff can get funky.
    Well aware of that and had many more warnings too! Temporary ATV and building material storage and will plan to vent it if my other plans do not happen in a timely fashion.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    85

    Default

    Keep in mind that a conex is not hard to break into. They are more secure than a garage or cabin but if they are left unattended with not many neighbors around they can be opened by several methods in fairly short order. I would never store ATVs, tools and other important items in one if left in a rural setting for any length of time. I'm in the construction industry and see my fair share of conexs getting broken into with tens of thousands of $$$$$$$ in tools missing. All it takes is a torch for cutting or a decent size truck or piece of equipment and a couple tow straps to get them opened.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrap View Post
    Keep in mind that a conex is not hard to break into. They are more secure than a garage or cabin but if they are left unattended with not many neighbors around they can be opened by several methods in fairly short order. I would never store ATVs, tools and other important items in one if left in a rural setting for any length of time. I'm in the construction industry and see my fair share of conexs getting broken into with tens of thousands of $$$$$$$ in tools missing. All it takes is a torch for cutting or a decent size truck or piece of equipment and a couple tow straps to get them opened.
    Skrap: Thanks for the warning. I am aware of some the shortcomings- but any building is able to be broken into with a sawzall and/or grinder it seems. The lot where this would be parked has nosy neighbor within earshot and is going to be just for convenience sake- not long term storage. I have read some interesting posts on welding a more secure 'box' around the lockable area on a conex. If you have any ideas to make one more secure I would like to hear them. Stay safe.
    BTW I recently heard a story from up north where a polar bear opened a conex to get a stored seal oil- that is some strong front legs!!!

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    85

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKBEE View Post
    Skrap: Thanks for the warning. I am aware of some the shortcomings- but any building is able to be broken into with a sawzall and/or grinder it seems. The lot where this would be parked has nosy neighbor within earshot and is going to be just for convenience sake- not long term storage. I have read some interesting posts on welding a more secure 'box' around the lockable area on a conex. If you have any ideas to make one more secure I would like to hear them. Stay safe.
    BTW I recently heard a story from up north where a polar bear opened a conex to get a stored seal oil- that is some strong front legs!!!

    The couple suggestions that are/may be realistic in your situation would be to do what you already mentioned is to have a fabricator build a 1/4" steel box around the locks with just enough space to get one hand with a key up inside to unlock and manipulate the lock. It's better than two heavy duty exposed locks on the doors. What I would suggest is if you have an old beater vehicle that will start and at least move is to take it to your property and park the passengers side of the car right up against the doors. Set emergency brake and lock up. Start and drive out of the way to open doors. Most comstruction sites I'm on park equipment or work trucks in front of the door overnight or weekends.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrap View Post
    The couple suggestions that are/may be realistic in your situation would be to do what you already mentioned is to have a fabricator build a 1/4" steel box around the locks with just enough space to get one hand with a key up inside to unlock and manipulate the lock. It's better than two heavy duty exposed locks on the doors. What I would suggest is if you have an old beater vehicle that will start and at least move is to take it to your property and park the passengers side of the car right up against the doors. Set emergency brake and lock up. Start and drive out of the way to open doors. Most comstruction sites I'm on park equipment or work trucks in front of the door overnight or weekends.
    Skrap:
    I sure appreciate your input. The one box for security I was reading about on a another forum is as you recommend. Also- will have a couple of trucks out there so can park one in front too. Thanks again.
    BEE

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •