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Thread: How warm is too warm for meat

  1. #1
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    Default How warm is too warm for meat

    I killed a moose a few days ago. I shot him first thing, first day. I had him quartered and hanging on the meat pole by noon. By that night the deep tissue internal temp was 64 degrees. By the next morning it was at 43. I have it home now and am hanging it and would like to hang it for 4 or 5 more days to allow for aging. My question is, if the meat temp comes up a little during the day, how warm is too warm internal. At what point do I just need to get it down and process. It has a nice skin on the outside and as of yet it hasn't gotten over 50 degrees. Your help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member bigbear400's Avatar
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    Safe temperature for raw meat is 41 degrees and under . The cooler you keep your meat the better it will taste .
    Owner of Bear Mountain Meats Game Processing .
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    I butcher mine right away. The retired butcher who used to cut my game for us told me that hanging a moose is not a good thing usually. They don't have the layer of fat like a beef, and we don't have a temperature, humidity controlled place to hang them. All you are doing is drying it out. It won't help the flavor of the meat. I often butcher them the same or next day after harvesting and they taste great. Another nice thing is after thawing the meat can sit in the refrigerator quite a long time and still be good. Just rinse the blood off and cook.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  4. #4
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I butcher mine right away. The retired butcher who used to cut my game for us told me that hanging a moose is not a good thing usually. They don't have the layer of fat like a beef, and we don't have a temperature, humidity controlled place to hang them. All you are doing is drying it out. It won't help the flavor of the meat. I often butcher them the same or next day after harvesting and they taste great. Another nice thing is after thawing the meat can sit in the refrigerator quite a long time and still be good. Just rinse the blood off and cook.
    I second this, I butcher right away, tastes good. I've never checked the temp of any of my game. I kill it, dress it, butcher it, pack it, eat it.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    There's much to be said for properly aged meat and many people don't realize it.

    As long as you're able to keep it between 30-45 degrees, the cooler the better of course, I'd let it hang upwards of 3 weeks.
    4-5 days isn't nearly long enough, Imo.
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM2K7sV-K74

  6. #6
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    I agree with akiceman, cutting it up right away is only if you can't let it hang for a few days,/ if the temps are to warm.

    Been eating moose for 50 years and I can tell you if nothing else, the meat tastes better and is more tender after hanging it.

    I'm going to start a new thread about leaving the hide on the quarters while hanging.

    Anyway Congrats. on the moose and happy eating, lol.

  7. #7

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    wow, what a much better year for meat care this year has been so far!!! Last year I was in a race against time I almost lost..

    This year(killed the bull the morning of the 15th) has been really not bad. I even had a raft failure that landed two quarters, and two scrap bags of loose meat in the river.... and all is well.

    I do have a question though...

    I hunt alone, and this years bull was a big on the large side... even the "chicken cut" hinds were too big for me to lift(and portage three times)... so I cut the top pf the sirloins off as a large chunk.

    This exposes lots of flesh and the top of the femur bone. As I said one hind quarter went swimming..

    I've been really lucky and had two great cold drying nights both hanging with tag bags off(love those bags)..

    I think I'm fine.. meat is so cold it's perfect.. would sprinkling salt on the exposed flesh be a good idea?... This is day 5th day on the bone... I'll deal with the back straps/tender/and other loose meat today... shoulders tomorrow... and maybe let the the hams go a solid week..

    Appreciate feedback on the exposed flesh though.... I may start carrying salt in the field.. on my shallow water drag, stay light hunt seems meat getting wet is just inevitable.... standing waves near the end always seem to soak everything... then like I said raft failures, and swimming and such...

    ate tenderloin this AM.. best tasting moose in years... wow...

  8. #8
    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    You said it yourself... meat is so cold it's perfect.

    No salt needed. Ever.

    Salt is typically only used on hides to dry the skin quickly in order to keep hair from slipping.

    It's ok if meat gets wet initially. So long as it gets dry and stays dry afterwards.

    Congrats on the moose!
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM2K7sV-K74

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