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Thread: Bore Butter

  1. #1
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    Default Bore Butter

    I'm trying to get everything together in hopes of getting to shoot my new Great Plains rifle before the weekend is over (weather permitting) I picked up some TC "Bore Butter" to use as a patch lube. I noticed that it will pretty much refuses to be squeezed from the tube. Is it really supposed to be that thick? Would something else work better? Thanks...Louis
    Louis Knapp

  2. #2

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    Yup! Put it on your dash and it will pour out! I believe one of the main ingredients is fat.
    Do you have the 1/60 twist or the 1/48? If you have the 1/48 I would shoot maxi-balls.
    I use to have a Great Plains in 54cal. It loved 425 maxi-ball and 110gr of goex


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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I noticed that it will pretty much refuses to be squeezed from the tube. Is it really supposed to be that thick? Would something else work better?
    You ought to see it on a cold day! As in 40 degrees! Never mind down around freezing. Fortunately it only takes a very thin film on patches. I'm not happy with it and have found something I like a whole lot better. It's Trapper's MINK OIL TALLOW from Track of the Wolf. I stays usable down to well below freezing, yet doesn't get too soft even up at 80 degrees. Cheap too, at less than $7 for a big 6 oz tin. It's even a good leather treatment. I've been using nothing but for three years and shooting a lot, but the tin is still half full. Tried it on an array of conicals I cast myself, and it's as good there, too. Sure lots easier to get to stick to a conical than the bore butter too.

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    Thanks. folks. BrownBear, I'll have to try the Mink Oil Tallow, sounds like the Bore Butter could be a real problem out in the field in our temperatures. fishcatcher, thanks, I did have the Bore Butter on the dash and it did get very soft like you said, especially since I drove around a very long time unsuccessfully trying to find a calm place to do some slow shooting. I suppose that a Saturday, right before moose season and right after the rain stops is not a good time to find any solitude at any of the popular local shooting spots. I'll try it again in the morning if it isn't raining too hard. My rifle has the 1/60 twist. I'm planning to shoot the patched balls for a while, then may opt to try the 1/32 hunter barrel which is available for conicals.
    Louis Knapp

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    Try frog lube if you want. Expensive, but vegetable based and great for BP and smokeless IME.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

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    I'll second the endorsement for Track of the Wolf's Mink Oil Tallow. I've used it down to -30 degrees. I use Bore Butter or Natural Lube in warmer weather but the mink oil tallow remains usable while you're out in the field.

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    Thanks. I'll definitely have to pick some of that Mink Oil Tallow. I did actually get out this morning and get about a dozen shots off. My wife put the warm Bore Butter on the patches for me while sitting in the car...if we go out after a moose that isn't going to work.

    I had mixed results. I hear the bore of that rifle has to be broken in. It did seem to take a significant amount of force to get the ball down the bore and seated. I'm sure between the short starter and ramrod the ball was chewed up pretty bad. I also had a variable crosswind where I was shooting...not to mention frozen fingers. I did manage to at least get everything on the paper at 75 paces after a fashion. I looked at a couple of patches and they didn't appear to be either blown out or cut. Thanks for the advice on caps, BrownBear. I used the Remington caps with no misfires so far. Speaking of caps, which cappers work well? I bought a cheap one which wasn't working worth a hoot.

    There's going to be a learning curve to this but I think I'm hooked.
    Louis Knapp

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    Thanks. I'll definitely have to pick some of that Mink Oil Tallow. I did actually get out this morning and get about a dozen shots off. My wife put the warm Bore Butter on the patches for me while sitting in the car...if we go out after a moose that isn't going to work.

    I had mixed results. I hear the bore of that rifle has to be broken in. It did seem to take a significant amount of force to get the ball down the bore and seated. I'm sure between the short starter and ramrod the ball was chewed up pretty bad. I also had a variable crosswind where I was shooting...not to mention frozen fingers. I did manage to at least get everything on the paper at 75 paces after a fashion. I looked at a couple of patches and they didn't appear to be either blown out or cut. Thanks for the advice on caps, BrownBear. I used the Remington caps with no misfires so far. Speaking of caps, which cappers work well? I bought a cheap one which wasn't working worth a hoot.

    There's going to be a learning curve to this but I think I'm hooked.
    Just be patient with that Great Plains and you will love it in the end. Years ago I bought a whole bunch of Thompson Center pre-lubed patches. Lubed with 1000 Plus Wonder Lube. We moved and what was left of them got lost in the shuffle. I found them last year in a stinking flower vase that made the move and has sat on a shelf since. I have always had good luck with them. They were $3 per 100 when I bought them and am sure they are a lot more than that now. I have sat in the woods for several hours at -5 to -15 waiting for the deer to move and then fired and reloaded and never had a problem with the patches being stiff.

    The muzzleloader that use now was made in italy for Cabelas when they first started their business. I cut the barrel at 24 inches and recrowned it and then very patiently filed the front dovetail and put the sight back on. I hunted out of the trees back then as in climbed the trees so the short barrel was handy. Now-a-day I like it because the sights are closer together and it helps these old eyes. It had the roughest looking rifling I ever saw when it was new and did not shoot worth a hoot. Now, a thousand rounds later the bore is well seasoned and the patches slide in smoothly. I think the new Cabela's Hawkens have chrome lined bores. Not sure I like that in a smoke pole. My Cabelas Gun, Grate Plains Rifle and a TC Hawken all took around 100 rounds to get shot in. So be Patient it will come around.

  9. #9
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    I like that Bore Butter/T1000.

    It does wonders for my barrel. Easy loading, and cleans easy. And, it doesn't take much to season the barrel with it.

    I've got one tube that is hard to squeeze out, but another one, not so much.

    Smitty of the North
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    You can't out-give God.

  10. #10

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    I have been using the TC bore butter for several years and it is the best I have used so far. I carry a few patches with me that I lube ahead of time and place in a zip-lock bag. As Smitty said it does wanders for your bore and makes it easier to load and clean.

  11. #11

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    After I get done cleaning my muzzleloaders I squirt a little 1000 plus into my hand and smear it all over the gun and the rub it into the stock and work it into all the place that are apt to rust. I have been doing that for years and it will eventually even season the outside of the gun to a degree. Last October I got caught a mile from the truck in a pretty good thunderstorm. I just cupped my hand over the nipple, pointed the barrel down and sat it out. I was surprised at how the water beaded up on the rest of the gun. It was almost like it had a teflon coating. I fired the gun off when I got back to the truck. Then when I got home I sat the gun down in the corner a few feet away from the wood stove. Then we got a phone call that made us drop everything and hit the road for a few days so I forgot about it until my next available time to head back to the woods. Then it dawned on me that I had hunted in the rain and not so much as wiped the gun off and left it that way for several days. To my surprise it looked like it had never been wet. I swabbed the barrel out, loaded it up and went hunting. I swear by the 1000 plus.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    After I get done cleaning my muzzleloaders I squirt a little 1000 plus into my hand and smear it all over the gun and the rub it into the stock and work it into all the place that are apt to rust. I have been doing that for years and it will eventually even season the outside of the gun to a degree. Last October I got caught a mile from the truck in a pretty good thunderstorm. I just cupped my hand over the nipple, pointed the barrel down and sat it out. I was surprised at how the water beaded up on the rest of the gun. It was almost like it had a teflon coating. I fired the gun off when I got back to the truck. Then when I got home I sat the gun down in the corner a few feet away from the wood stove. Then we got a phone call that made us drop everything and hit the road for a few days so I forgot about it until my next available time to head back to the woods. Then it dawned on me that I had hunted in the rain and not so much as wiped the gun off and left it that way for several days. To my surprise it looked like it had never been wet. I swabbed the barrel out, loaded it up and went hunting. I swear by the 1000 plus.
    I've been wiping down my rifles, (all of them, not just the MLs), with T1000 ever since I heard you mention doin that on the Forum, some years ago. It's a good plan.

    The fact that the T1000 can harden, I think is a GOOD thing, even it's hard to squeeze outta the tube.

    I put it in a container of Hot Water, sometimes. It takes a while to soften up.

    Smitty of the North









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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    After I get done cleaning my muzzleloaders I squirt a little 1000 plus into my hand and smear it all over the gun and the rub it into the stock and work it into all the place that are apt to rust. I have been doing that for years and it will eventually even season the outside of the gun to a degree. Last October I got caught a mile from the truck in a pretty good thunderstorm. I just cupped my hand over the nipple, pointed the barrel down and sat it out. I was surprised at how the water beaded up on the rest of the gun. It was almost like it had a teflon coating. I fired the gun off when I got back to the truck. Then when I got home I sat the gun down in the corner a few feet away from the wood stove. Then we got a phone call that made us drop everything and hit the road for a few days so I forgot about it until my next available time to head back to the woods. Then it dawned on me that I had hunted in the rain and not so much as wiped the gun off and left it that way for several days. To my surprise it looked like it had never been wet. I swabbed the barrel out, loaded it up and went hunting. I swear by the 1000 plus.
    Your post deserves another repost. I use it on the metal on all my rifles when I hunt - no rust. I also have a tube of the stuff and it is a pain to squeeze out (just put it in your pocket for a while). Easier if you find a small tub. I pre-lube my patches in a nice warm shop and then put them in a small zip lock, which goes in my pocket for the hunt.

  14. #14
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    Lot's of great information for a newbie. Thanks, guys!
    Louis Knapp

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    Just for frame of reference, there are something more than a bazillion lubes out there. Some will work better in your location, some worse.

    A bud of mine decided to collect recipes for homemade lube. He worked at it for a couple of days, and gave up when his list topped 200.

    I have three criteria for lubes:

    1. They have to be easy to use where I live and play, including air temp, humidity and rust.
    2. They have to leave the black powder residue in the barrel soft after each shot, for ease of loading and swabbing.
    3. They have to help accuracy.

    Mix and match those to suit yourself. For me #2 is the biggy, since I do lots of shooting in a day for snowshoe hare, ducks and ptarmigan. No big nevermind for a guy who fires one shot on a good day of moose hunting, three shots on a very bad day.

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    More good information, thanks. I hope to be among those who do a lot of shooting. Mostly at paper now. I enjoy how much "tribal knowledge" there is with muzzleloading.
    Louis Knapp

  17. #17

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    Louis, I wish that they would outlaw all of the new magnum inlines that are taking the world by storm. I love the primitive aspect of it. Those inlines that shoot like a centerfire defeat the purpose. Heck Remington has a new one out that closes the bolt on a rifle cartridge. The only thing different from a standard rifle is that one has push the projectile down the tube. The advertisements say that they shoot with centerfire ballistics out to 300 yards. I want no part of it!!!

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    I googled the new Remington. Wow, hope nobody packing one of those claims to be on a "primitive" hunt! The technology involved now does seem to push the envelope as far as the spirit of the rules regarding muzzle loader only hunts. It almost seems like such high performance and ease of loading should be limited to the handicapped, like using crossbows for bow hunts. Of course if we tried to put limits on modern muzzleloaders there could be some difficulties in drawing the line on what constitutes "modern."

    I suppose It's natural that some are going to desire to retain familiar modern rifle handling and ballistics as much as they can while remaining within the letter of the law. I'm coming at this from the other direction. I saw the muzzle loading hunts as an excuse to finally buy that old timey rifle that I've always wanted. I just hope they start a flintlock only hunt in Alaska so I can buy a second rifle!
    Louis Knapp

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Louis, I wish that they would outlaw all of the new magnum inlines that are taking the world by storm. I love the primitive aspect of it. Those inlines that shoot like a centerfire defeat the purpose. Heck Remington has a new one out that closes the bolt on a rifle cartridge. The only thing different from a standard rifle is that one has push the projectile down the tube. The advertisements say that they shoot with centerfire ballistics out to 300 yards. I want no part of it!!!
    I agree with you

    With the TC FIREHAWK .32 cal that I am buying from you. I have a TC BLACK Diamond XR .50 cal

    I like the traditional muzzleloaders as well but I can't afford them

    When I Hunt I keep it under 125 yards .

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barnlek View Post
    I agree with you

    With the TC FIREHAWK .32 cal that I am buying from you. I have a TC BLACK Diamond XR .50 cal

    I like the traditional muzzleloaders as well but I can't afford them

    When I Hunt I keep it under 125 yards .
    Understand that my hunting world is nothing like what your up against in Ak. I should have been clearer on that. This state is so settled that we basically have a road every mile in every direction. When opening day of gun season starts you will see blaze orange near every bush outside the city limits. For that reason no centerfire rifles are allowed during regular gun season. Too dangerous they say but muzzleloaders with deer killing power to 300 yards and beyond are legal. It didn't start out that way. Back in the 70s when muzzleloader season got it's start side hammer guns were the only option.

    I passed the 250 deer killed in Iowa threshold several years ago. I can count on one hand the number of deer that I have killed beyond 100 yards. We don't need the latest 300 yd muskets period.

    In your corner of the world hunting is a completely different animal. If I were to move to Ak. I would have to use an inline if I hoped to be successful. The gents that hunt with side hammer guns up there are for the most part salty old veteran hunters. They know the land that they hunt like the back of their hand and they know what they must do to put their quarry inside the range of their smokepole. I'm afraid that if I were to take up hunting with a front stuffer in Ak I would be minus my sidelock gun until I had paid my dues and got salty enough to feel confident with it like I am here.

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