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Thread: Paint coming off boats.

  1. #1
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    Default Paint coming off boats.

    After reading
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...isher-opinions Post #17 & 18.

    Having a problem with a Boat loosing there paint could be from not preparing the hull properly before painting or it could be cause by other problems such as electrolysis. One of the early signs of electrolysis is paint blistering. I suggest taking the boat to a professional and have them determine what is causing the paint problem before it get worst.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    After reading
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...isher-opinions Post #17 & 18.

    Having a problem with a Boat loosing there paint could be from not preparing the hull properly before painting or it could be cause by other problems such as electrolysis. One of the early signs of electrolysis is paint blistering. I suggest taking the boat to a professional and have them determine what is causing the paint problem before it get worst.
    Electrolysis is the most common reason. Not enough anode protection is one problem and too many anodes can be even worse then not enough. North River has service bulletin on the issue and require a set amount of anode proction for each size vessel. I'm not sure how it's calculated just know that it requires a set amount to prevent paint blister issues.

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    I agree to many or two few anode can cause the problem, or a combination of small problems adding up to a very bad corrosion. That why I suggested having someone that knew what he was doing look at the problem.

    If your interested Boatzincs.com has a formula for calculating anode weight to get you in the ballpark. The problem with using the formula is that it does not take into consideration other variables that effect the amount of weight of anodes needed or they location.
    The only way that I know of to insure you have the correct amount of anodes weight and they are located properly. Is to measure the hull potential using a reference electrode.

    I did not know about the North River service bulletin can you get a copy or let me how I can get one?

  4. #4

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    Don't paint an aluminum boat or when buying a factory painted boat realize what's ahead. Ask MGH on here how many boats he's seen with paint issues. Trailer queens will last a little longer on the paint/aluminum scheme but they all seem to go the corrosion/bubbling route. Bayweld now uses applied graphics and it seems to hold up well plus when there's cosmetic issues new vinyl is a lot easier and more cost effective than a repaint.
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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Anywhere there is a pinhole on the paint it can lead to crevice corrosion. Every place on the boat where there is something penetrating the paint this may eventually be a problem.
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    Paint on a Aluminum hull does not promote corrosion.
    One of the byproducts of electrolysis and aluminum is hydrogen gas if the hull is painted it could get trapped under the paint making a blister. The solution is to make sure you don't have any corrosion by taking 10 min and inspecting the hull, anodes, prop and electrical for signs of corrosion when your doing your three monthly maintenance scheduled. If the hull is painted every month would be better, not because paint make corrosion grow faster. It takes very little voltage for hydrogen to form a blister under the paint. It's one of the first signs of a problem assuming it not a poor paint job.

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    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    My old Harbercraft landing craft is painted. I am at least the 3rd owner. There are definately some areas with paint corrosion. The stainless steel railings (now removed) had corrosion where the builder just used large sheetmetal screws to install the railings.

    What I can also say is that trying to remove all the paint has proven to be a bear because they do have their painting process down, BUT being painted they are succeptable to scratches like a car or truck and that sucks. Fortunately for me the boat is way beyond that. I no longer use fenders and all those people with pretty boats give me a wide berth at the harbor heh heh heh.

    I pity the fool with a brand new painted aluminum boat. I at one time had a brand new Hewescraft OceanPro that had a green decal and Sharkhide protectant. It sucked getting that first dock rash through the Sharkhide. And it was bitter sweet to get lead weights slapped against the hull from a few good halibut.

    Sobie2

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    sobie. are you saying you would prefer bare aluminum without sharkhide?


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