Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21

Thread: Tippet material: fluorocarbon vs. nylon

  1. #1
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Happily in So Cal.
    Posts
    583

    Default Tippet material: fluorocarbon vs. nylon

    Nylon is way cheaper, but does it make a difference?
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  2. #2
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    I use Super FC Sniper (100% fluorocarbon) by Sunline for my tippet and build my own tapered leaders with it. It is strong, durable, has limited stretch, sinks well, makes beautiful knots, and is crystal clear in the water. Does it make a difference? In my opinion, yes it does, and it doesn't take long to realize its quality when you start using it.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  3. #3
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    I use Super FC Sniper (100% fluorocarbon) by Sunline for my tippet and build my own tapered leaders with it. It is strong, durable, has limited stretch, sinks well, makes beautiful knots, and is crystal clear in the water. Does it make a difference? In my opinion, yes it does, and it doesn't take long to realize its quality when you start using it.
    I also highly recommend Sniper
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    29

    Default

    I also like FC-Sniper, but this summer I fished quite a bit in western Alaska and northern British Columbia, and many really experienced guys are switching back to Maxima Ultragreen for great knot strength and durability. Except in very clear waters, with leader shy fish, I suspect it makes no difference. I did a little experiment on one of the Bristol Bay streams and fished Flurocarbon vs Maxima on and off all day. Slightly more fish on Maxima but basically equivalent.

  5. #5
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Happily in So Cal.
    Posts
    583

    Default

    Thanks guys. Can I just tie up some 8lb to 5lb to 3lb, and call it a leader?
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  6. #6
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    Thanks guys. Can I just tie up some 8lb to 5lb to 3lb, and call it a leader?
    That would be a homemade tapered leader. I usually start with a heavier butt section to attach to my fly line, like 30# ultragreen. Loop to loop is the preferred connection method and nail knot second best imo. I use blood knots to tie the leader parts together.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  7. #7
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    That would be a homemade tapered leader. I usually start with a heavier butt section to attach to my fly line, like 30# ultragreen. Loop to loop is the preferred connection method and nail knot second best imo. I use blood knots to tie the leader parts together.
    Instead of blood knots, I use a double surgeons. It's easier and I'm just too lazy to tie a blood knot
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  8. #8

    Default

    I use PLine Copolymer Fluoroclear exclusively in here in Alaska. I don't think the "invisble" aspects of fluoro mean poop up here, compared to heavily fished trout waters down south, but I like the PLine for it's stiffness. It's stiffer than mono of the same diameter/strength, making it better for the bigger, heavier, more wind resistant flies we typically use. You'll immediately notice the difference in casting.

  9. #9
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I use PLine Copolymer Fluoroclear exclusively in here in Alaska. I don't think the "invisble" aspects of fluoro mean poop up here, compared to heavily fished trout waters down south, but I like the PLine for it's stiffness. It's stiffer than mono of the same diameter/strength, making it better for the bigger, heavier, more wind resistant flies we typically use. You'll immediately notice the difference in casting.
    I tried the fluoroclear in 6lb as tippet. Didn't like it as it seemed weaker more fragile to me than 6lb sniper.

    In areas of the state (Kpen, Matsu) that see more pressure than western Alaska or Kodiak island for example, I believe the clarity of the fluoro does make a difference. Especially when nymphing.

    Just my 2
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  10. #10

    Default

    Could be.... No experience there. I'm using it for general use in salt, including a lot of silvers and kings. The 10# is amply strong for our cohos which can average 15# late in the fall, and the 15# has been dandy for offshore kings to 42# this year. Just a matter of different applications and needs.

  11. #11
    Member icb12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,038

    Default

    I've used Maxima forever. Recently been trying the sniper.

    Cant really say there has been much of a difference for me in the fish count department.

    The sniper sure looks good though, and feels good, it may or may not cast better. Part of me says it does, but part of me says maybe that was all in my head.

    I use double surgeons. I always start my but section at whatever weight the core of my fly line is. I step down to however small I feel like fishing.
    My segments get shorter with each smaller diameter. IE-my butt section looped to the fly line is the longest.

    In all honesty though, been plenty of times ive just peeled off a chunk of 8# maxima and looped it on. Still catches fish. Sometimes I wonder if maybe we overthink the situation too much as fisherpeople. Time and place for it I suppose

  12. #12
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by icb12 View Post
    In all honesty though, been plenty of times ive just peeled off a chunk of 8# maxima and looped it on. Still catches fish. Sometimes I wonder if maybe we overthink the situation too much as fisherpeople. Time and place for it I suppose
    Yup. It can be simple and work well. For me I certainly overthink my setups and enjoy the gear work of tying 7-10 knots to make a 9-15' custom leader. It sure is nice though to string up a two hander and tie on 3' of ultra green and call it good.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  13. #13
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Happily in So Cal.
    Posts
    583

    Default

    Thanks guys, I'm learning a lot. If I want to fish with a 6x tippet for small trout, what weight line should I make the leader out of?

    10lb, down to 5lb, to the 6x tippet?
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  14. #14
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    Thanks guys, I'm learning a lot. If I want to fish with a 6x tippet for small trout, what weight line should I make the leader out of?

    10lb, down to 5lb, to the 6x tippet?
    That setup sounds reasonable. As for the tippet, it depends on what the 6x is rated. For optimal performance and presentation you will want to tie that tippet onto line that is slightly heavier rated and slightly larger in diameter.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  15. #15
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    5819'59"N 13429'49"W
    Posts
    413

    Default

    Leader construction can be as simple or complicated as you want to be, but there are a few things to take in to consideration...

    What size flyline are you making a leader for?
    How far do you expect to be casting?
    will you be using weighted flies or splitshot?

    It is a good idea to use a butt section no smaller than .020" - even on a 3wt line, this represents about 50%-60% of the flyline terminal diameter. The idea here is to efficiently transfer energy from the flyline to leader, and too thin of a butt section makes for poor energy transfer.

    Simply put, shorter casts require shorter leaders. If you are fishing 15'-25' away from you all day, it makes no sense to have a leader longer than 7' - any longer, and there isn't enough flyline out the tip of the rod to consistently and efficiently load the rod.

    If you are using heavily weighted flies and / or splitshot, the turnover effect of the tapered leader is (mostly) negated - all you need is a straight section of mono attached to a short, relatively thick butt section.

    A common idea in tapered leader construction is the 60-20-20 rule, where 60% of the leader length is butt section, 20% is taper, and 20% is tippet - this formula works well in a wide variety of settings.

    As for material, personal preference plays a large role. I prefer fluoro for many applications, Maxima mono for others. When skating or dead-drifting dries I use mono, as fluoro has a higher specific gravity and tends to sink easier. For super-wary trout and steelhead or on very sunny days I use fluoro for its refractive index and for the fact that it doesn't cast as sharp a shadow as mono.

  16. #16
    Member DannerAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Whiskey River
    Posts
    1,161

    Default

    Thanks for the considerations G. Advice and insight from a fisha like you is always taken seriously.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

  17. #17
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,837

    Default

    Spot on
    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    Leader construction can be as simple or complicated as you want to be, but there are a few things to take in to consideration...

    What size flyline are you making a leader for?
    How far do you expect to be casting?
    will you be using weighted flies or splitshot?

    It is a good idea to use a butt section no smaller than .020" - even on a 3wt line, this represents about 50%-60% of the flyline terminal diameter. The idea here is to efficiently transfer energy from the flyline to leader, and too thin of a butt section makes for poor energy transfer.

    Simply put, shorter casts require shorter leaders. If you are fishing 15'-25' away from you all day, it makes no sense to have a leader longer than 7' - any longer, and there isn't enough flyline out the tip of the rod to consistently and efficiently load the rod.

    If you are using heavily weighted flies and / or splitshot, the turnover effect of the tapered leader is (mostly) negated - all you need is a straight section of mono attached to a short, relatively thick butt section.

    A common idea in tapered leader construction is the 60-20-20 rule, where 60% of the leader length is butt section, 20% is taper, and 20% is tippet - this formula works well in a wide variety of settings.

    As for material, personal preference plays a large role. I prefer fluoro for many applications, Maxima mono for others. When skating or dead-drifting dries I use mono, as fluoro has a higher specific gravity and tends to sink easier. For super-wary trout and steelhead or on very sunny days I use fluoro for its refractive index and for the fact that it doesn't cast as sharp a shadow as mono.
    http://www.myfishingpictures.com/watermark.php?file=133776
    Jedi Salmon Powers Activated!
    www.alaskansalmonslayers.com


  18. #18
    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    212

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
    Thanks guys, I'm learning a lot. If I want to fish with a 6x tippet for small trout, what weight line should I make the leader out of?

    10lb, down to 5lb, to the 6x tippet?
    Also keep in mind that if you're tapering your own leaders, that many knots (blood knots especially) need to have similar line diameters to properly set and hold. You could tie 40 lb to 8 lb all day long, but it'll slip. So when you're buying leader and tippet spools, it'll have the diameter of the material on the label. For blood knots, I like to keep the two lines within .003 of each other or so. And that said, I've gotten away from tapered leaders and run a much simpler leader system now. But you also have to remember to keep you materials fairly close as far as size so you get proper energy transfer down the leader. Again, if you went from 40 lb to 8 lb, your leader won't unfurl properly and your casts will be for crap and you'll never hit your target. Energy transfer is the whole purpose of a tapered leader.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,593

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kodiakfly View Post
    Also keep in mind that if you're tapering your own leaders, that many knots (blood knots especially) need to have similar line diameters to properly set and hold. You could tie 40 lb to 8 lb all day long, but it'll slip. So when you're buying leader and tippet spools, it'll have the diameter of the material on the label. For blood knots, I like to keep the two lines within .003 of each other or so. And that said, I've gotten away from tapered leaders and run a much simpler leader system now. But you also have to remember to keep you materials fairly close as far as size so you get proper energy transfer down the leader. Again, if you went from 40 lb to 8 lb, your leader won't unfurl properly and your casts will be for crap and you'll never hit your target. Energy transfer is the whole purpose of a tapered leader.
    When I tie a blood knot where the diameters of the line are fairly dissimilar (say 40lb to 10lb), I simply use extra twists of the small diameter line (compared to 3 twists of the large dia). That seems to cure any slippage of small dia off the large dia. I don't normally do it, but sometimes ya gotta use what's at hand.
    A "tapered" leader, should involve some sort of progressive loss of diameter from butt to tippet.

  20. #20

    Default

    That's a big Roger on the extra twists. Another good tactic is to double the small one before tying the Blood Knot.

    One place you get into the big/small situation is joining a shock tippet to the small "class" tippet when dealing with toothy fish. I regularly knot 60#, 80# or even 100# to 10# or 15#. Best way I've found for that is back-to-back Nail Knots, 3 twists of the heavy and 5 twists of the light.

    If I'm really concerned about landing fish and take the time, I'll tie a Bimini in the small to form a long loop, then pinch together both legs of the loop and use as a "double line" for tying to the shock tippet. Tradition sezz use an Albright to join class tippets to shock tippets, but the back-to-back Nails work a lot better for me.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •