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Thread: Goat hunting advice.

  1. #1

    Default Goat hunting advice.

    Hey everyone.

    Please don't blow my doors off!

    I drew a goat tag for resurrection peninsula. This is my first time ever perusing goats, to tell you the truth it's never been that high on my list! BUT IT IS NOW!
    I took a royal butt kicking last week hunting. I used my drift boat to access some spots. The real problem I had was getting to the Billy's! I refuse to kill a nanny. I want a billy and I know now what a well earned trophy they are.
    I guess the county I had chosen was wrong. I had no trouble reaching some of the nannys, but all the Billy's I found were out of my reach. They were in impossible county to reach them. Clear at the top! I had a friend with climbing experience with me and he even agreed that without proper gear it would be nuts to attempt.
    I guess my question is.... Do I wait until later in the year and hope they come down? Do I go find a different spot all together?

    I need to make a new plan. But I've also got to find someone else to go with me. My wife said I was absolutely not going alone lol
    Any advice from knowledgeable goat hunters is greatly appreciated

    Thanks, Kris


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  2. #2
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    Wait till the latter part of September, when snow pushes goats lower. And besides, the pelt quality will be much better by then. My opinion is why would anyone want to shoot a mountain goat in August, when the pelt quality is so poor?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverick940 View Post
    My opinion is why would anyone want to shoot a mountain goat in August, when the pelt quality is so poor?
    Because the days are longer, weather is milder, and the hide may not be the primary concern. To each their own, but there are plenty of reasons to hunt goats in August.

  4. #4
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Although it's real nice to get a nice full hide on a goat later on in the season, weather can do in a hunt pretty easy then......it has for me. A taxidermist friend of mine tried to get a Nov goat for a life size mount for years and years and never did. I'll keep trying for a late goat as well, but this one looks pretty dang nice to me.... http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Tustumena-goat
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  5. #5
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    I took a mid Sept goat back in 08 down in Ketch, had a real nice hide, also took a labor Day goat here in Kodiak in 12, aslo had a nice uniform coat that was about 2-3" deep. I've been trying for an trad archery late winter goat since that one.....Still searching. If you want to hunt goats, go early, if you want to possibly hunt goats, go later.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

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  6. #6
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    Hi Kris,
    I think you have several options and you listed them already; a different spot, wait until a different time, going with a friend with experience, and proper gear.

    I have found that some basic climbing and mountaineering experience has been helpful with safely getting goats. Having said that, I've not gotten goats more than I've gotten them. Remember that the successful goat hunter is the one that returns home.

    I suggest that if you start chasing goats around the mountains have the proper gear (and knowledge):
    stiff boots, like mountaineering boots
    good rain gear
    an ice axe or a snowscopic
    instep crampons
    a thin rappel rope and ultralight harness for safely recovering a goat that has fallen into an area that is slippery or steep.

    I have hunted wearing a climbing helmet because of rocks that get kicked loose by my (climbing) hunting partner, but it's not always needed.

    Good luck. Let me know if you're looking for more specifics.

  7. #7
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    I had to put down my delicious August Goat Meat filled Nachos to reply to your post.
    This is what a big B&C billy looks like. Sorry can't share how delicious it is over the Internet!


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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    I had to put down my delicious August Goat Meat filled Nachos to reply to your post.
    This is what a big B&C billy looks like. Sorry can't share how delicious it is over the Internet!


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    Nice goat!!!!
    I wished I would've seen one in a similar location lol! I'm pretty sure the goats I was trying to hunt were eating rocks! Lol


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  9. #9
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    To each his own, but for me hide/hair is the true measure of a goat. Here is a fur ball I got mid October last year. Its worth the wait.
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  10. #10
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Like this one in Sept.....


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  11. #11
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beerhunter View Post
    Remember that the successful goat hunter is the one that returns home.
    I'll echo this statement. I'm not an experienced mountaineer by any means, and the older I get the more that becomes apparent. Having said that, I purposefully don't take mountaineering gear. I don't even want to tempt myself into getting into something that I won't be able to safely get out of, plus I can travel that much lighter without that extra gear. There have been numerous times that I could have taken billies, but it would have taken some fairly technical maneuvering to get to them or retrieve them and I wasn't prepared for that so didn't even think about taking the shot. I have never had an issue making that decision, and I've always made it home safe and unscathed. I've been goat hunting every year now for the last 5 or 6 years and finely got the monkey off my back last year with a smallish, but very thick haired, mid Oct. Kodiak billy. My advice would be to just keep on keeping on, don't get in over your head, and don't try and force it. When you do score, you may just end up with some of the tastiest wild game you've ever had, and you may wonder how does this meat taste so incredible when all these things have available to eat are rocks.

    Now having not answered your question, I think you should look at different areas (a little more accessible) and hopefully if your not able to fill your tag initially, the snow will eventually move in and push the billies down a little. Good luck man.

  12. #12
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Note the continued theme in all the attached grip and grins..... Flat, Flat, Flat
    You have to be proficient with your weapon and know how to place an accurate shot. Wait until your goat is in a good location, get close, then place a precise shot that takes out the central nervous system. Wild "chest" shots at a distance will kill goats. The end result just may not be desirable.
    Be safe and if you've scouted out the terrain and identified risky terrain by all means set up a safety line, bring a harness, cut brush, be prepared and know your routes. All of the above goats involved days of preparation and route finding.


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  13. #13
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Here's another "flat spot" goat. This one for Mrs. Bighorse


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  14. #14
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Bighorse is probably the most accomplished goat killer on the forum so take his advice seriously.

    But a couple of things...

    -Shooting goats from a boat isn't goat hunting and anyone who does cheapens the significance of goats.
    -Accessing goat country from a boat usually means a lot of nearly vertical country. I'd advise against it if there are other options.
    -Think of goat hunting as an extreme backpacking/mountaineering adventure with actual goat hunting as a diversion.
    -Get a map and study it. Find the up routes within your ability even if it means a longer walk in.
    -Top notch gear is a must--high end boots, bomb proof tent, etc., etc.
    -DO NOT head up the mountain with climbing gear you don't already know how to use!!!

    Goats are not a day trip, head-to-the-woods-after-work sort of animal. Goat country is serious business and requires a serious commitment. People have been seriously hurt and even killed on goat hunts. The culprit? Gravity.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Default Misty Fjords in early September

    This goat surely suited my tastes and is a beautiful mount in my man cave!! It was all the climbing I could ever have wanted. A 10" goat with shorter hair was fine by my standards.
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  16. #16
    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    Default Double billy

    Goat hunting is by far my favorite animal to hunt, their a challenge, the weather usually sucks, it's steep, dangerous, and a beautiful animal.

    Heres last novembers results. 7.5 year old billy on top, 3.5 on the bottom. 9 and 9.5"

    Hoytguy
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    Quality Counts @ Dahlberg's Taxidermy

  17. #17
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    I Love the double billy Jesse! That's a classic image from a bad***** hunter. Good stuff man!

  18. #18
    Member danmiotke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Although it's real nice to get a nice full hide on a goat later on in the season, weather can do in a hunt pretty easy then......it has for me. A taxidermist friend of mine tried to get a Nov goat for a life size mount for years and years and never did. I'll keep trying for a late goat as well, but this one looks pretty dang nice to me.... http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Tustumena-goat
    It took 4 days for that billy to make a mistake and leave the safety of his cliff



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  19. #19
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danmiotke View Post
    It took 4 days for that billy to make a mistake and leave the safety of his cliff



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    Yep....sometimes you just gotta wait em' out.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  20. #20
    Sponsor Hoytguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    I Love the double billy Jesse! That's a classic image from a bad***** hunter. Good stuff man!

    Thanks chris, still think one of these years we need to team up and do some damage to a couple big Billy's..

    Hoytguy
    Quality Counts @ Dahlberg's Taxidermy

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