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Thread: Downside to HUNTER shooting skills, and a Cure....MAYBE.

  1. #1

    Default Downside to HUNTER shooting skills, and a Cure....MAYBE.


    I have discovered a big void in my shooting skill'set. I bought my first rifle when I was nine y/o with money from my paper route. I have 60 years of hunter programming in my skill'set which has served me well.

    However, I have been haunted by the possible need that in the near future I could need the ability to engage multiple targets quickly. I foolishly figured that learning to do that would be easy. It has been very, very hard.

    A skilled hunter, even when making a quick shot, stays on the target to observe the effect of the shot, quickly assesses the result and either fires a follow-up shot or not, be he keeps his attention on the animal. There was a time, I remember well in Alaska when we could harvest five Caribou at a time. But, even then the hunter made sure the first animal was solidly down, before moving to a second Caribou. This deeply ingrained skill'set has complicated the transition to multiple target engagement training.

    After much effort and much failure, I dumb-lucked onto a cure that (at least) works for me. While the mental and muscle memory training still needs a lot of work, the procurement of a high quality Aimpoint optic has made the biggest difference in this effort.

    I think this red dot type optic has allowed my brain to grasp that this is a totally different event than hunting. I hope this makes some sense to the reader.

  2. #2
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    I think you have a valid point. The red dot optic also helps break you of tunnel vision that is natural from a traditional scope. If you are engaging multiple targets, the field of view of a traditional scope limits what you can see and in turn makes transitions difficult. Open optics with 1X magnifications allow you to scan quickly without dialing too much in on one target. The trade off is that you will lose some longer distance accuracy. Aimpoints have a 2 MOA dot, some others go as high as 8 MOA, but the smallest is usually 1 MOA. It's tough to get sub-moa accuracy with a dot that's 2 MOA, but that's not what the aimpoint and for that matter all red dot optics are intended for.

    My problem is kind of the opposite. I started shooting later in life. (always had guns around, never really bothered with them since we didn't really hunt as a family). So I never really learned scope shooting. I started on irons and red dots. Now I'm trying to teach myself how to shoot with a scope. It's been fun.

  3. #3
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    That's one of the things I love about the IER "Scout Scope" setup... with a little practice you can leave both eyes open and have a huge FOV.

    I've always wanted to try an Aimpoint on my Scout. Should be a nice setup.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    ... a high quality Aimpoint optic....
    That and being forced to shoot with both eyes open so you see what's going on "around" and beyond your sights. I was forced into the 2-eye business when I got into "action" pistol shooting with multiple targets. The transition to rifles was pretty easy after that, just so long as there was NO magnification in the rifle sights. The minute there's a difference between what I'm seeing in the sights and what's happening around it, my brain goes wonky and I start squinting or closing one eye. Results go straight south then.

  5. #5

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    Yes, and one thing that has helped me is keeping the objective lenses cap CLOSED. The red dot is visible but both eyes must be open to see the environment as nothing can be seen through the optic.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    That and being forced to shoot with both eyes open so you see what's going on "around" and beyond your sights. I was forced into the 2-eye business when I got into "action" pistol shooting with multiple targets. The transition to rifles was pretty easy after that, just so long as there was NO magnification in the rifle sights. The minute there's a difference between what I'm seeing in the sights and what's happening around it, my brain goes wonky and I start squinting or closing one eye. Results go straight south then.

  6. #6

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    Oooooh.....

    Good one. Thanks!

  7. #7
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    Hodgeman got the rite idea. You put a good scope on say, an M1A Scout rifle and you're going to clean house real quick like.

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