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Thread: Fly Rod

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    Default Fly Rod

    I have a 5 wt fly rod. Is this sufficient enough for trout on the various Mat-Su Valley rivers and streams? The rod is also 9' long.

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    It will be just right, especially with the low water little lead needed

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yellowstone View Post
    I have a 5 wt fly rod. Is this sufficient enough for trout on the various Mat-Su Valley rivers and streams? The rod is also 9' long.
    Sufficient enough, until you lock into that 25"+ trout. Then you'll be wishing it was a 6/7 wt.
    "The North wind is cold no matter what direction it's blowing"

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    GO for it an have a good trip enjot the outing SID

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    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    Sufficient enough, until you lock into that 25"+ trout. Then you'll be wishing it was a 6/7 wt.
    I've used 4 & 5 wt. on the Parks Highway streams and they can get the job done for most fish, but as DannerAK mentioned, when you hook into that 25+ inch trout all bets are off. Also, keep in mind that a smaller rod will take longer to bring a fish in compared to a larger rod. So, you will be playing a fish longer than is needed and adding undue stress and exhaustion. Just food for thought.
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    They will work but a 7 weight spey rod would be your best choice. Then when you get a big kenia bow or steelhead you don't have to play out the fish as long. Just my 2 cents

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    As with so many things, the answer is "it depends" (this is in response to the "best choice" comment). Like, it depends what kind of flies you'll be fishing - if you're going to be throwing big, heavy, articulated streamers you'll want a heavier rod. If you're going to be fishing #22 dry flies you'll certainly be able to cast them with an 8wt but unless you're a very proficient caster your presentation might leave something to be desired using a rod that heavy. Unless you're looking for an excuse to buy another rod (and really, who isn't?) I'd probably stick with the 5wt for the first outing, be prepared to move to a relatively heavy leader and tippet (have it in your kit), and be extremely sensitive to fish handling issues (don't stress the fish).
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    Sufficient enough, until you lock into that 25"+ trout. Then you'll be wishing it was a 6/7 wt.
    Or you you hook a salmon, especially foul hooked.

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    if you foul hook anything why not just pop it off, instead of trying to drag it in. Though popping a stinky pinky can be a royal pain, they generally just plane up when you point the rod at them. Nasty things lol.

    A 5 is fine for most of the valley streams. Though I'd prefer a fast 5. Personally a 6 or 7 would serve you better as an all around valley rod imho.

    all 5 wts are not created equal (not all similar weight rods are created equal, it doesn't just pertain to 5s).....I've had a 6 weight that cast like my 4 though it could handle big fish, it was a wet noodle until you put the bend in the last foot or so. So its a hard question to answer. about when choosing a stick.

    And as was mentioned how you fish will play as much into rod choice. Mlshore nailed it. are you trying to cast monster hair flies or are you fishing nymphs or midging dries...do you need a T400 line to get to fish or are you going all drylines. Things to think about. I prefer a 6wt when I'm done it has served me well. I jump up to my 7wt for fishing salmon, all but kings. The 7's a faster 7, were the 6 is a medium fast 6 wt (10'). I generally tell guys to hit a medium fast rod as an all arounder for a trout mid range rod, and a faster rod for a all around salmon stick. Too slow and casting big meaty stuff is a chore. yet too fast isn't the easiest to cast for most, and if you end up switching to finesse, well they're not so finesseful lol They can power through wind, and turn over big indicators so they do have a place, which is a bonus....you'll learn to fish the stick you have I'm sure, and come up with your own decision.

    I don't believe a spey rod will land a fish any faster than a similar one hander. It will however allow you cast some serious distance with ease. Yet I don't see the revelence to the OP's original question of valley streams on a spey. My 10 footer is too long most of the time. It is fun to spey cast a single hander in the valley however I wouldn't want to have to drag that telephone pole around all day in that jungle lol...my luck I'd break it! There are places and holes where I'm sure they shine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dieNqvrs View Post
    Or you you hook a salmon, especially foul hooked.
    I like an 8 wt for a little of everything, but a friend visiting from L48 broke mine on a kenai king while flipping fir reds, so I had to use my 5 wt all last week on the parks. Hooked and landed plenty of silvers pinks and even a couple dogs as well as trout and grayling, several very nice rainbows in the mid 20s and don't recall having any trouble save for places that were really swift water. I just didn't pull real hard and let them do the playing. Silvers were super fun drifting roe with a bobber! Most fun silver fishing I've ever experienced. I was running 10 lb test leader but only broke off a dog.



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    Quote Originally Posted by DannerAK View Post
    Sufficient enough, until you lock into that 25"+ trout. Then you'll be wishing it was a 6/7 wt.
    sound advice -
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    I like an 8 wt for a little of everything, but a friend visiting from L48 broke mine on a kenai king while flipping fir reds, so I had to use my 5 wt all last week on the parks. Hooked and landed plenty of silvers pinks and even a couple dogs as well as trout and grayling, several very nice rainbows in the mid 20s and don't recall having any trouble save for places that were really swift water. I just didn't pull real hard and let them do the playing. Silvers were super fun drifting roe with a bobber! Most fun silver fishing I've ever experienced. I was running 10 lb test leader but only broke off a dog.
    Awesome! I've been pushing the slip bobber and egg technique for the last few years. It's a very effective way to fish for silvers and kings and it's a kick in the pants.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yellowstone View Post
    I have a 5 wt fly rod. Is this sufficient enough for trout on the various Mat-Su Valley rivers and streams? The rod is also 9' long.
    The answer to your question is getting more complicated than you want it to. Will a 5 wt. work for trout? Yes. Is it the appropriate rod to use for trout on Valley streams? NO. For trout on most valley streams, an 8 wt. is overkill. A 6 or 7 wt. is the appropriate size for these streams. Between the 6 & 7 wt. , which is the more suitable rod? That depends on you, the rod, and which river you are fishing. A 7 wt. is more applicable if hucking big flesh and leeches and/or if fishing some of the larger rivers. If your fishing the smaller streams and just throwing nymphs, beads, fry, and other small patterns, a 6 wt. would be more appropriate.
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    I still say a 5 wt is great for those streams, and there is no reason a fish can't be landed quickly and effectively. I agree not all 5's are the same however. But give the guy a break, a 5 is just fine. A 7 is overkill for 99% of the fish on those rivers even in high water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    The answer to your question is getting more complicated than you want it to. Will a 5 wt. work for trout? Yes. Is it the appropriate rod to use for trout on Valley streams? NO. For trout on most valley streams, an 8 wt. is overkill. A 6 or 7 wt. is the appropriate size for these streams. Between the 6 & 7 wt. , which is the more suitable rod? That depends on you, the rod, and which river you are fishing. A 7 wt. is more applicable if hucking big flesh and leeches and/or if fishing some of the larger rivers. If your fishing the smaller streams and just throwing nymphs, beads, fry, and other small patterns, a 6 wt. would be more appropriate.
    Extremely sound advice.............a 5wt will work if you have nothing else, but your going to work it and the fish. A 6wt imho is the better option. Unless you stay on top of the fish and keep him on the reel....it will be rough.

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