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Thread: Multi-band radio & antenna for Alaska

  1. #1

    Default Multi-band radio & antenna for Alaska

    Anything unique or special about setting up an antenna for receiving multi-band radio in rural Alaska.....???

  2. #2
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    I'm a HAM radio operator and yes, there are endless ideas for good antennas.

    Here's a good place to start looking....

    http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Antennas/Receiving/

    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  3. #3

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    Well I went there and looked around, and it is all Greek to me (radio talk mumbo'jumbo). So allow me to start over. This would be for "Receiving" only, I don't know if that is a different antenna than transceiver antenna. Is there one antenna that will work for many wave lengths, or does the length of the antenna influence the wave length received.......???



    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I'm a HAM radio operator and yes, there are endless ideas for good antennas.

    http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Antennas/Receiving/

  4. #4
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    Simple. As long a piece of wire as you can string, as high as possible, with the end connected to the radio antenna input. Ground optional but might help.

    If you're living in a remote cabin, particularly if off-grid, there will be so little man-made noise that you should be able to hear anything.

    Your generator or inverter will probably make some radio noise though.

  5. #5

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    Should it be "L" shaped, or does it not matter if the antenna is perpendicular to the transmitter signal......???

  6. #6
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    Keep it straight and as parallel to the ground as you can. If you can get at least 35' high and 100' long the main lobes (areas of highest sensitivity) will be at an angle from the longitudinal axis of the antenna. About 45 degrees at 5 MHZ and decreasing as the frequency increases. At this height (or higher) you will also get better performance with low angle signals...ie: distant (DX) stations. This guy sums it up pretty well. What are you using for a receiver?

  7. #7

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    To gather information, in a post catastrophic event, such as earthquake, etc..

    Quote Originally Posted by AKC172 View Post
    What are you using for a receiver?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    To gather information, in a post catastrophic event, such as earthquake, etc..
    Understood. I was curious as to the make/model of your radio.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    To gather information, in a post catastrophic event, such as earthquake, etc..
    5167.5 kHz (dial frequency) is the Alaska ham radio emergency frequency for just such occurrences. You should be able to gather a lot of information by listening on that frequency. However, your best source would probably be one of the AM radio stations in the state.

    You will no doubt be using your radio for general listening 99-percent of the time, and (apparently) you won't be transmitting, so a long piece of wire will do the trick for you and will cover a wide range of frequencies.

    Forget all the technical mumbo-jumbo antenna theory you might come across. A wire close (within 50-feet or so) of the ground bears no relationship to an antenna in free space. Where the major lobes end up is determined by too many variables in a practical installation.

    VY0AW

  10. #10

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    I would have to assume that (For my information, wants) all AM/FM stations "MAY" not be able to transmit in some conditions, Such as EMP or X-Class solar flare. I want to buy some Radio receivers that would be cached with antenna wire. Most likely buried in appropriate size ammo cans in Slate Creek and Colorado Creek.

    Quote Originally Posted by NunavutPA-12 View Post
    However, your best source would probably be one of the AM radio stations in the state. VY0AW

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