Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: water logged foam

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    39

    Default water logged foam

    I have a 2007 extreme shallow 1875 xs. I pulled up the floor boards the other day because water would not drain out of the bow of the boat. The extrem shallows have floor boards from bow to stern. Anyways I stepped on the sprayed in form and water gushed up out of the foam. So I removed about 40 to 50 pounds of wet foam from my boat. This was just 1 section of foam about 30 inches long 12 inches wide and 6 inches tall. I am guessing if I were to remove all the wet foam there would be around 500 pounds of wet foam. I cleaned out the drain ports in the bottom of the boat and the water stated to drain out of the boat.I could see water running under the foam and the hull of the boat. I can see the purpose of the foam as a floatation aid and possibly as a means to reduce rock damage to the hull because the space between the bottom of the hull and the floor board is a solid foam, The foam would also reduce the amount water entering the boat in case of hull puncture. My question is this: Should I replace the the foam that I pulled out, leave the wet foam in the boat, or pull out all the wet foam I can and not replace the foam. Any other thoughts on what should be done with wet foam in a boat.
    Thanks
    Dave

  2. #2
    Member Rob B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska,
    Posts
    3,151

    Default

    Pull out all that foam and leave it out. It's a river boat and will truly benefit from it. Be sure to clean up the aluminum afterwards too.
    27' Wooldridge Super Sport Offshore Pilothouse PRIME TIME!
    Kodiak Custom Fishing Tackle Pro Staff
    Heavy Hitter Fishing Crew
    MMSI# 338232859

  3. #3

    Default

    I used pool noodles on my rebuild. Light and non absorbent..worked great for my application,but may not be practical for your boat. You can also buy spendy billets of the same material. Consider blue or pink rigid insulation board if it could be cut fit your cavities fairly well. It comes in several thicknesses and can be painted with cheap primer or house paint to further seal it. Then there's the 2 part foam you're dealing with now. I don't know what the grade the factory used, but if you use heavier 4 lbs per cu. ft. stuff, it is twice as dense as the 2 lb. that is often used. It will have more closed cells and will absorb water at a slower rate...but it will end up waterlogged, too. Amazing how much waterlogged stuff weighs. When I did the one pictured, the rotten foam, plywood and balsa core weighed almost as much as the whole boat did new. Lots of guys don't replace their foam, but if you knock a hole in the hull, you can take on a ton of water instantly.

  4. #4

    Default

    On our familys sportjet hewescraft, which has foam from bow to stern, it had some good performance brand new. After a few years the performance noticeably dropped off, and we were sure it was the stator and impellor. Had them replaced, a little bit of improvement. Then we pulled the floorboards to rewire and work on the fuel tank. Found out our foam was water logged and heavy as bricks. We removed it all, and wow did that make the difference. We just left it out, never felt the need to stick it back in. The pool noodle is a good idea, easy to remove and cheap to replace when they get all silty.

  5. #5
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    The foam they are using in boats is not a closed cell foam so it absorbs water.
    Replace with a closed cell foam. You will retain your flotation and not have to deal with it water logging again.
    Go see your local home insulation specialist and have them spray in some Walltite Eco spray foam insulation.
    It is a closed cell foam unlike the stuff in your boat now.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    39

    Default

    I did not remove any more foam from my boat over the weekend. On Sunday I replaced the foam that I pulled out with some white building foam I had left over from a home remodel job. My reasoning for this decision was since the foam was part of the manufactures build design if I removed the foam and put a hole in the boat my boat insurance may not cover the damage since I removed the foam that the manufacturer installed. I do not know for sure one way or the other about the insurance coverage but I do not want to take the chance. I will remove the foam and replace the foam before next year's boating season. Thanks for the info on the the close cell foam sounds like a good idea. I do know someone local here that does spray foam

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    I fully understand the logic that the manufacture know best and I have said it many times to explain why something was done. When it comes to putting foam in the bottom of a boat that adsorb water it make me wonder if they really know what there doing or they just don't care. There are other problems when foam get wet other than added weight. It can cause corrosion when wet, also spray on foam may have chemical that can cause corrosion. If you plan on keeping the boat for a long time at the end of each season remove the foam, clean, dry the aluminum and foam before inspecting for corrosion.

  8. #8

    Default

    I like the way Wooldridge does it in their foam flotation required boats. They install it above the floor in the sides. It does take up a bit of space, but keeps a owner from having this issue down the road.

    Tom

    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I fully understand the logic that the manufacture know best and I have said it many times to explain why something was done. When it comes to putting foam in the bottom of a boat that adsorb water it make me wonder if they really know what there doing or they just don't care. There are other problems when foam get wet other than added weight. It can cause corrosion when wet, also spray on foam may have chemical that can cause corrosion. If you plan on keeping the boat for a long time at the end of each season remove the foam, clean, dry the aluminum and foam before inspecting for corrosion.

  9. #9
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    here's what happens when soaked foam touches the aluminum





    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    here's what happens when soaked foam touches the aluminum




    Can't open your pics, Steve....

  11. #11
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    sorry about that guess copy and paste doesn't work ??
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  12. #12
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    couple more
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  13. #13

    Default

    Buddies Olympic 26 ft gas boat aluminum tank had a leak where foam pads anchored gas tank. Suspect corrosion. But had been out of the water in storage for 8 years.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    39

    Default

    wow that some interesting photos. Do you know what kind of foam was used in your boat Potbuilder. Looks like the wrong type of foam can cause a lot of damage. I will have to do some research before I refoam my boat. Any suggesting on what type of foam will not cause the damage that shows up in Potbuilder's photos. I did not see any evidence of corrosion in my boat but than I was not looking for that problem. This winter I will look closer at the hull of my boat. Happy fishing all.

  15. #15
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Some of the "higher tech" spray foam insulation that they are using in homes today are using something mixed in with it that they say is making a built in vapor barrier so you don't have to use plastic. This stuff that I've seen gives it a blue/blue green color to it. The old stuff was a brown/tan color. Hard to say if that vapor barrier chemical would cause corrosion to aluminum?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltadave1547 View Post
    I will have to do some research before I refoam my boat. Any suggesting on what type of foam will not cause the damage that shows up in Potbuilder's photos.
    That's a easy question, look for a foam that not does hold water, is not made of chemical that cause corrosion if wet or dry and keeps water from getting under the foam to cause oxygen corrosion or any of its byproduct that dissolve aluminum.

    Let me know what you find.

  17. #17
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    4,229

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deltadave1547 View Post
    wow that some interesting photos. Do you know what kind of foam was used in your boat Potbuilder. Looks like the wrong type of foam can cause a lot of damage. I will have to do some research before I refoam my boat. Any suggesting on what type of foam will not cause the damage that shows up in Potbuilder's photos. I did not see any evidence of corrosion in my boat but than I was not looking for that problem. This winter I will look closer at the hull of my boat. Happy fishing all.
    Not my boat, i like glass boats ! My friend surveyed boats for a living out in the bristol bay fishery, did 100's of boats and most boats where the foam was touching the metal had the problem to some degree. I don't know what kind of foam it is but i do know it was the kind that wasn't supposed to soak up water. No matter what they tell you after awhile they all soak up water. I know with aluminum fuel tanks they have been coating them with coal tar epoxy to somewhat insulated them from water and corrosion.
    The foam that will cause no damage is called "no foam"

    Alaska Shrimp Pots

    Rigid & Folding Shrimp & Crab Pots
    Electra Dyne Pot Haulers
    Ropes, Buoys, Bait
    alaskashrimppots.com
    akshrimppots@mtaonline.net
    907 775 1692

  18. #18
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,121

    Default

    In depth info and more pics on ''aluminum alloy boats'' forum regarding corrosion, pitting, flowering, etc....check out posts by Kevin Morin in Kenai.
    Aluminum needs exposure to air and oxidize to form its protective ''coating'' if you will. By spraying it with any sort of foam, it stays wet and pits or corrodes. Leaving your al. boat on a trailer that has wood bunks or worse yet, carpeted, will do the same thing. Pitting will occur where the boat rides on the bunk.
    Loose foam under the floor boards is a better choice such as the swiming noodles pictured above or better yet, nothing at all.
    If you have an al. boat with a treated plywood deck, usully wrapped in a rubber grey material, pull the floorboards and check it out. Where the floor is screwed to the stringers there will likely be pitting where the screw keeps the board tight against the al. stringers.

    Anyway, some good reading on the other forum if this stuff intrests you.
    I have dealt with it on 3 different al. boats by 3 builders. Keep it foam free and allow oxygen to the surface and it will last longer.
    Bk

  19. #19
    Member DanielApplin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    344

    Default

    First thing to do after buying any new river boat is to pull the crap out, and don't put any back in. Let the water drain out of the boat and keep the weight down. Won't affect insurance a bit.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    39

    Default

    I don't know if I should start another thread on this subject but here I go. I was reading my insurance policy, and the policy states boat must be seaworthy. Seaworthy is defined as: Means fit to withstand the foreseeable and expected condition of weather, wind, seas,and the rigors of normal and foreseeable use. Since the manufacturer of the extreme shallow put foam in the bottom of the boat for floatation or other reasons, removing the foam would probable in the eyes of the insurance company be considered not maintaining the boat in a seaworthy condition. This is a riverboat where rocks and other objects could do a lot of damage and sink the boat. With this said next year I will replace the foam.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •