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Thread: New Study by NOAA on some of the economic value of sport fishing

  1. #1
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    Default New Study by NOAA on some of the economic value of sport fishing

    http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories...s-economy.html

    Studies like this one - by a relatively dis-interested party - should help in determining the economic based allocation / value of our fisheries resources.

    Note that this was just bait and tackle retailers - there are of course many more businesses that are involved in sport fishing.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories...s-economy.html

    Studies like this one - by a relatively dis-interested party - should help in determining the economic based allocation / value of our fisheries resources.

    Note that this was just bait and tackle retailers - there are of course many more businesses that are involved in sport fishing.
    ...Or better yet reports like this one...

    http://www.hamiltonproject.org/files...olicybrief.pdf

    "Commercial harvesters at U.S. fisheries in 2012 directly generated $7.0 billion in economic activity, but the industryís significance extends well beyond fishing harbors. All told, the U.S. fishing industry contributed $89.4 billion to the U.S. economy in 2012 and accounted for 1.7 million jobs nationwide. The economic contribution of the fishing industry is split between commercial and recreational fishing, contributing $59.0 billion and $30.4 billion in 2012, respectively (NMFS 2014). As shown in figure 1, the economic contribution of the commercial fishing industry is far more than the value of landings (i.e., fish brought to shore), with substantial contributions by harvesters, wholesalers and distributors, retailers, importers, as well as processors and dealers. Similarly, recreational fishing drives economic activity not only through guided fishing trips, but also through the manufacture of boats and other fishing equipment."


    So not really sure what your point is, since as you know tvfinak, economic value is only one of many criteria used to determine allocations, especially in Alaska. As usual I get the idea you are trolling for a contentious discussion against commercial fishing, those horrible processors, comparisons to the oil industry, and so on. Just watch...

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    Looks like this study told us what we already know - sport and commercial fishing are valuable economic drivers for our state. Good thing there are plenty of fish for everyone!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithtb View Post
    Looks like this study told us what we already know - sport and commercial fishing are valuable economic drivers for our state. Good thing there are plenty of fish for everyone!!!
    Yup, lots of fish for everyone. That is why there is no retention of kings in the road accessible valley streams, which were a major contributor to the 3/4 billion dollars generated by sport fishing in the valley. But since there are plenty of fish for everyone, those whose fisheries are closed due to not enough fish are just clearly delusional.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Yup, lots of fish for everyone. That is why there is no retention of kings in the road accessible valley streams, which were a major contributor to the 3/4 billion dollars generated by sport fishing in the valley. But since there are plenty of fish for everyone, those whose fisheries are closed due to not enough fish are just clearly delusional.
    Are you just nuts? Small streams in the valley cannot support the population growth. These streams never could and were weekend only fisheries, just like the Anchor on the Peninsula. But more to the point smith did not say you got to pick the species and the location. He said fish and included the whole of Alaska. There is no shortage of fish for sport fisherman if they look for them. Willphish4food, your poor me comments just cannot stand the red faced test given this year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerka View Post
    Are you just nuts? Small streams in the valley cannot support the population growth. These streams never could and were weekend only fisheries, just like the Anchor on the Peninsula. But more to the point smith did not say you got to pick the species and the location. He said fish and included the whole of Alaska. There is no shortage of fish for sport fisherman if they look for them. Willphish4food, your poor me comments just cannot stand the red faced test given this year.
    Exactly the statement I'd expect from you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Yup, lots of fish for everyone. That is why there is no retention of kings in the road accessible valley streams, which were a major contributor to the 3/4 billion dollars generated by sport fishing in the valley. But since there are plenty of fish for everyone, those whose fisheries are closed due to not enough fish are just clearly delusional.
    Of course this is my fault, since I fish with a net over 100 miles away. Because we all know these fish can withstand unlimited urbanization, development, invasive species, and inriver harvest pressure, but none of them make it through the walls of death.

    Willphish, I said there are plenty of fish for everyone, and there are. If you want to be a successful fishermen I would suggest going to the fish rather than waiting for them to come to you. Take it from a setnetter - sometime the fish don't swim into your gear.

    Get out man - enjoy our state. Lots of opportunity if you look for it...

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    smithtb, sent you a PM

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Yup, lots of fish for everyone. That is why there is no retention of kings in the road accessible valley streams, which were a major contributor to the 3/4 billion dollars generated by sport fishing in the valley. But since there are plenty of fish for everyone, those whose fisheries are closed due to not enough fish are just clearly delusional.
    Caught three kings this weekend without even trying for kings. Yes, on rod and reel. I even got to keep them. Like Smith said, you got to go to the fish. They are out there.
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    Yup, lots of fish for everyone. That is why there is no retention of kings in the road accessible valley streams, which were a major contributor to the 3/4 billion dollars generated by sport fishing in the valley. But since there are plenty of fish for everyone, those whose fisheries are closed due to not enough fish are just clearly delusional.
    I've come to the conclusion that whenever a guy in South Central Alaska says there aren't enough fish for everyone, especially after a year like this, he is more than delusional. He has fish greed disease.

    The Valley's Little Su (road accessible) exceeded King escapements this year. Limits were liberalized to 5 Kings, fishing time and days increased, and bait was even allowed. The other site for King enumerations in the Valley, the Deshka, had the biggest return in almost 10 years, which also lead to increasing harvest limits. Sockeye were so thick on Fish Creek (road accessible) that dip netting was opened to scoop up the surplus. Coho returns are apparently strong enough already that limits have been increased on several popular Valley streams (road accessible).

    https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/EONR/...ADFG=region.R2

    You need more opportunity? I had two dozen Kings by March - the saltwater fishery was crazy good! That meant I didn't have to fish the Valley, Kenai, or Kasilof for Kings, which were easy pickings this year anyway. The Russian was hot, exceeding early run goals. We dip netted almost 50 sockeye in an hour. Folks were even dip netting Kings. I have 2 fresh Coho in the smoker as we speak - both hogs. Trout, Grayling, Shrimp, Rockfish, Halibut, etc. it's all phenomenal.

    Not enough fish for everyone?....willphis4food, that's silly.

  11. #11

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    http://radiokenai.net/krsa-classic-r...y-on-the-wall/

    Great statement from Mike Leonard of the American Sportfishing Association:

    "Leonard said recreational fishermen are motivated by the experience, not the amount of fish they actually take, and so the rules which govern commercial fisheries arenít appropriate for the 11 million recreational anglers which access the resource."

    Yes, and by the same token it is completely inappropriate to compare the opportunity, size or value of these very different fisheries by comparing harvest numbers. Why does our local Sportfishing association insist on constantly comparing only harvest numbers between sport and commercial fisheries in our state?

    That's a rhetorical question...

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithtb View Post
    http://radiokenai.net/krsa-classic-r...y-on-the-wall/

    Great statement from Mike Leonard of the American Sportfishing Association:

    "Leonard said recreational fishermen are motivated by the experience, not the amount of fish they actually take, and so the rules which govern commercial fisheries arenít appropriate for the 11 million recreational anglers which access the resource."

    Yes, and by the same token it is completely inappropriate to compare the opportunity, size or value of these very different fisheries by comparing harvest numbers. Why does our local Sportfishing association insist on constantly comparing only harvest numbers between sport and commercial fisheries in our state?

    That's a rhetorical question...
    What is so great about it? It is stupid all he is saying is a recreational angler is happy or motivated when they catch 3 sockeye with a rod & reel and not motivated by throwing out a gill net to catch 500. That's why the gear might be a single hook with one rod and a commercial gear regulation is a long net with a bunch of mesh. Tell me what is so great about the statement?

    You ask why local sport association constantly compares? it is a verse from the art of war. They rely on the difference in harvest big vs. small to motivate anglers who are not motivated by the amount of fish they catch to turn anglers against commercial fishing. Don't you get it? How do you think David beat Goliath? Example guide tells clients I got 12 sockeye for my people yesterday but yesterday the set netters caught 55,000. Now you have 4 anglers against set netting it is that simple.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kidfromgarcia View Post
    What is so great about it? It is stupid all he is saying is a recreational angler is happy or motivated when they catch 3 sockeye with a rod & reel and not motivated by throwing out a gill net to catch 500. That's why the gear might be a single hook with one rod and a commercial gear regulation is a long net with a bunch of mesh. Tell me what is so great about the statement?

    You ask why local sport association constantly compares? it is a verse from the art of war. They rely on the difference in harvest big vs. small to motivate anglers who are not motivated by the amount of fish they catch to turn anglers against commercial fishing. Don't you get it? How do you think David beat Goliath? Example guide tells clients I got 12 sockeye for my people yesterday but yesterday the set netters caught 55,000. Now you have 4 anglers against set netting it is that simple.
    His statement was great in that it gave me an opportunity to point out how dumb KRSA'S two legs bad four legs good type argument is. Thank you for the answer. You nailed it and yes, I get it.

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