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Thread: FIREWOOD....Is there a best way to process, least touching, most efficient...???

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    Default FIREWOOD....Is there a best way to process, least touching, most efficient...???

    From start to stacked.........what is the most efficient method of processing a tree to firewood. With the goal of only touching the wood the very least amount of times.

  2. #2
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
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    Hire someone else to do it?

    I the winter we cut our firewood as it is easier to get to and haul on snowmachine and sled.

    We cut down the trees, limb them, cut them into rounds, haul to cabin, split with a splitter and stack.

    Now that our boys are older I let them do most of the heavy lifting.


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    I'm with you there! It's so nice have sons who are grown up enough now to be of real help. I think the real secret of success when it comes to firewood gathering is to have it be quality family time. We cut in the summer, but I can see some definite advantages to cutting in the winter. I'm still festering from a large and very well coordinated yellow jacket attack during a wood cutting trip yesterday!
    Louis Knapp

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    Tractor with a front loader helps a lot. Cut, limb, cut to length and push into a pile and let it dry as need then split with a PTO splitter then dump the bucket load on the porch and haul in as needed. No tractor...have kids, mine left and the tractor is cheaper than another family.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Fell trees and buck logs to 8' length. Load logs onto Siglin sled and haul to front of wood shed. Offload into neat stack. Using 28-36" inch bar, mass cut entire stack in half, then halves into thirds (16 inch rounds). Split rounds and stack into shed.
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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I do similar to iofthetaiga with a couple of exceptions. I load the logs into my truck bed or skid out bundles of spruce poles with a 4 wheeler. I buck them as he described, but I dont see the point in stacking them. I toss them from the splitter, which is located directly in front of the woodshed, into the pile. Pile goes as high as the shed roof and gravity keeps the sides sloped to the angle of repose. Less work, same end result, IMO.

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    What I've done the past few years works for my weekend warrior cabin....prolly wouldn't work for a full-time place:

    - Engage #1 son's friend who is an equipment operator to walk a dozer in to dress the airstrip and to clear another acre or 5
    - Engage #1 son's other friend who is a saw boss on a wildland crew to assist with the clearing
    - Engage all of these "under 35" guys to buck, split, stack the wood that came down as part of the above efforts.

    Only thing I touch is the beer at the grocery store (this effort requires much beer) and my wallet. Happy tradeoff and it provides enough wood for a 2-3 year supply.

  8. #8
    Member cod's Avatar
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    The wife and I also do the winter cutting w snogo and cargo sled. Cut to stove length in the woods by me and loaded in cargo sled by wifey. No cutting chips in yard. The log supported by the snow keeps the cutting to length easier because the log is off the ground. Hauled to stacking area and split at stacking spot by the 2 of us.
    I try to bring up/in a few logs whenever I go in the house in the winter regardless whether we are almost out. The wife would rather wait till it's needed and make a special big haul or two to restock inside.
    Theres no question that two people working together makes wood gathering much much easier than one person doing it. We find it quite enjoyable even.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Member mit's Avatar
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    Burn fuel Oil.
    Tim

  10. #10

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    I fell about 20 to 30 and limb them on the top and part of side, but leave enough limbs on the bottom that the tree is off the ground. Flag them so I can find them in the snow. When the snow is right, I but a choker on 4 or 5 at a time and drag them off the mountain with the little Case 450B.

    In the early spring I buck them up, and leave the rounds as they fall. Early winter I split them with log splitter, and use the dozer to push them into a pile. Just leave the pile for near a year, then stack. Generally one or two years ahead, but getting old, and so plan to try to get 3 or 4 years ahead.

  11. #11

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    Cut stump off of windblown tree, Hook dozer to it, pull it to infront of the cabin. Cut lumber up and split it. Down at out friends we use his excavator and pick the log up and buck it short, then split it by hand. Also have a case 450b. If you want super easy splitting, get spruce and buck them in the fall when they are green and wet, then leave them under the snow all winter. The sugar snow drys them and the first few freezes splits them. Super easy splitting, old man taught me that trick.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    I agree with Cod. 2 is better. I tell the wife to fetch me a beer and then go get me some firewood!
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    Then I go get myself some ice for the bruise on my head!

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