Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: Total Noob needing some advise

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default Total Noob needing some advise

    I have always wanted to fly fish growing up in Georgia and spending my summers in the NC mountains visiting family, however no one I knew fly fished and we always considered it the rich man's way to trout fish. Now I have moved to a fishing mecca of sorts and would love to get into fly fishing (which I no longer consider a rich man's style of fishing).

    I will say that I was scared off when I went into Mountain View Sports to price check. At the moment I had a $200 budget and they had nothing in my price range. I had seen a kit at walmart for like $50 so I figured that a $200 budget should be fine. Get me into a mid range or good set up. I had no idea of the cost. Unfortunately I only had time to hit Mountain View Sports and didn't get to go to any of the other places in town in my five hours in Anchorage.

    What would you guys recommend that I look for? I will be fishing in the Dillingham area. Anything I can access from DLG with a boat or car. Char, trout, grayling, dollies, Kings would be my main targets.

    I know nothing, but would like to stay around my $200 budget. Is that doable? One rod? Maybe a couple of different rods and one reel? Please help.

  2. #2
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    In a van down by the river
    Posts
    2,039

    Default

    200 is doable but the reality of it is your gear may not be all that good unless you do your home work. I recommend getting a TFO fly rod in a 6 wt for trout and 8wt for salmon. a TFO rod will run you about 125-150 dollars depending on where you go and some places on the internet might find them cheaper. The rod is average at best but they do have a great no fault warranty. Then buy an Echo Ion fly reel, they run about 80 bucks. Best reel I have found for the buck. So with those two things, your in there or pretty close to 200. But you need fly line and backing and your reel spooled. Opinions about line will change with every new person you ask. I would go with a floating tip line and buy cheap line………..because if you don't take care of your line then you will beat it up after a few years. If you take care of your line then you can spend more. Any way getting the rod and the reel is the easy part…………its every thing you "think you need" latter that is a pain! LOL

    Good luck.

  3. #3

    Default

    Kenaibow Fan hit it on the head! $200 budget is very doable. I have been fly fishing for quite some time now and still don't have nice gear. Two reasons: I am hard on gear (line, rod and reel definitely take a beating) and two I don't want to spend top dollar on the Sage or Scott rods. An easy alternative to the TFO rod and Echo reel is to get the Redington Rod and reel package, it comes with backing and line. They seem to run from $150-180 for the package. I would get an 8 wt. They are great for salmon and large trout, but not that great for grayling.

  4. #4
    Member fishak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    452

    Default

    Head to Mossy's shop off of arctic and dimond and Mike will help you out with any questions you might have.
    hook, line, sinker, done.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I second the suggestion to stop by Mossy's. Echo, Redington and TFO all make decent lower-end stuff with a good reputation and warranty. Ideally, I'd get a 9-10 foot long 7-weight rod, a 7/8 weight reel with disc drag, and a WF7F line. If you're primarily going for small/medium trout or grayling, a 6-weight would work. If you're primarily going for salmon, an 8-weight would work, although even that will be too light for larger kings. Just make sure everything is designed for the same line weight. Some people will suggest that you can skimp on the reel because it does nothing more than hold the line, but I'd disagree. An aluminum reel with a disc drag is key.

    Echo outfit
    Redington outfits

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,593

    Default

    Since "stopping in at Mossy's" may be a little hard for you to do, I'd find someone local (a flyfishing guide might be ideal) and pick their brain a little. After that, check prices online at Cabela's or wherever and place an order. If you can find a local that can give you some mentoring - as far as other gear you'll need and some help to get you started on casting, you'll be ahead of the game. Trying to teach yourself to cast can be frustrating, to say the least. If you do get back into Anch, much of that could be taken care of by a visit to Mossy's.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    Since "stopping in at Mossy's" may be a little hard for you to do, I'd find someone local (a flyfishing guide might be ideal) and pick their brain a little. After that, check prices online at Cabela's or wherever and place an order. If you can find a local that can give you some mentoring - as far as other gear you'll need and some help to get you started on casting, you'll be ahead of the game. Trying to teach yourself to cast can be frustrating, to say the least. If you do get back into Anch, much of that could be taken care of by a visit to Mossy's.
    Thanks to everyone. I won't be coming back to anchorage until Christmas time I believe. So I'll look for some lical
    guys. I've had one guy suggest the cabela's set up. I've been hitting yard sales up as well but no luck there.

  8. #8
    Member chumstik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Shout out to Mike at Mossy's. I was in there a few weeks ago and a guy came from out of state that just wanted a rod to flip for reds. Instead of milking the guy for $400 (which the guy was totally prepared to fork over), Mike sent him over to Cabela's to get a budget rod and reel.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chumstik View Post
    Shout out to Mike at Mossy's. I was in there a few weeks ago and a guy came from out of state that just wanted a rod to flip for reds. Instead of milking the guy for $400 (which the guy was totally prepared to fork over), Mike sent him over to Cabela's to get a budget rod and reel.
    Now to call them. I think you just sold me on this company.

  10. #10
    Member ysr_racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Happily in So Cal.
    Posts
    583

    Default

    I've had good luck with the RLS-Fly-Combo from Cabelas, and it goes on sale all the time

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabel...bo/1555116.uts
    brad g.
    So Cal, USA
    Visit my Sporting Clays website
    http://www.ysr-racer.com

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kenaibow fan View Post
    200 is doable but the reality of it is your gear may not be all that good unless you do your home work. I recommend getting a TFO fly rod in a 6 wt for trout and 8wt for salmon. a TFO rod will run you about 125-150 dollars depending on where you go and some places on the internet might find them cheaper. The rod is average at best but they do have a great no fault warranty. Then buy an Echo Ion fly reel, they run about 80 bucks. Best reel I have found for the buck. So with those two things, your in there or pretty close to 200. But you need fly line and backing and your reel spooled. Opinions about line will change with every new person you ask. I would go with a floating tip line and buy cheap line………..because if you don't take care of your line then you will beat it up after a few years. If you take care of your line then you can spend more. Any way getting the rod and the reel is the easy part…………its every thing you "think you need" latter that is a pain! LOL

    Good luck.
    Ditto this. I have two temple forks and love them. My BVK goes with me everywhere.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    It's going to take two set ups if you want to fish for kings. It can still be done for about 200 but not with anything brand name. Brand name adds a whole lot of cost and a good warranty but in my opinion not a lot of fishability. You can pick up an Okuma 4/5/6 weight reel for about $35. You can get a 9/10/11 weight Okuma reel for about $60. Both have pretty good drags for their weight class. Rods are a whole different thing. You can get good usable rods in the $50 area especially if you watch the sales at Cabelas. Just this spring I bought a 4 piece 10weight for $48 and caught and released 30+ kings and probably 60 or more reds. It's fairly light for a 10 weight and handled kings up about 35lbs nicely. You are going to want a lighter rod for smaller fish as slinging line from a 10 weight ( even a real expensive one) all day catching 12" trout will take a lot of the fun away. A 5 or 6 weight will handle everything else and good enough rods can be bought at Wal MArt and such for $30/$50. Don't get a kit as they are usually very poor handling rods. Picking a rod is such an individual thing no one can really tell you what you will like. Rods not only come in different weights but also different actions. Different actions fish a lot different. People that like fast rods will probably hate a slow rod and vice-versa. As a beginner, you won't know what you like until you have gained some experience and tried some different action rods. I'm perfectly happy with a $50 rod if it is light, thin and fast action. I would not like a $600 rod with a slow action no matter whose name is on it. You really need to find someone local to you that can let you try a couple different rods before you slap down good money for something you may hate. I would go for the light weight rod first with an Okuma 4/5/6 reel. Pick an inexpensive rod of the rack at Wal Mart or such in either end of fast or slow action and see how you like it. Try another rod on the other end of action then you will have a good idea of what you like. Then get a king rod and reel.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yukon Cornelius View Post
    I have always wanted to fly fish growing up in Georgia and spending my summers in the NC mountains visiting family, however no one I knew fly fished and we always considered it the rich man's way to trout fish. Now I have moved to a fishing mecca of sorts and would love to get into fly fishing (which I no longer consider a rich man's style of fishing).

    I will say that I was scared off when I went into Mountain View Sports to price check. At the moment I had a $200 budget and they had nothing in my price range. I had seen a kit at walmart for like $50 so I figured that a $200 budget should be fine. Get me into a mid range or good set up. I had no idea of the cost. Unfortunately I only had time to hit Mountain View Sports and didn't get to go to any of the other places in town in my five hours in Anchorage.

    What would you guys recommend that I look for? I will be fishing in the Dillingham area. Anything I can access from DLG with a boat or car. Char, trout, grayling, dollies, Kings would be my main targets.

    I know nothing, but would like to stay around my $200 budget. Is that doable? One rod? Maybe a couple of different rods and one reel? Please help.
    Let me dig around, I had a couple pflugers laying around in 4/5 weight. If I can dig them up you can have one.

  14. #14

    Default

    rod reel and line alone even on budget rods of any quality will run you 200 bucks. BUT!!! That doesn't typically include backing, leaders, tippet, flies, indicators, beads, hooks, fly boxes, nets, pack glasses, floatant, split shot.... to name a few. Be prepared even on cheap flies to spend a small fortune! fly tying reduces the costs in the long run, the initial start up is by no means cheap! There are other tools and gizmos, these are just the basic stuff you'll need/want. If you end up like the rest of us, plan on buying rubber maids and assorted smaller containers for storing said gizmos shingdings to stay somewhat organized.

    These are just often overlooked things that you WILL buy, a lot of it up front! You CAN do it cheap but buying everything brand new wont get you their... If someone said Hey I just want to fish grayling, I'd tell them they can easily do it for under 2 bills.

    case in point, the low end fly lines are low end for a reason! A ok rod is pretty good with a good line. A high end rod with a junk line is junk!

    You can get by cheaper on leaders by tying your own....for salmon run straight mono and to heck with tapered leaders all together!

    I would also back the 6wt for trout and 8wt for salmon...however if you plan on flipping for reds I wouldn't do it with an 8wt. Not impossible by any means...a 9 or 10 is mo betta gooda!

    NO shop can get you under that, its not going to happen! throw a sling/fanny pack/vest in for another 50-100 bucks and you've already broke your budget with a rod with no backing, no flies...nothing to show for it. ThIS is why these shops make a killing! If you're a quick fly tyer, you'll know what I'm referring too. If not, do yourself a favor and go into the shops with a list, and buy NOTHING outside of that list. 50 bucks turns into 200 real quick!

  15. #15
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,368

    Default

    As you can see, everyone has their own opinion of what is best. From what I know of the Dillingham area, the trout, dollies and char are all of a caliber that will tax the drag system of your reel. Fortunately there are reels on the market with good drags for under $100. If you're set on a $200 budget the Redington combos are a good choice, as you get the fly line and backing free.

    The things to consider in your rod: Number one- you are fishing in Alaska. The Bristol Bay region. To many anglers around the world, The Holy Grail of wild, trophy rainbow trout.

    So think of the size of fish. Any literature you read about fly fishing for trout, geared toward any place in the world other than Alaska, is talking about trout that rarely exceed 16". You might go a day or two without finding any trout that small! I've guided numerous lower 48ers that have told me the smallest fish of the day was the biggest they'd catch in a year, and sometimes in a lifetime. So go too light with your rod, and fish recovery if the fish is to be released drops. Fish become too exhausted to recover well. Also, more fish are lost the longer it takes to fight them. The rod won't have the power to turn a big fish away from logs, rocks, corners, etc. Ever watched "A River Runs through It?" The rapids scene will happen on a whole lot of fish if your rod is too light. Go too heavy, and you can just yard the fish in, taking the fun factor way down. The beauty of fly fishing is that you can put very light flies on very heavy rods and still fish them and catch small fish on them.

    Next, think about size/weight/bulk (air resistance) of flies, and weather conditions. If there is a lot of wind where you fish, go with a heavier rod option. If you're slinging weights or big bulky Alaska trout or salmon patterns, go with the heavier. If I were fishing out of Dillingham I'd be using a bead, splitshot and strike indicator, I'd have some mouse patterns for topwater, and a bunch of sculpin type patterns. A fast action, 10' 6 weight rod will handle any of these well. If I hook a 26" or better trout in heavy water, though, I'd wish I had a 7 or 8 weight instead.

    There are a ton of 6 and 8 weight rod options out there, and not as many 7 weights. I've found, though, that a 7 weight fits my style of fishing, and the fish I'm targeting, perfectly, if its the right 7 weight. I still do most of my fishing with a 6 weight, as I only own 1 7 weight and it goes down for repairs sometimes. I use a 10' fast action rod.

    If you're going to be fishing mainly on the grayling end of the spectrum, and not much at all with silvers and chums, I'd go a 6 weight rod. I don't recommend a 5 weight, because it is sorely lacking on 24-30" rainbows, and doesn't have the muscle to punch a big fly into the wind. Even if you were an expert fly fisherman, I wouldn't recommend a 5 weight for that neck o the woods, except for specifically targeting grayling. You want a rod that will handle the biggest fish you hook, when that event happens. If you're fishing on bigger water, and targeting trout/dollies around spawning salmon, I'd consider a 7 or 8 weight. It will get the big flies out there with less effort, and bring in big fish more easily. A fast action 8 weight can't handle very light leader, though. You'll break fish off on the hookset more often, as the rod doesn't cushion the leader like a lighter rod will. I don't fish leader lighter than 8# with my 8, and generally stick to 12# fluorocarbon.

  16. #16

    Default

    FWIW, my first setup was a Cabelas 4 piece, 8 weight combo which has served me well over the years.
    "Happiness is a warm gun - bang bang, shoot shoot!"
    -Lennon/McCartney

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Two Rivers, AK
    Posts
    746

    Default

    I'd echo the recommendation for a Redington combo - those tend to be nice rods at good prices, and Redington stands behind their products, and willphish4food gave excellent advice. I would not recommend a fast action rod for someone who hasn't cast a fly line before, though - it'll be a lot harder for you to feel the rod load and it will be more difficult to develop a good cast.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dvarmit View Post
    Let me dig around, I had a couple pflugers laying around in 4/5 weight. If I can dig them up you can have one.
    That'd be awesome!!

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    rod reel and line alone even on budget rods of any quality will run you 200 bucks. BUT!!! That doesn't typically include backing, leaders, tippet, flies, indicators, beads, hooks, fly boxes, nets, pack glasses, floatant, split shot.... to name a few. Be prepared even on cheap flies to spend a small fortune! fly tying reduces the costs in the long run, the initial start up is by no means cheap! There are other tools and gizmos, these are just the basic stuff you'll need/want. If you end up like the rest of us, plan on buying rubber maids and assorted smaller containers for storing said gizmos shingdings to stay somewhat organized.

    These are just often overlooked things that you WILL buy, a lot of it up front! You CAN do it cheap but buying everything brand new wont get you their... If someone said Hey I just want to fish grayling, I'd tell them they can easily do it for under 2 bills.

    case in point, the low end fly lines are low end for a reason! A ok rod is pretty good with a good line. A high end rod with a junk line is junk!

    You can get by cheaper on leaders by tying your own....for salmon run straight mono and to heck with tapered leaders all together!

    I would also back the 6wt for trout and 8wt for salmon...however if you plan on flipping for reds I wouldn't do it with an 8wt. Not impossible by any means...a 9 or 10 is mo betta gooda!

    NO shop can get you under that, its not going to happen! throw a sling/fanny pack/vest in for another 50-100 bucks and you've already broke your budget with a rod with no backing, no flies...nothing to show for it. ThIS is why these shops make a killing! If you're a quick fly tyer, you'll know what I'm referring too. If not, do yourself a favor and go into the shops with a list, and buy NOTHING outside of that list. 50 bucks turns into 200 real quick!
    Thanks for this advise. I like the list idea. Smart.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    As you can see, everyone has their own opinion of what is best. From what I know of the Dillingham area, the trout, dollies and char are all of a caliber that will tax the drag system of your reel. Fortunately there are reels on the market with good drags for under $100. If you're set on a $200 budget the Redington combos are a good choice, as you get the fly line and backing free.

    The things to consider in your rod: Number one- you are fishing in Alaska. The Bristol Bay region. To many anglers around the world, The Holy Grail of wild, trophy rainbow trout.

    So think of the size of fish. Any literature you read about fly fishing for trout, geared toward any place in the world other than Alaska, is talking about trout that rarely exceed 16". You might go a day or two without finding any trout that small! I've guided numerous lower 48ers that have told me the smallest fish of the day was the biggest they'd catch in a year, and sometimes in a lifetime. So go too light with your rod, and fish recovery if the fish is to be released drops. Fish become too exhausted to recover well. Also, more fish are lost the longer it takes to fight them. The rod won't have the power to turn a big fish away from logs, rocks, corners, etc. Ever watched "A River Runs through It?" The rapids scene will happen on a whole lot of fish if your rod is too light. Go too heavy, and you can just yard the fish in, taking the fun factor way down. The beauty of fly fishing is that you can put very light flies on very heavy rods and still fish them and catch small fish on them.

    Next, think about size/weight/bulk (air resistance) of flies, and weather conditions. If there is a lot of wind where you fish, go with a heavier rod option. If you're slinging weights or big bulky Alaska trout or salmon patterns, go with the heavier. If I were fishing out of Dillingham I'd be using a bead, splitshot and strike indicator, I'd have some mouse patterns for topwater, and a bunch of sculpin type patterns. A fast action, 10' 6 weight rod will handle any of these well. If I hook a 26" or better trout in heavy water, though, I'd wish I had a 7 or 8 weight instead.

    There are a ton of 6 and 8 weight rod options out there, and not as many 7 weights. I've found, though, that a 7 weight fits my style of fishing, and the fish I'm targeting, perfectly, if its the right 7 weight. I still do most of my fishing with a 6 weight, as I only own 1 7 weight and it goes down for repairs sometimes. I use a 10' fast action rod.

    If you're going to be fishing mainly on the grayling end of the spectrum, and not much at all with silvers and chums, I'd go a 6 weight rod. I don't recommend a 5 weight, because it is sorely lacking on 24-30" rainbows, and doesn't have the muscle to punch a big fly into the wind. Even if you were an expert fly fisherman, I wouldn't recommend a 5 weight for that neck o the woods, except for specifically targeting grayling. You want a rod that will handle the biggest fish you hook, when that event happens. If you're fishing on bigger water, and targeting trout/dollies around spawning salmon, I'd consider a 7 or 8 weight. It will get the big flies out there with less effort, and bring in big fish more easily. A fast action 8 weight can't handle very light leader, though. You'll break fish off on the hookset more often, as the rod doesn't cushion the leader like a lighter rod will. I don't fish leader lighter than 8# with my 8, and generally stick to 12# fluorocarbon.
    Thank You for this. Lots to think about. I am going to talk with some local guys (one of my co-workers is interested in helping me out). I took the advise above of seeking someone local, and I did.
    Right now I am finishing a class up online which is eating up all my free time.
    If I had to choose one fish to target I would say Rainbows, but not sure what fish would be a late fall type to focus on. Right now I am limited to the Wood River and the Lake. I might be able to get up the Eluguwok a little, but Snake Lake and Aliknikek (sp) would be the two lakes.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •