Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: Freighters - Taiga Creek vs Scott Hudson Bay

  1. #1

    Default Freighters - Taiga Creek vs Scott Hudson Bay

    I am wanting to get into a freighting canoe. At least at this time I have narrowed it down to the Yukon freighter Taiga Creek and the Scott Hudson Bay.

    I understand that I can get the SHB shipped to Alaska. For folks who have done that, how much did it cost to ship to Alaska?

    The freighters mentioned are both rated aproximately the same in capacity but yet the TC is 3 feet shorter. I am assuming the shorter TC makes up the difference by having a wider stern waterline.

    Does anyone know the stern width of the TC?

    Assuming the TC is wider in the stern, will that allow the TC to theoretically be able to go through shallower water while under full power by keeping the stern from "squatting" as much?

    Will the UHMW armored bottom of the TC enable noticeably easier dragging of canoe across shallow gravel bottomed waterways?
    These are a few of the questions I have so far.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    I have been an HBC owner since 2001. My boat is still going strong. To stiffen the HBC it has keels and keelsons. This makes for a very strong set up but they get chewed up quite a bit as they concentrate all the friction. The gel-coat is tough but abrades and need to be re-done every year. They make dragging a bit harder as they can dig in. The Taiga creek would likely be a better dragger even without the UHMW bottom as you would have more surface on the river bottom with less of a pressure point. With UHMW it isn't going to be a contest. Mr. Manzo uses better materials to create hull stiffness and hasn't needed to keel up! I suppose you could put strips on the HBC if you wanted to drill holes in your new boat.

    Squatting has a fair bit to do with engine set up but more surface at the back wouldn't hurt. My own boat has about 95% of the wear on the front and very little at the back so squatting hasn't been much of an issue. I sport a 14HP Copperhead and have got up some pretty sketchy water. One thing to keep in mind is that the Canadian dollar is set to fall to 70 cents or so. This might make an HBC a bit of a deal. If cost isn't an option Michael designed his Taiga to work from the outset with a surface drive and it's no doubt the better boat.

    Capacity is a mysterious subject. Many companies and individuals use different ways of estimating. Both boats would likely be able to haul out two moose and gear. I have never had more than 1 moose in mine, but figure it would have handled another one, but why be greedy?


    Idea of stiffness and handling at 20 seconds on this video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2QJNZZaZgQ

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for your answer. I've seen that video before and am definitely impressed. I'm the fella that has recently commented on many of your boating / hunting videos. Doing my home work by watching all the videos I can find and searching all forum posts from multiple forums. Thanks again. Hopefully more folks like you with personal experience will chime in as well.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    I hope so too. The new Alaskan Canoes look very interesting. I can't imagine them not being a joy to use! Like to hear more about them.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    I sport a 14HP Copperhead and have got up some pretty sketchy water......... I have never had more than 1 moose in mine, but figure it would have handled another one, but why be greedy?
    Do you have a good idea of how shallow of water you can motor through with you and the kids and camping gear but no moose? How shallow of water when fully loaded WITH one large moose.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,762

    Default

    as long as the canoe floats you can make head way speed, when the water gets shallower the slower you go [ less damage to all equipment ]
    motor an canoe I think, canoe from hitting the bottom of stream , an the motor from grinding on the the bottom also
    the deeper the water the faster you can go, that goes for the long & short tail motors no water pump ,
    SID

  7. #7
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    One thing to keep in mind is that the Canadian dollar is set to fall to 70 cents or so. This might make an HBC a bit of a deal. If cost isn't an option Michael designed his Taiga to work from the outset with a surface drive and it's no doubt the better boat.

    Capacity is a mysterious subject.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2QJNZZaZgQ
    Yes sir, quite the hard economic times. We share a lot of the same woes here in AK. With Canada's petro-dollar, and Alaska's petro-budget, we are both in the same boat, stumbling to find a paddle.

    Oil prices drop.....so does the Canadian peto-dollar's worth. Oil prices drop, so does the funding to our state. Very hurtful times for us petro-based economies. They're laying off dozens of faculty from our university of Alaska Fairbanks. I really feel for the families who will loose their income.

    Yes, capacity is a mysterious subject.

    It has even stooped me a time or two. One thing I didn't realize, was that all that marine grade foam core that I used down low in the floor, and in the transom, provided a physics lesson that i never expected. It kinda goes like this: ever try to submerge two surf boards under water by yourself? That's the amount of foam core in the bottom of these darned boats.

    I was only using it for it's closed cell, anti water properties as a strengthener that isn't prone to rot. I had no idea that I would gain over 500 lbs of extra buoyancy potential that is solidly glassed down low. Now, there is no need for flotation chambers.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mountain joe View Post
    Thanks for your answer. I've seen that video before and am definitely impressed. I'm the fella that has recently commented on many of your boating / hunting videos. Doing my home work by watching all the videos I can find and searching all forum posts from multiple forums. Thanks again. Hopefully more folks like you with personal experience will chime in as well.

    I should know but I don't. Never really measured it but when I get out to drag I would guess I am in 6-8" of water.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you everybody for your responses. I have lived in Alaska for almost 50 years and have frequently been on rivers here in different watercraft quite a few times. I used to do some river trips in my coleman square stern with a 7.5 horse sears outboard but that was many many years ago. My friend and I successfully hunted from his jet boat last year and we will probably be using his Grumman freighter canoe this year due to low water levels. This recent river hunting again has given me the "bug" to get set up myself with the proper water craft/motor combo and I have narrowed it down to between these two watercraft listed above. I really appreciate what help has been given so far and look forward to any additional info anyone may feel free to add.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    Mountain Joe.... This last week I found out that the Beaver aircraft, beats the surface drive for entering the back-country. Even put the 405 Winchester to work. Couldn't make you shower work as I didn't seem to have the time to hike up to get a spruce pole but we swam in the crystal clear lake. Great trip but a bit pricier than gas for the Freighter. PS, Woodleigh 300 grain bullets don't expand violently at 220 yards when started off at 2300fps but still kill very well.




    Thanks again, and good luck with your quest.

  11. #11

    Default

    Congratulations on your harvest. Looks like a nice one. We would have been heading out for caribou within a week here but the weather is still way too hot. The caribou will most likely still be up high on the ridges and not down in the river valleys yet. It would be nice for me to have had my canoe for this season's hunting but I won't be getting it yet. I did get a quote from "Kanoe People" in Whitehorse for a Scott Hudson and it is a reasonable price after the exchange rate. After adding up all the costs though it would cost me almost the same as the "Taiga Creek Yukon Freighter". So I plan on going with the "Taiga Creek". I seen that you have out a new video of your hunt and I am anxious to see it but will have to wait until I'm back home. Had to come into town get my vehicle repaired. Glad you had a successful hunt. Good healthy eating for the family.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    I have loved my Hudson Bay but that new Taiga Creek looks hard to beat! Love the idea of UHMW armor and more flat surface area is better as is using epoxy rather than poly resin. The Canoe-Surface Drive concept has been fascinating. It's not a fast system but it will get you places under control without burning so much gas, and making so much noise. Pretty good fit for an old woodsman. Tomorrow is meat cutting day. It will be a long one!

  13. #13
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction
    Posts
    4,078

    Default

    Wow, Greg that is awesome you harvested your caribou with an 1895 winchester! Is that not the ultimate canoe gun? hunting in style my friend, hunting in style.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Wow, Greg that is awesome you harvested your caribou with an 1895 winchester! Is that not the ultimate canoe gun? hunting in style my friend, hunting in style.
    Michael, as you could probably tell by my snappy attire, style is important to me! You might not notice but in the picture below I was wearing my $9.00 Canadian Tire cheap imitation Crocs. I had done half of the meat processing before I even noticed!

    I carried the 1895 in camp as a bear gun. I carried a much lighter 325 WSM up the hills (or my daughter did for me when I got tired). I practiced with it up to 440 yards and got the ballistic turrets set and tweaked my loads for sub-MOA accuracy. The 405 Winchester I never touch. I found a load with RL7 that hits 2300fps and shoots Hornady FN, Spires and the Woodleigh to the same point and all into 2" or so with the peep sight, the Woodleighs maybe a bit more and the zero never changes. I love that in a gun. I did glass bed the forend and rear stock when I first got it. Maybe that has helped as it is the most stable rifle I own.

    After a long hike up to the Alpine I took a rest day and after cooking and talking with the kids I went up to my spotting hill to look around and there 220 yards away was a big caribou on the side of the hill. The Alders were high and the best I could do was kneel and take a shot with the bear defense Woodleighs. I don't think they expanded but he couldn't move more than 20 yards or so with a hole through his chest, allowing me to close to 75 yards where I put him down for keeps. That bullet expanded. I use the 300 Hornady Spire for most shooting, they will expand out to longer range but can be a bit soft at closer ranges. I see you picked up a 95 and have re-chambered to a big wildcat. Really nice rifle. Like you said, I feel like I got some extra style points and it makes a great hunt even better!

    Video if interested: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgE_V7KrDIw

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Delta Jct, Alaska
    Posts
    992

    Default

    That bull is looking good for this early......good job!.....and great experience for the kids.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    I had a hard time getting the backstraps as they were covered in 3" of fat! Incredible condition.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by North61 View Post
    I had a hard time getting the backstraps as they were covered in 3" of fat! Incredible condition.
    That would be excellent to render that fat out into tallow. Some folks believe that the animal fats are much better for a person to consume (IE frying, cooking) than the vegetable fats. They are also useful as a leather preservative. I combine my Caribou tallow with birch bark oil as well as neets foot oil (natural derived oil from animal feet) to use as my leather boot and glove preservative.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    new hampshire
    Posts
    236

    Default

    Enjoyed the Video...thanks for sharing North 61

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    429

    Default

    my pleasure

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    new hampshire
    Posts
    236

    Default

    North 61..... I see in your video ..you had a bear fence. What kind was it and have you ever had a bear come up on you while in the tent? They must have a good amount of ZAP !!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •