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Thread: Bristol Bay Sockeye 50 cents/lb

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    Default Bristol Bay Sockeye 50 cents/lb

    What are they going for in CI?



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    About $1.50/lb bulk price. Bummer for BB. Processors are likely overloaded.

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    Last years boom left a lot in the freezers.

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    http://www.adn.com/article/20150726/...-alaska-salmon

    The article days UCI reds going for $4.50 to $5 per pound. May be dependent on the market.

  5. #5

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    It's worth what you can get. Openers are often 12 hours long - which means 14hrs of work. Selling fish is a time-sensitive endeavor. The processor will buy them all by the tote load for $1.50/lb. Should a tired fisherman decided to direct market fish, it has to be worth their while. I figure there is a bulk discount for processors, and direct market fish should be worth AT LEAST $1.00/lb more than that, but there are plenty of direct market fishermen willing to sell fish for less - likely around the $2 benchmark which equates to the cost of dipping them.

    Thanks for the link to the article. Interesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithtb View Post
    It's worth what you can get. Openers are often 12 hours long - which means 14hrs of work. Selling fish is a time-sensitive endeavor. The processor will buy them all by the tote load for $1.50/lb. Should a tired fisherman decided to direct market fish, it has to be worth their while. I figure there is a bulk discount for processors, and direct market fish should be worth AT LEAST $1.00/lb more than that, but there are plenty of direct market fishermen willing to sell fish for less - likely around the $2 benchmark which equates to the cost of dipping them.

    Thanks for the link to the article. Interesting.
    What data or other reasoning did tou use to supports your statement that $2.00 per pound equates to what it costs to dip net them?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Questairtoo View Post
    What data or other reasoning did tou use to supports your statement that $2.00 per pound equates to what it costs to dip net them?
    He probably read the referenced article, where that statement was made.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Questairtoo View Post
    What data or other reasoning did tou use to supports your statement that $2.00 per pound equates to what it costs to dip net them?
    Yeah the $2 per pound quote might be accurate for some, but I know the reds I dip cost WAAAAAYYYYY less than $2 a pound. Last week, I had 8 different families dipnet with me on my boat (including my family). We spent $80 in fuel over 5 days and $25 in boat launch fees. Besides the cost of food and drinks we had on the river (which we would have eaten whether we were dipnetting or not), we spent $105 in expenses. With 290 fish dipped, that equates to $.36 per fish. At an average weight of 5 pounds, that puts us at about 7 cents per pound whole weight. That's a far stretch from $2.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    Yeah the $2 per pound quote might be accurate for some, but I know the reds I dip cost WAAAAAYYYYY less than $2 a pound. Last week, I had 8 different families dipnet with me on my boat (including my family). We spent $80 in fuel over 5 days and $25 in boat launch fees. Besides the cost of food and drinks we had on the river (which we would have eaten whether we were dipnetting or not), we spent $105 in expenses. With 290 fish dipped, that equates to $.36 per fish. At an average weight of 5 pounds, that puts us at about 7 cents per pound whole weight. That's a far stretch from $2.
    Not debating the cost as to me it is somewhat meaningless. People have fun and the cost depends on how one looks at the economics of the fishery. So in some studies the cost of the boat, truck, maintenance, dip nets, food, launch fees, and mileage to get here from Anchorage would count. The IRS uses around 50 cents a mile. So 300 miles round trip from Anchorage would be 150 dollars right off the bat. So it is hard to put a cost on this activity and really does it matter? To a dip net family the experience is worth a lot. To a set net family fishing it is the same. Things that cannot be measured is the real value of the fisheries.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerka View Post
    Not debating the cost as to me it is somewhat meaningless. People have fun and the cost depends on how one looks at the economics of the fishery. So in some studies the cost of the boat, truck, maintenance, dip nets, food, launch fees, and mileage to get here from Anchorage would count. The IRS uses around 50 cents a mile. So 300 miles round trip from Anchorage would be 150 dollars right off the bat. So it is hard to put a cost on this activity and really does it matter? To a dip net family the experience is worth a lot. To a set net family fishing it is the same. Things that cannot be measured is the real value of the fisheries.
    Yeah nerka, I was referring to MY cost. I live on ciechanski road. So without involving the IRS (like how did the IRS come up in this discussion?), I do have boat maintenance costs. The boat and truck are long paid for, and the dipnetting is a mere fraction of the time the boat is used. Bringing in the oil change every 50 hours and considering I ran the 15 year old Honda 4 stroke for 20 hours, that's another $12-15 to include in my costs. The price of my reds are going up!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    Yeah nerka, I was referring to MY cost. I live on ciechanski road. So without involving the IRS (like how did the IRS come up in this discussion?), I do have boat maintenance costs. The boat and truck are long paid for, and the dipnetting is a mere fraction of the time the boat is used. Bringing in the oil change every 50 hours and considering I ran the 15 year old Honda 4 stroke for 20 hours, that's another $12-15 to include in my costs. The price of my reds are going up!
    I was not questioning your costs. Just that cost comparisons are very subjective and depend on what is included. Too many times I have seen economic claims that are built on a whole host of assumptions to inflate the value of something or decrease it based on the outcome desired.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerka View Post
    I was not questioning your costs. Just that cost comparisons are very subjective and depend on what is included. Too many times I have seen economic claims that are built on a whole host of assumptions to inflate the value of something or decrease it based on the outcome desired.
    I agree with that. I had read that article days ago and found the estimate in there to be very general and for the most part, BS. It's $10 a pound for some people who get few fish and almost free for others. To come up with an average is very misleading.
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    Was simply trying to answer a question about price. It's surprising how affordable fresh salmon is in these parts. I think it is undervalued, especially compared to halibut - which I like - but comon, it's not salmon.

    I live near a local processor. I could travel a distance and catch for sport or personal use much of the seafood they sell. Sometimes I do, and I value that opportunity. Other times I find it easier to stop on my way home from work and pay the man.

    I don't know what it costs on average to dipnet (I built my dipnet a long time ago and can walk to the river) - but I would have guessed $1-$3 probably - I think it's higher than $2 for people who travel far or take time off and treat it like a vacation. Which I'm totally cool with. Just pick up your poop, people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    Yeah the $2 per pound quote might be accurate for some, but I know the reds I dip cost WAAAAAYYYYY less than $2 a pound. Last week, I had 8 different families dipnet with me on my boat (including my family). We spent $80 in fuel over 5 days and $25 in boat launch fees. Besides the cost of food and drinks we had on the river (which we would have eaten whether we were dipnetting or not), we spent $105 in expenses. With 290 fish dipped, that equates to $.36 per fish. At an average weight of 5 pounds, that puts us at about 7 cents per pound whole weight. That's a far stretch from $2.
    Don't forget your time or your gear. Of course the longer you use the gear, the cheaper the fish become.

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    Quote Originally Posted by smithtb View Post
    Was simply trying to answer a question about price. It's surprising how affordable fresh salmon is in these parts. I think it is undervalued, especially compared to halibut - which I like - but comon, it's not salmon.

    I live near a local processor. I could travel a distance and catch for sport or personal use much of the seafood they sell. Sometimes I do, and I value that opportunity. Other times I find it easier to stop on my way home from work and pay the man.

    I don't know what it costs on average to dipnet (I built my dipnet a long time ago and can walk to the river) - but I would have guessed $1-$3 probably - I think it's higher than $2 for people who travel far or take time off and treat it like a vacation. Which I'm totally cool with. Just pick up your poop, people.
    I'm thrilled by how affordable it is to get quality salmon in this state. $5.50/lb from Costco, $3.50/lb direct from a commercial guy, $0.20/lb dipnetting or about $0.20/lb catching in Ship Creek. It's all a great deal.

    I do want to question the $2.00/lb figure. My most expensive way of dip-netting involves my brother-in-law and I driving 500 miles round trip to Chitina, catching 45 fish a piece with Hem and driving home. Total cost for the two of us is $400, and we come home with close to 400 lb of fish (headed and gutted). That's $1/lb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yukon Cornelius View Post
    Don't forget your time or your gear. Of course the longer you use the gear, the cheaper the fish become.
    I love to dipnet and spend time on the water, so the time consideration doesn't have a dollar value on it. And the dipnets were a garage sale purchase for $25 a piece 8 years ago maybe? My uncle borrows the nets every year and pays to have new nets put on about every other year. Not much other gear cost involved.
    An unarmed man is subject, an armed man is a citizen.

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    Ok so any of the couple thousand guys driving the $30,000 motorhomes towing their $20,000 side-by-side while their wife follows in the family Suburban with the nets strapped to the top can chime in here... There were a couple of you parked in my neighborhood all summer...

    Ha! Doesn't matter really - people like doing it and it's affordable. Luckily, so is fresh caught salmon for those who can't or don't like dipping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tee Jay View Post
    http://www.adn.com/article/20150726/...-alaska-salmon

    The article days UCI reds going for $4.50 to $5 per pound. May be dependent on the market.
    I'll will guarantee that price isn't close. I don't get $5 for my CR reds on the very first opener of the year. You know the fish that they fly to Seattle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiak kid View Post
    I'll will guarantee that price isn't close. I don't get $5 for my CR reds on the very first opener of the year. You know the fish that they fly to Seattle.
    Really? I get $7 a pound for fresh red fillets from my dipnet fish when I sell them to the local tourists. That's a shame you don't get at least $5.
    An unarmed man is subject, an armed man is a citizen.

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaximumPenetration View Post
    Really? I get $7 a pound for fresh red fillets from my dipnet fish when I sell them to the local tourists. That's a shame you don't get at least $5.
    Funny guy. $7/lb for fillets would translate into about $3.50/lb whole by weight. Less if you discount the time/expense of filleting them... Better up your prices...

    Ha!

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