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Thread: hip waders or chest waders fall river float bear hunt

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    Default hip waders or chest waders fall river float bear hunt

    I will be coming to Alaska during the last week of August in 2016 to do a river float Brown Bear hunt my outfitter uses lacrosse hip waders.The guide that will be taking me uses chest waders neoprene feet and river boots with rubber soles.I have never used either and am looking for ideas, suggestions and brands.Is neoprene waterproof? Am I going to have any issues with cold feet and is one better to walk in?

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    Member jojomoose's Avatar
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    I have been using Simms pant waders for a few years now on float hunts. They work amazing, and keep the heat in on those really cold days. I had one problem with hole, then sent them in. They replaced them for me with only shipping costs. I will use them from here on out, just get a good wader shoe.

    Joe

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    If you can manage to bring both, I would bring both, because there is a time and a place for both. But if I could only bring one, I would choose chest waders with good wading boots over hip boots. Hip boots are nice for hiking a far distance from the river in search of game. Chest waders are more useful while traveling up and down the river and for climbing in and out of the boat. I've hunted out of my chest waders before, but you have a tendency to overheat and sweat in them. But, hip boots have only a limited usefulness in and around the boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jojomoose View Post
    I have been using Simms pant waders for a few years now on float hunts. They work amazing, and keep the heat in on those really cold days. I had one problem with hole, then sent them in. They replaced them for me with only shipping costs. I will use them from here on out, just get a good wader shoe.

    Joe
    Agreed. This is all I use for my moose and bear hunts. I usually keep them rolled down to my waist and wear them like pants.

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    I would never wear chest waders in a boat if you ever went over board you would be done for they are dangerous, if I was wearing hip waders I would have them rolled down so you might have a chance to get them off to save yourself. Just my thoughts.

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    I have swam several times in my chest waders without a PFD and I'm still here. It's not easy, but it's doable. No worse than trying to swim in a set of Helly Hanson rain gear. Of course, unless I am in an ocean boat, I am wearing a PFD most of the time. That said, I have zero use for hip boots. I've never found a set that fits me, nor a set that I could consider hiking more than 100 yds in. Chest waders with wading boots are far better in my mind. I happen to have a set of Cabelas chest waders that are the built in boot type. I've hiked a long ways in them and for some reason they fit better than any rubber boots I own.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter1951 View Post
    I would never wear chest waders in a boat if you ever went over board you would be done for they are dangerous, if I was wearing hip waders I would have them rolled down so you might have a chance to get them off to save yourself. Just my thoughts.

    best
    Really??? There are probably thousands upon thousands of people all over the country that climb into a pair of chest waders then climb into a boat and it happens just about every single day of the summer, and although people do fall out and drowned occasionally, not too many do it while wearing an adequate life preserver. Drive down to the Kenai on any given day in the ssummer time and count how many people you see in boats wearing chest waders, and then count how many of those people died that day. I'm not saying it doesn't happen but, come on, you don't stop driving in a car because of all the people they get killed in car accidents, do you?

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    If you want to defend being stupid well go ahead, I just put the information out there if you want to wear chest waders hell I will help you put them on.

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    Default hip waders or chest waders fall river float bear hunt

    I guess your idea of stupid and mine are different animals. Some people have no problem getting into a vehicle and driving down the road, regardless of how many people are killed in automobile accidents every year ( I'm guessing more then what are killed while wearing chest waders in a boat), maybe you consider those people stupid also. I always wear a wading belt with my waders and when I'm in a boat I'm always wearing a life preserver, I would never suggest not wearing one and nobody gets in my boat without wearing one. Bottom line is there's risks with everything you do in life and people just need to be sensible about how far they go with those risks... Anyway, Simms waders are very comfortable and durable and will definitely keep you dry, as long as you don't go for a swim.

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    my first float trip I wore hips. Got wet many times in a 10 day float. After that I wore chest waders and only got wet when I tripped on rocks pulling the raft two or three times over the next 9 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter1951 View Post
    if you want to wear chest waders hell I will help you put them on.

    best
    I feel like I'm getting to the point in my life where I might just have to take you up on his offer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter1951 View Post
    I would never wear chest waders in a boat if you ever went over board you would be done for they are dangerous, if I was wearing hip waders I would have them rolled down so you might have a chance to get them off to save yourself. Just my thoughts.

    best
    I gave your advice lots of thought and so just went down in the garage and cut a toe hole in all my chest waders to let the river run out, should I ever fall in.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Quote Originally Posted by hunter1951 View Post
    If you want to defend being stupid well go ahead, I just put the information out there if you want to wear chest waders hell I will help you put them on.

    best
    Stupid would be wearing chest (or waist) waders without a belt. Worn outside and cinched tight. I've fallen in and my pants don't even get wet with a belt. The air trapped inside will help keep you on top of the water.

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    Member Mkay's Avatar
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    Ah yes.... the old chest wader vs hip wader while hunting debate. Be glad to clear this one up. True, dozens upon dozens of hunters in this state are killed every fall while wearing chest waders who drown when they fall out of the boat. The real truth is only those wearing cotton die when they fall in. Your life is measured in a few seconds if you fill up yr waders wearing the fabric of death...cotton. A few pass on before even hitting the water...just knowing they wear that diabolical fabric. Folks wearing good under armor long johns are known to last hours while bobbing up and down in the drink. Hope that helps.
    My child was inmate of the month at Mat-Su pre-trial Correctional facility.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lousarchery View Post
    I will be coming to Alaska during the last week of August in 2016 to do a river float Brown Bear hunt my outfitter uses lacrosse hip waders.The guide that will be taking me uses chest waders neoprene feet and river boots with rubber soles.I have never used either and am looking for ideas, suggestions and brands.Is neoprene waterproof? Am I going to have any issues with cold feet and is one better to walk in?
    If it's a float hunt with minimal walking, then chest waders make a lot of sense. I'd pay more attention to the guide than the outfitter and if the other guy in the raft is wearing chest waders because he's BTDT I'd take his cue and wear chest waders. If there's a lot of hiking I'd have something else to step into for the trek, but for a float hunt I could easily see the advantage of chest waders.

    As for their danger, there are numerous youtubes about this myth; and myth it is. Chest waders or hip waders make no difference if you fall into the water. If you keep your wits about you can easily swim out with either and they'll actually provide some additional buoyancy.

    LINK

    LINK
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    Quote Originally Posted by jojomoose View Post
    I have been using Simms pant waders for a few years now on float hunts. They work amazing, and keep the heat in on those really cold days. I had one problem with hole, then sent them in. They replaced them for me with only shipping costs. I will use them from here on out, just get a good wader shoe.

    Joe
    This is the ticket.

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    Today's waders are much safer and comfortable on a long float hunt.. i always wear waders, but use a belt and draw strap and a good life jacket while floating and will say that life jacket has saved my life along with others, when everything went wrong and i went for a long swim in cold water in cold weather while moose hunting. But the advantages are dry feet all day and no water running over shorter boots, but i do carry hiking boots for long hikes and meat packing to and from the raft...

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    Chest waders or hip waders make no difference if you fall into the water. If you keep your wits about you can easily swim out with either and they'll actually provide some additional buoyancy.
    Not entirely true....depends on how far you have to swim and the type of wader. In neoprene chest waders I can easily see how they wouldn't be a problem to swim in. But, you need to go back and see what they guy in the first link said when he changed over into the nylon waders.... He said, because of having less buoyancy and feeling himself sinking faster, that "I don't how long you'd have." That's the key right there and I know this for a fact.....

    I had always wondered, and actually doubted, that it would be that much harder to swim in hip waders. Well, I had to unexpectedly put that to the test while launching the boat one day. We had launched the boat and a buddy of mine was holding the bow rope in his hands when he gave it a yank after the boat cleared the trailer. When he did the rope broke and and boat started drifting away downriver. I had to react immediately and busted into the water with my ankle fit, insulated LaCross hip waders on. It was over my head almost right away but even as the waders filled I still had momentum and made it to the boat fairly easily which was only about 25' away. But by the time I grabbed the bow eye, turned around and started swimming back pulling the boat it felt like I had 20 pound weights attached to each leg. Let me just say that I've been swimming pretty much since I learned to walk, so I am a very strong swimmer. I made it back "ok" but the added effort it took for me to get back to shore pulling that boat was very surprising. Sure, pulling the boat made it harder, but like the guy said, had I needed to swim any distance at all, even free handed, I really don't know how long I could do it....it was that hard. I'm pretty confident now in saying that if you have to swim for your life very far at all, taking the waders off in the water first would be the thing to do BEFORE you get tired.

    I used to be pretty nonchalant about wearing my life jacket but I've gotten pretty good about wearing one now. I do, however, want to tell everybody that doesn't always wear a life jacket, if they are going to wear hip waders in deep water, you better make da*n sure you wear one then. It is NOT easy to swim in heavy hip waders...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I purposely went in water over the top of my sock foot neoprene chest waders to test the idea that wearing chest waders is dangerous if a person finds themselves floating in water unexpectedly. I held open my waders so that water displaced all the air that had been in them and the waders were filled completely with water. What I found out was that not only are they NOT dangerous but in fact ADD safety by providing additional floatation because of the neoprene composition. I also concluded that a lifevest should be worn over the outside of the waders to prevent "ballooning" of the top of the waders if a person finds the need to grab on to something stationary while in current. My unscientific findings do not, of course, apply to non-neoprene chest waders but apply only to waders made of neoprene. YMMV and you need to come to your own conclusions regarding this debate as this info is only provided for intertainment and not education.

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    If you are on a boat float hunt ect. wear a belt with your chest waders and a life jacket and know what to do if you fall in. Good examples

    https://search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?...swim+in+waders

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