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Thread: six pack license?

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default six pack license?

    Looking into seeing what i need to do to get my six pack license, i've seen trucks driving around with business names on it that say they will help with the process. can any of you license holders in here, help me understand the process and costs associated with the six pack license? where do i go to test for it, license fees? stuff of that nature...
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    Looking into seeing what i need to do to get my six pack license, i've seen trucks driving around with business names on it that say they will help with the process. can any of you license holders in here, help me understand the process and costs associated with the six pack license? where do i go to test for it, license fees? stuff of that nature...
    You'll need 365 days of documented time on the water which can be time on your own vessel or working on another. There's a two week course in Anc that can prep you for the exam. Pass the exam, a drug test, pay the fees and complete the paperwork and you can get a UPV license.

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    The easiest way to get the course is by either doing it on line which you have a year to do all the required test and a final test at either Seward or King Salmon. There is also a course you can take in Seward that is about 2 wks. for the OUPV license. When I say the license once you complete the course and pass the 4 test required for OUPV then you have to fill out ALL the paper work and full med exam, twics card, piss test and your documented boat time and submit all to the CG for approve. Its not really a over night process.

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    It's a bit daunting but not horrible. Used to be they would encourage you to get a 100 ton instead of OUPV. Same test as I recall. I got a study course that was a bunch of VHS videos and did it myself at home one Winter. Rule of the road seems to be the section most struggle with as it required a 90% to pass. Took me 2 tries as I am not so good at memorization. In retrospect, if there was a sea school nearby, that would probably be the way to go.

    Getting it is one thing, keeping it current is another. I quit the charter business and couldn't account for enough time to keep mine up so I had to let it go. Sort of a bummer after putting in the effort to get it the first time.

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    how much time is needed to keep it current?
    documented time on the water? does fresh water count? how does it need to be documented?
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    This will answer most of what you want or need to know as far as what you need to do and for what license. I took this course for OUPV/ Masters and sailing. I finish my last test in Oct when I get back. This is self study but the online support is pretty good and a pretty quick response back. If you have the time I would suggest taking the course in Anchorage to Seward. Self study is much more difficult with the everyday task that come up but if you are sitting in the class room then? well you know the deal.
    http://www.marinerslearningsystem.co...#package-deals
    Masters with tonnage license... you still have to have OUPV license and tonnage is based on what you have experience on that is documented.

    Sweepint
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    It takes around 70+ days a year to maintain your sea-days .... 365 sea days every 5 year renewal period. Renewal process is a process. It keeps getting tougher each time it seems. You sign a sworn statement of your sea-days if you are claiming those days on your vessel. If claiming days on someone else's vessel you must have them fill out a form that they sign under penalty of perjury. Remember this is Military, USCG, they do not mess around. They are very serious.

    The 100 ton testing is degrees more difficult than the OUPV ... Test for the highest tonnage you can qualify to test for.

    The test is not easy. After passing the test you must get a TWIC card as mentioned above, in order to be licensed or renew. Once you have a TWIC card you do not have to renew(the TWIC) unless your employer requires it or you are operating a 100 ton (or higher) vessel. TWIC cards require a very extensive background check, among other things. TWIC process was written into Bush's Homeland Security Law and is separate from your Masters License process.

    I would highly suggest a hands on course to prepare for the test. Or take the U of AK Maritime course ... testing is part of the course and after passing the course you qualify for your license.

    There is a shortage of licensed Captains and there are many well paying jobs in that field available. Working as a Charter boat Captain usually pays very well.

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    Three words for you. Alaska Nautical School. John will get you all the info you need. Go through his school the best money youll spend. If you have your own boat its easy to get "sea time". Call John He is in Anchorage. I just went through all this. More info pm me.

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    I did this online with the Mariner's Learning and it wasn't that challenging. As previously stated there is a bit of documentation that you'll need to do but nothing too onerous. What I liked about the online was the practice tests. They were spot on for preparing for the test. I took mine in Seward. I've never actually used mine for a business but frankly enjoyed brushing up on my skills and taking the exam. Who know maybe I'll actually use it when I retire.....
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

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    I'm curious about logging the required time on the water. (365 days?)

    Would days spent on a pond in a rowboat count?
    Does the time have to be on navigable waters?
    Would it need to be a powered vessel and or one over a certain length?
    Would I need 365 days on the salt or just 90 of the Total for a nearshore 6 pack?

    I wouldn't have the required time if I only counted days on the salt in my big boat, but I would if I could count days on lakes and farm ponds.
    I haven't been able to find a clear answer despite significant searching.

    Thank you.

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    The boat must be at least 16' long.

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    If I remember correctly it has to be motorized.
    90 days service in the last 3 years on vessels of appropriate tonnage.
    Near Coastal: 360 days deck service in the operation of vessels, including 90 days service on ocean or near coastal waters.
    Great Lakes/Inland: 360 days deck service in the operation of vessels, including 90 days service on Great Lakes.
    Inland: 360 days deck service in the operation of vessels.

    There is more requirements but this is the meat of it.

    Sweepint
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    [QUOTE=SMH;1494580]I'm curious about logging the required time on the water. (365 days?)

    Would days spent on a pond in a rowboat count?
    Does the time have to be on navigable waters?
    Would it need to be a powered vessel and or one over a certain length?
    Would I need 365 days on the salt or just 90 of the Total for a nearshore 6 pack?

    I wouldn't have the required time if I only counted days on the salt in my big boat, but I would if I could count days on lakes and farm ponds.
    I haven't been able to find a clear answer despite significant searching.


    Not to sound like a wise guy but why should time on a lake or farm pond count toward sea time ??? There are enough people operating boats that a clueless but they have finagled sea time to get licenses. I've put batteries in flashlights since i've been a kid maybe i could be a licensed electrical engineer ??

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  14. #14

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    The Kodiak guy said it all; Alaska Nautical Training School. John is awesome, I'd be interested in a refresher just to gleen some knowledge from the guy. When you apply for your license, put down ALL time spent on the water, regardless of where & how. Also it helps to write a letter to the CG explaining anything that you feel feel appropriate or addressing gray areas of "Sea" time. They're pretty smart guys and I called them a few times in anc to clear up questions.
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    Thanks guys, there is a lot of good information here.
    Please keep it coming!

    Potbuilder- I agree that small boat/small lake boating time does little to build one's ocean going skills, but I could argue the same about most of my nearshore smooth water days on the ocean. I'm not defending the value of knowledge gained by those days but rather the legal ramifications of counting them. (a legal honest claim vs perjury)
    Regarding being an electrical engineer by placing batteries in a flashlight: If by doing so you somehow obtained knowledge and capability equal to an electrical engineer and can prove it by passing the same final exams and practical applications, then I say go for it!

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    This should cover it from the maritime academy
    Particulars:
    Review the following to get a feel for Sea Time requirements and how to document your time.
    • You are trying to accumulate a minimum of 360 days of sea time
    (720 days with 360 on Near Coastal for a Master Near Coastal. see Types of Licenses

    • 90 days of the total must be within the last 3 years (recency clause)

    • One “day” is considered a minimum of 4 hours underway in a 24 hour period. Time at anchor or dock is not considered.

    • The time you are acquiring is an estimate based on log books or memory

    • You may use time acquired since your 16th birthday

    • You may use time on your own vessel (proof of ownership will be required i.e. an
    old registration or bill of sale), private or commercial vessels.

    • Time on working vessels or friends vessels may be documented by using the
    USCG Sea Time Form or a letter with the information. See: Sample Sea Service Letter

    • Make sure you include the registration # or documentation # of each vessel used.
    The Coast Guard will not accept forms without vessel ID #

    • Use a separate form for each vessel. See: USCG Sea Time Form

    • For Gross Tonnage see Determining Gross tonnage and work the formula for the type of vessel

    • Identify the waters (Inland or Near Coastal) that the vessel was on for evaluation.

    • Begin with the most recent experience first and work backwards in time until you have
    accumulated 360 days (or 720 if Master Near Coastal)
    Remember: 90 days must be within the last three years.

    •Going beyond the 360 (or 720) days required is to no avail. Use time that is easiest to document (your own vessel) first.

    •Time acquired on vessels larger than 300 tons will not be considered.
    • Time on rowing vessels will not be considered.

    • Time acquired on military vessels is up to 60% applicable.
    Your local Coast Guard REC will provide you with forms for military time.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  18. #18

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    For those guiding or looking to guide, Mercury has a great Alaska Guide program available at this time. 25% rebate on the base price up to $4000 per engine annually and $250 credit toward pro gear. You must work through a dealer to get approved. If anyone is interested in more details shoot me a pm.

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    What does this have to do with this thread

    [
    QUOTE=Halibutgrove;1497140]For those guiding or looking to guide, Mercury has a great Alaska Guide program available at this time. 25% rebate on the base price up to $4000 per engine annually and $250 credit toward pro gear. You must work through a dealer to get approved. If anyone is interested in more details shoot me a pm.[/QUOTE]

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    What does this have to do with this thread
    It's an FYI, and for those obviously pursuing a Captains license, I would imagine they plan to put it to use and possibly make some money as a guide. The Mercury Alaska Guide program is one way to save allot of money and put more of that hard earned money in your pocket. I've had my license since 2004 and had such a program been out when I started it would have been nice to know.

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